AHRA Newsletter:
February–March 2016

If you would like to receive this information by e-mail, and you haven't yet signed up as a member of AHRA, please follow the link to the AHRA website for details of how to register on the database. Membership is currently free and is open to all humanities researchers working in Schools of Architecture and related disciplines both in the UK and overseas. Please also encourage colleagues to register here: http://www.ahra-architecture.org/registration/

If you are planning a research event that you would like to promote through the newsletter, please log in to the AHRA website and post the details by clicking on the 'Post Your Event' link under the 'Events' menu. These details will appear on the 'Future Events' page within a few days (subject to moderation) and will also be included in the next issue of the Newsletter. If you have not logged in to the site before, you should enter your default username ('firstnamelastname') and click on the 'forgotten your password' link for further instructions.

To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

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The next newsletter will be issued in April 2016

New Events

Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

13th AHRA International Conference

School of Architecture Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm, Sweden

November 17 2016 - November 19 2016

The 2016 AHRA conference will address connections between architecture and feminisms with an emphasis on plural expressions of feminist identity and non-identity. From radical feminist, to lesbian feminist, to black feminist, to post-colonial feminist, to crip feminist, to queer feminist, to trans feminist, to Sara Ahmed’s feminist killjoy, to feminist men, to posthuman feminist, to the liberal and neoliberal feminist, to material feminist, to marxist feminist, to eco feminist, to Roxane Gay’s popular Bad Feminist and many others, even to post feminist voices, the claim to feminism continues to be tested and contested. And this conference will be no exception. Between architecture and feminisms our specific focus will be upon transversal relations across ecologies, economies and technologies. Specifically, we are concerned with the exploration of ecologies of practice, the drawing out of alternative economies, and experimentation with mixed technologies, from craft to advanced computational technologies.

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Thu 17 November 2016

Writing Buildings

Call for Papers

University of Kent

July 14 2016

CREAte, the research centre for architecture and the humanities at the Kent School of University, University of Kent, is holding a conference in collaboration with the Architectural Review which will bring together quite different traditions of writing about historic buildings. The special character of this conference is that speakers will be drawn from both academic and non-academic fields, and from a range of disciplines that touch on architectural experience and history. In this way we aim to offer a new experience for writers on architecture, interior design and urban space.

 

We are inviting papers from those in Architecture, English, History, Sociology, Film and Drama, Landscape Studies and related disciplines with a specialist interest in writing about buildings and urban spaces or experiences across different time periods. The common theme of the papers will be the uses of a variety of voices in creating architecture culture.

 

Writing Buildings will be a two-day conference on the subject of alternative ways of writing architectural history which will encourage experimentation in criticism through breaking disciplinary barriers. The programme will include papers from both academic disciplines and non-academic professions which engage with the built environment, for example, journalism, interior design and construction

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Thu 14 July 2016

8th Architecture, Culture and Spirituality Symposium

Utopia, Architecture and Spirituality

New Harmony, Indiana, United States of America

June 23 2016 - June 26 2016

fThe Forum of Architecture, Culture and Spirituality announces its next annual Symposium. ACS 8 will take place in the historically significant, beautiful and enchanting town of New Harmony, Indiana. This place, through its remarkable history, offers the perfect opportunity to consider the relationships between Utopia, Architecture and Spirituality, the very topic of the ACS 8 Symposium. More specifically, ACS 8 asks us to look at utopia as an idea and ideal, real and imagined, in all of its ramifications for architecture and the built environment, culture, politics, and, especially, spirituality. ACS 8 asks us to reflect on utopias past, to explore utopia in the present reality, and to speculate on how designers can take up utopian ideas and action in the future.

ACS 8 will take place June 23-26, 2016. New Harmony, Indiana, is about 2.5 hours drive from Saint Louis (Missouri) and 2 hours from Louisville (Kentucky). ACS 8 is being organized by four co-chairs. In alphabetical order by last name, they are: Ben Jacks, Nancy Mangum McCaslin, Ben Nicholson, and Michelangelo Sabatino.

ACS 8 co-chairs kindly invite all individuals interested in participating in this event to submit 500-1000 extended abstracts. All work will be blind-peer reviewed by at least three separate scholars/practitioners. The submission deadline is Monday 18 January 2016. Please, visit the symposium website to learn about all the necessary details

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Thu 23 June 2016

The Place of Silence: Experience, Environment and Affect

Call for Papers

Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh UK

June 22 2016

This symposium sets out to explore diverse practices, affects, politics and cultural meanings of silence in historical and contemporary contexts. Situations in which silence is said to be experienced or practiced are highly relative, and the term itself – which is often linked to some condition of cessation or interval – carries complex and varied significations. Thus while, on one hand, the often-remarked upon contemporary ‘loss of silence’ has been frequently linked to a disappearance of reflection or inwardness, silence has also, on the other, been understood as a condition of intensified outwardness – of heightened attention, anticipation, suspense or expanded listening. As life in communities or institutions of silence show, it is about much more than refraining from vocalization – rather, it is a fully embodied practice that implicates movement, gesture, breathing and touch. Approached from another point of view, the role that silence has played as a critical gesture, as a condition of refusal and noncompliance, suggests that the term might be conceptualized in relation to questions of autonomy. Moreover, in certain circumstances, it gains an ethical dimension and force, as is the case with the silence that is exercised to protect others or that is the defendant’s right. At an extreme, silence is often the sign of a limit condition – the silence that falls at the point of exhaustion, catastrophe or technological breakdown. Similarly, it is taken to mark the traumatic limits of experience, as that which testifies to an event beyond any possibility of adequate expression or symbolization. And yet at the same time it inheres in the everyday, appearing as the very precondition of communication, as the gap or delay that acts as the support of speech, or the spacing that forms the condition of legibility of written text. Again, silence might be approached as a particular area of interest that articulates with the larger question of atmosphere, and hence aura, affect, ambience and Stimmung (attunement, mood, disposition).

Keynote speakers

Gernot Böhme (Institute for Practical Philosophy, Darmstadt).

Paul Carter (Professor of Design (Urban), School of Architecture and Design/Design Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne).

Mark Dorrian (Forbes Chair in Architecture, Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh).

Alberto Pérez-Gómez (Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor, School of Architecture, McGill University, Montreal).

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Wed 22 June 2016

European Architectural History Network / Fourth International Meeting

EAHN 2016 Dublin Meeting Call for Sessions and Round Tables

Dublin, Ireland

June 02 2016

In accordance with its mission statement, the EAHN is organizing a meeting which is intended to increase the visibility of the discipline, foster transnational, interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches to the study of the built environment, and facilitate the exchange of research results in the field. Although the scope of the meeting is European, members of the larger scholarly community are invited to submit proposals related not only to European architecture but also to that of the rest of the world.

The main purpose of the meeting is to map the general state of research in disciplines related to the built environment, to promote discussion of current themes and concerns, and to foster new directions for research in the field. Session proposals are intended to cover different periods in the history of architecture and different approaches to the built environment including landscape and urban history. Parallel sessions will consist of either five papers or four papers and a respondent, with time for dialogue and questions at the end. In addition, a limited number of roundtable debates addressing key issues in the field will also take place at the meeting. Proposals for these should re-map, re-define, or outline the current state of the discipline. They will typically consist of a discussion between panel members and encourage debate with the audience. The goal is to create a forum in which different scholars can present and discuss their ideas, research materials and methodologies.

 

 

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Thu 2 June 2016

AHRA PhD Student Symposium

University of Sheffield School of Architecture (SSoA)

April 07 2016

The 2016 AHRA PhD Student Symposium will be hosted by the University of Sheffield School of Architecture, with presentations from current graduate students in the architectural humanities. The symposium will be free to attend, but registration is required via this Eventbrite site:

https://ahra-symposium.eventbrite.co.uk

 

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Thu 7 April 2016

Re-imagining Bengal: Architecture, built environment and cultural heritage

Call for book chapters

February 28 2016

INTRODUCTION
Bengal is remarkably ancient and its contemporary features are also rich and diversified. They present us with a rich palimpsest of layers of history with deep rooted imprints of Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic culture, which range from the heart of older parts of traditional city enclaves to remote rural places. They carry the tangible and intangible elements of Bengal society and sustain local identity and culture. The local built environment, having both tangible and intangible cultural qualities, often without being one or the other, is not simple to define or capture. It is not linear and embodies multiple issues and elements. Local cultural heritage is not static; it is inherited as an element to be passed on through subsequent generations. It may be the cultural legacy, and continuity inherited in time that incorporates the identity of place and people from past into the present in a perpetual process that evolves with time and embodies local tradition, knowledge and value.
The local built environment takes shape through everyday practices. It is embodied and embedded in rituals and prosaic subsistence practices. However, other issues such as environmental performance, accessibility, their place in urban fabric and urban design are equally important.
There has been limited studies in this subject area and they were often focused and not comprehensive enough to cover all critical issues of architecture, built environment and cultural heritage of Bengal. This book takes a multidisciplinary approach to address historical issues, present trends and future possibilities from a wider perspective.
The objective of this edited book is to provide researchers opportunity to study the concepts and related practices of architecture, built environment and cultural heritage of Bengal: past, present and future. Topics can range from broader to specific issues. Idea is to have a deeper insight into the historic aspects of cultural heritage, where they stand now and future challenges. The possible issues covered in this book will be broader in context and subject matter. This has been done to make the edited book more flexible and to stimulate further research interest.

 

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Sun 28 February 2016

Regional Urbanism in the Era of Globalisation

University of Huddersfield

February 03 2016

This international conference explores the changing face of regional urbanism, asking if the environmental, economic and social challenges facing many parts of the world will provide new opportunities for regional cities to develop alternative forms of urban living which are fundamentally different from those of the rapidly expanding metropolises.  Inspired by recent debates about the over-riding economic, political and cultural dominance of London in the United Kingdom, and the survival of regional cities in the north of the country, this conference will take place in a key regional town, Huddersfield in West Yorkshire, located along the ‘Trans-Pennine Corridor’ between Leeds and Manchester.

Through an examination of such issues as environmental sustainability, cultural/civic identity, transportation, health and well-being and social/economic development, the conference will offer a platform for multi-disciplinary debate between academics, policy-makers and practitioners. The conference, which will be hosted by the Centre for Urban Design, Architecture and Sustainability at the University of Huddersfield, is aimed at urban designers, planners, architects, geographers, sociologists, philosophers, policy makers, urban theorists, historians, landscape architects, economists, conservationists, educationalists, health specialists and politicians.

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Wed 3 February 2016

New Publications

Industries of Architecture

Edited by Katie Lloyd Thomas, Tilo Amhoff, Nick Beech

At a time when the technologies and techniques of producing the built environment are undergoing significant change, this book makes central architecture’s relationship to industry. Contributors turn to historical and theoretical questions, as well as to key contemporary developments, taking a humanities approach to the Industries of Architecture that will be of interest to practitioners and industry professionals, as much as to academic researchers, teachers and students. How has modern architecture responded to mass production? How do we understand the necessarily social nature of production in the architectural office and on the building site? And how is architecture entwined within wider fields of production and reproduction—finance capital, the spaces of regulation, and management techniques? What are the particular effects of techniques and technologies (and above all their inter-relations) on those who labour in architecture, the buildings they produce, and the discursive frameworks we mobilise to understand them?

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Fri 5 February 2016

New Courses

Architecture MA

University of Westminster, London

Course web site

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Thu 15 October 2015

MA Architectural History, The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL

The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, London

Course web site

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA in Architectural Design

School of Architecture, University of Sheffield

Course web site

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA in Urban Design

School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield

Course web site

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA Spatial Practices: Art, Architecture, and Performance

University College for the Creative Arts

Course web site

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Thu 24 December 2009

MSc in Architectural History and Theory, University of Edinburgh

Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (ESALA), ECA, University of Edinburgh

Course web site

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Thu 14 May 2015

MSc Urban Studies

University College London

Course web site

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Thu 24 December 2009