Publications

This page provides information about recent relevant publications.

See also AHRA Publications

see also Architecture and Culture

The Extended Self: Architecture, Memes and Minds

Chris Abel

In his wide-ranging study of architecture and cultural evolution, Chris Abel argues that, despite progress in sustainable development and design, resistance to changing personal and social identities shaped by a technology- based and energy-hungry culture is impeding efforts to avert drastic climate change. The book traces the roots of that culture to the coevolution of Homo sapiens and technology, from the first use of tools as artificial extensions to the human body, to the motorized cities spreading around the world, whose uncontrolled effects are changing the planet itself.

Advancing a new concept of the meme, called the ‘technical meme,’ as the primary agent of cognitive extension and technical embodiment, Abel proposes a theory of the ‘extended self’ encompassing material and spatial as well as psychological and social elements. Drawing upon research from philosophy, psychology and the neurosciences, the book presents a new approach to environmental and cultural studies. Written in a clear and engaging manner, it addresses a broad readership searching for insights into the origins of the crisis.

 

 

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Beyond Live/Work: the architecture of home-based work

Frances Holliss

Beyond Live/Work: the architecture of home-based work explores the old but neglected building type that combines dwelling and workplace, the ‘workhome’. It traces a previously untold architectural history illustrated by images of largely forgotten buildings. Despite having existed for hundreds, if not thousands, of years in every country across the globe this dual-use building type has long gone unnoticed.

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Architecture and Capitalism – Solids and Flows: Vol. 5, Issue 2

Catharina Gabrielsson and Helena Mattsson (Editors)

‘Capitalism is back!’

Nancy Fraser, “Behind Marx’s Hidden Abode: For an Expanded Conception of Capitalism”, New Left Review 86 (2014) p. 55

 

The aim of this issue of Architecture and Culture is to revisit the relationship between architecture and capitalism, not by reverting back to ‘critique’, ‘post-criticality’ or even ‘resistance’, but from an outset of addressing their complex relationality. Going beyond the historic, industrial and building-based scenario offered by Peggy Deamer (ed.) in Architecture and Capitalism (2014), extending on and problematizing both architecture and capitalism allows us to address this relationship from other perspectives. We propose a thematic heading of ‘solids and flows’ to open up for less predictable, essentially non-linear, and more imaginary investigations.

Solids – which is how architecture most readily is perceived, as tied to buildings, symbolic and semiotic capital, manifestations of private or public wealth … but equally capturing the inaccessibility of corporate power; the ‘trust’ of credit ratings that certify risk-taking in the bank and finance sector; the closure and immovability of capital locked up in tax havens and offshore financial centres.

Flows – as in the fickle movements of global capitalism through networks of finance and speculation (and the arbitrary effects of their hitting the ground)… but equally capturing recent re-orientations in architecture towards relational or ecologist approaches, undoing the physical object, with an emphasis on process, agency and affect. Spanning across the virtual and the real, the material and the immaterial, the relationship between architecture and capitalism increases in complexity as regards to the production of identity, the generation of desire, and the forging of spatial relations. By juxtaposing solids and flows as tropes or figures of thought, we envisage the possibility for new and transversal connections; ones that, by exposing the gaps, discontinuities and ruptures in, through and between architecture and capitalism carry the potential for non-determinate futures.

 

Call for papers for this issue

From this outset, we invite rigorously speculative, purposely imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating contributions that explore architecture and capitalism from unexpected angles – bearing in mind the slippery slope of too-narrowly confined definitions. This call is explicitly trans- and cross-disciplinary in nature, encouraging critical and emerging scholarship dealing with capitalist studies to engage with architecture as a tradition of projecting, shaping, assessing and experiencing the built environment; and scholars and practitioners in architecture and neighbouring disciplines to relate more closely to the dynamics of capitalism and its current transfigurations, brought to the fore through the advent of concepts and theories such as noologi, affective or immaterial labour, economies of debt, new Marxist scholarship, and neo-materialist ontologies. How can we think about these conjunctions of materialisation and immaterialisation, visibility and invisibility, solidification and vaporization? How can they be analysed, illustrated, represented, designed or described? We call for papers, essays, manifestos, historical inquires, fieldwork notes, photographic compilations, drawing materials etc. that address this broad and fluid topic in creative and original ways.

Contributions might address the following themes:

  • Processes and techniques of commodification and marketization in architecture
  • Dimensions of value(s) in and through architecture, alternative values, and ‘value diremption’ (the ‘Other’ of value)   
  • Theories on the spectacular, affect/affective and experiential in architecture and their potential for generating the unexpected
  • The spatial, material and localized conditions for central agents in global capitalism (bank and finance sector, corporate HQ, digital platforms etc.)
  • The relationship between design, housing tenures and property ownership
  • The architectural imports of spatial occupancy and appropriation
  • Dispossession, austerity and the architecture of poverty
  • Thickened and thinned out spaces, secondary homes, and non-habitation
  • Real estate-driven architectures of affect

 

Contributions can range from short observations or manifestos, creative pieces, or visual essays, to longer academic articles. Architecture and Culture is published in both on-line and hard-copy formats: there is capacity to host on-line contributions that operate in a different way to paper-based work.

 

Production schedule

CfP                             May 2016

Response                  1 September 2016 at latest

Editors selection     October 2016

Peer Reviewing       October-December 2016

Authors Revisions  December- February 2017

Editorial checking  March 2017

Copy to publisher   1 April 2017

Issue publication    July 2017

 

For author instructions, please go to ‘Instructions for Authors’ at

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rfac20&page=instructions#.VzRvBmN7BHg

 

Upload submissions at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/archcult/

Or via ‘submit online’ at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rfac

 

If you have any queries or require further information, please contact:

Catharina Gabrielsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Helena Mattsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Sustainable Lina

Condello, Annette and Lehmann, Steffen (eds.),

This essential book unravels the link between regional cultures, adaptive reuse of existing buildings and sustainability. It concentrates on the social dimensions relating to Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi’s late adaptive reuse projects and works from the 1960s to the early 1990s, interpreting her themes, technical sources and design strategies of the creation of luxury as sustainability. The edited book charts how Lina Bo Bardi “invented” her own version of sustainability, introduced this concept through her landscape and adaptive reuse designs and through ideas about cross-cultures in Brazil. The book offers a critical reflection, exploration and demonstration of the importance of adaptive reuse in the landscape and related themes for researchers and provides researchers and students new material on sustainability for further study.

‘This collection of essays makes a very important and engaging contribution to suggest that to take Lina as an inspiration is to deal with her contradictions and to evaluate the stakes of what she struggled with in a 21st century world. What the authors gathered here and have laid out is a very timely invitation to discern “Lessons from Lina” in relationship to today’s pressing issues of architecture and environment, sustainability, recycling, and developing an ethical design position in a world of diminishing resources and escalating challenges.’

Prof Barry Bergdoll, Columbia University and MoMA, New York (USA)

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Shadow-Makers: a cultural history of shadows in architecture

Stephen Kite

The making of shadows is an act as old as architecture itself. From the gloom of the medieval hearth through to the masterworks of modernism, shadows have been an essential yet neglected presence in architectural history.

Shadow-Makers
tells for the first time the history of shadows in architecture. It weaves together a rich narrative – combining close readings of significant buildings both ancient and modern with architectural theory and art history – to reveal the key places and moments where shadows shaped architecture in distinctive and dynamic ways. It shows how shadows are used as an architectural instrument of form, composition, and visual effect, while also exploring the deeper cultural context – tracing differing conceptions of their meaning and symbolism, whether as places of refuge, devotion, terror, occult practice, sublime experience or as metaphors of the unconscious.

Within a chronological framework encompassing medieval, baroque, enlightenment, sublime, picturesque, and modernist movements, a wide range of topics are explored, from Hawksmoor's London churches, Japanese temple complexes and the shade-patterns of Islamic cities, to Ruskin in Venice and Aldo Rossi and Louis Kahn in the 20th century. This beautifully-illustrated study seeks to understand the work of these shadow-makers through their drawings, their writings, and through the masterpieces they built.

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Growing Compact: Urban Form, Density and Sustainability

Steffen Lehmann

Growing Compact: Urban Form, Density and Sustainability explores and unravels the phenomena, links and benefits between density, compactness and the sustainability of cities. It looks at the socio-climatic implications of density and takes a more holistic approach to sustainable urbanism by understanding the correlations between the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the city, and the challenges and opportunities with density. The book presents contributions from internationally well-known scholars, thinkers and practitioners whose theoretical and practical works address city planning, urban and architectural design for density and sustainability at various levels, including challenges in building resilience against climate change and natural disasters, capacity and integration for growth and adaptability, ageing, community and security, vegetation, food production, compact resource systems and regeneration.

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