AHRA Newsletter:
December 2019-January 2020

If you would like to receive this information by e-mail, and you haven't yet signed up as a member of AHRA, please send an email to the address below. Membership is currently free and is open to all humanities researchers working in Schools of Architecture and related disciplines both in the UK and overseas.

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To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

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The next newsletter will be issued in February 2020.

New Events

Housing and the City

!7th Annual International AHRA Conference

University of Nottingham

November 19 2020 - November 21 2020

In the early twentieth century, a desire to master the workings of the city linked it explicitly to the provision of housing. The processes of ‘the urban’ became an ‘ism’, the multiplication of houses became housing. In the twenty-first century, we are, it seems, witnessing the rise of new modes of urban domesticity – of ‘co-living’ for young urban professionals, of ‘co-housing’ of various kinds, of ‘live-work’ units and of a kind of domesticated working. Sometimes, these trends are born of economic necessity; sometimes, they are driven by aspirations of inclusion, solidarity and sharing. In either case, they are promoted as desirable styles of life, experiments in housing and working that are linked to the promise of a new kind of collectivity, a new kind of city. Our concern is to investigate the link between housing and urbanism, if not to disentangle it, at least to interrogate it, in order to ask what these new forms of living and working might mean for the city and its future.

This conference aims to investigate the historical and theoretical genealogy of the following question: what does it mean to be at home in the city in the twenty-first century, in an age of evolving social and work patterns, increased geographical mobility and climate concern?

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines such as architecture, urbanism, sociology, philosophy, geography, anthropology, as well as written and visual contributions from the arts, such as photography or film to explore this question.

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Thu 19 November 2020

Virtual Traditions: IASTE 2020

THE TRANSIENCE OF TRADITION IN CHANGING GEOGRAPHIES AND GLOBAL LANDSCAPES

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY | NOTTINGHAM, UK

September 03 2020 - September 06 2020

CONFERENCE THEME

Tradition has multiple forms, manifestations, and influences that shape the processes used to produce, transform, preserve, and consume built environments in synch with socio-cultural and economic change. Over the past 30 years, IASTE has helped shape the discourse around the political, cultural, economic, and legal frameworks of tradition. As successive generations hand down building traditions, the endurance of these traditions typically relies on the continuing significance of the built environment to the everyday life of communities, societies, and nations. Yet contemporary societies are increasingly confronted with new forms of communication that are mobile, digital and remote, and hence the very notion of tradition is undergoing a rhetorical transition according to the new global economy and boundary-less conditions of citizenship that are influencing, mobilizing, and manipulating built environments.

With the predominance of mobile communication, social media, and online interaction, the terms “virtual” and “tradition” are no longer at opposite ends of cultural discourse, as they seemed to be a decade ago. Virtual space is developing socio-cultural norms that dictate everyday life, while built environments adapt to virtual events, spaces, and gatherings. IASTE 2020 Nottingham will explore how the mutual influences between the virtual and the traditional reconfigure new structures of communities, societies, and cities — extending and connecting built spaces. In an era defined by social media and online interaction, new agents manipulate traditions, values, myths, borders, and even the legitimacy of the built environment in virtual space. Scientific innovation, data-mining, algorithms, and spatial and digital modeling have thus led to new methods of interpretation and mechanisms of decision-making that force a reconsideration of the link between buildings and people, culture and its consumers.

The organizers of IASTE 2020 Nottingham invite participants to revisit the notion, concepts and practices of tradition at a time when virtual and mobile interaction is increasingly dictating the terms of everyday life, at home, at work, and in the public sphere. Participants will investigate the intellectual dialogue and reciprocal influences at the intersection of physical and virtual landscapes, and reflect on how new methodologies, practices, policies, information technologies, and even the parallel presence of virtual space and cloud communications inform the meaning of tradition in the built environment. By examining alternative futures of tradition, the conference organizers anticipate a progressive inquiry and dialogue regarding the epistemological and philosophical basis of tradition. As in past IASTE conferences, we invite scholars, professionals, and practitioners from architecture, architectural history, urban design, art history, anthropology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, political science, urban studies, conservation, design, digital technologies, and related disciplines to submit papers that address one of the following tracks.

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Thu 3 September 2020

CONNECTIONS: EXPLORING HERITAGE, ARCHITECTURE, CITIES, ART, MEDIA

Call for papers/submissions

Canterbury, UK. University of Kent

June 29 2020 - June 30 2020

Today the digital is ubiquitous across all disciplines connected with life in cities: urban history, architecture, planning, art, design, media, communications, and more. Examples abound.

As the Western world comes to deeper understandings of its heritage in the 21st Century, technology is ever more present in our reading of the past. Data mapping is standard in conservation and social history. Archaeologists use digital tools in geophysics, laser scanning, and compositional analysis. Landscape and architectural visualizations populate museums across the world. In architecture, computational design uses algorithms to replicate biology. Coding produces self-generated architectural form. Information modeling presents planners with interactive design in real time. The city is seen as ‘smart’.

In film and animation, digital models create fictitious places on scales unimagined. Installation artists make space interactive through digitising motion, sound and heat. Projection mapping allows artists to reinterpret the past in-situ. Photographers use digital cameras to document city stories. Marketing, technology and communication mediates the city experience 24/7. In every field, educators are responding.

As the tools we use today merge and blur across disciplines, this conferences asks educators and professionals to consider the following. How can we best manage, direct and utilize the unique potentialities of this interdisciplinary and technological moment? Are we rethinking objects of art and design from the past and future? Are we reconsidering modes of communication, styles of teaching and ways of living? Are we seeing new links between designed objects, visualized spaces and cultural meanings? Are we understanding creative, documentary and media practices in new ways? Are we developing our own knowledge through the technologies, tools or thinking of other disciplines?

Based on this interdisciplinary approach, the conference welcomes educators and professionals in:

Architecture, Urban design, History, Archaeology, Heritage, Art, Design, Technology, Communications, Media, Film, Cultural studies, Pedagogy

Key Dates:

10 Feb 2020: Abstract Submissions (Round One) *   |    20 Feb 2020:  Abstract Feedback

* Round One submissions allow for early review. This is open to all but is particularly useful for international delegates requiring a visa to attend the conference.

Submit: admin@architecturemps.com

For further details, please see the conference website.

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Mon 29 June 2020

The European Architectural History Conference 2020

Call for papers

University of Edinburgh, UK

June 10 2020 - June 13 2020

The call for papers (sessions) and discussion positions (round tables) is now LIVE. The deadline is 20 September 2019, and proposals should be submitted to the Session Chairs, whose details may be found here: https://eahn2020.eca.ed.ac.uk/papers/

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Wed 10 June 2020

Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Forum 12th Symposium

Practice Toward a Future

Fallingwater, Pennsylvania, United States of America

May 27 2020 - May 31 2020

The Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Forum invites participation in its Twelfth Annual Symposium. ACSF 12 will take place in FALLINGWATER (Southwestern Pennsylvania), Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous work, and arguably his finest house. A destination for architects, landscape architects, historians, designers, and artists, as well as the general public, Fallingwater offers a perfect context where to meditate, sense, share, discuss, and even plan new ways of thinking and acting that ultimately define practices to a more constructive and hopeful future.

As in previous symposia, ACSF 12 is structured around a main topic (in this case "Practices Toward a Future") but also open to ideas, works, and proposals relevant to the Forum's areas of interest. Given the attraction of Fallingwater, we will top the number of attendees to a number that secures an atmosphere conducive to personal connections and in-depth dialogue. Optional meditation will be offered each morning and there will free time for connecting to oneself, the surrounding woods, and, of course, Fallingwater. Keynote speakers are Frank Lloyd Wright/sacred space scholar Anat Geva, filmmaker Brent Green, and architectural theoretician David Leatherbarrow. Part of the symposium activities will include a visit to Frank Lloyd Wright’s nearby house Kentuck Knob.

Submission

Interested individuals are invited to submit proposals for either the SYMPOSIUM THEME or an OPEN TOPIC. Proposals may be submitted in one of four categories: panel, project, paper, and workshop. There are different requirements for each type of submissions. Proposals will be blind peer-reviewed by at least three ACSF scholars/professionals. The deadline is February 1st, 2020.

For more details and information, visit: http://www.acsforum.org/symposium2020/ or email ACSF12 symposium co-chairs at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Wed 27 May 2020

Research Encounters via Architecture’s Methods

16th AHRA PhD Student Symposium

Newcastle University, UK

April 22 2020 - April 23 2020

The Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) 16th AHRA PhD Student Symposium 2020, to be hosted by the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, takes as its departure point the tendency for architectural research to be dissected into distinct disciplinary categories, including ‘architectural history’, ‘architectural theory’ and ‘architectural design’. This categorisation implies that architectural research requires methods to be applied from outside of its discipline, rather than conceiving of architectural research as a discipline with its own research methods. How then might we consider our encounters with architectural research in a way that links to our own ways of working and conception of the wider world?

Encountering architectural research in this way means acknowledging that architecture is not only inherently interdisciplinary, but that it is also a field offering its own distinct practices and ways of relating to society and culture. It is such re-thinking that, as this symposium proposes, opens the possibility for architectural research to be situated as a core research discipline. This re-consideration of architectural research is part of an ongoing project conceived by the Architectural Research Collaborative (ARC) at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University.

Some suggested themes that may relate to research encounters via architecture’s methods:

  • Encounters between the interrelated scales of architectural research: from macro to micro; from infrastructures, assemblages, ecologies, buildings to construction details.
  • Encounters within iterative approaches to architectural research that may consider: conversations, specifications, experimentations, prototypes and risk-taking.
  • Encounters between architecture and its relations to social, economic, geographic, cultural, historical, conceptual and material forces and practices.
  • Encounters of projective thinking, that may include: creative practice research methods, processes of translation between drawings and buildings, the imagining of better worlds and speculative futures

Submissions of proposals (one proposal per applicant) are invited from registered PhD candidates in Architecture and its related disciplines. The call is open to students from institutions world-wide and registration for the symposium is free of charge.

The deadline for receipt of all proposals is Friday 20th December 2019.

Please email paper abstracts/workshop proposals to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Successful candidates will be notified by Friday 24th January 2020.

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Wed 22 April 2020

CFP - DRAMATIC ARCHITECTURES

Theatre and Performing Arts in Motion

ESAP Auditorium, Porto, Portugal

April 22 2020 - April 24 2020

Six years after the Dramatic Architectures. Places of Drama – Drama for Spaces International Conference, which brought together about fifty researchers from different countries, we believe that it is time to reopen the debate, looking at how this field of studies has evolved and which are its current main concerns and more recent developments.

Call for Papers deadline: November 12, 2019

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Wed 22 April 2020

Gender and Academic Leadership in Architecture in India

Call for papers

Avani Institute of Design, Calicut

March 21 2020 - March 22 2020

The research symposium on Gender and Academic Leadership in Architecture in India will examine the engagement of women and persons of minoritized genders and sexualities in the construction of the academy, architectural knowledge, professional identity, and academic practice. While the academy in India is often viewed as a softer, more flexible, an almost feminized alternative to practicing professionally for women (who have the culturally pre-ordained role of being the primary carer for the family), or a possible safe space for queer persons (whose bodies and knowledges are otherwise invisibilized or violently erased), academic leadership roles have not been always accessible. Whilst this is now changing, a vast majority of these positions are still being held either by men, or by privileged savarna academics and those with access to intergenerational wealth and social networks. 

The symposium is interested in feminist forms of leadership. Even though we will be looking for alternatives to patriarchal conventions of leadership, we will not ignore the positions of power sanctified by institutional designations. The intent of the symposium is to bring recognition to teaching and research as practice; highlight and discuss structural changes needed to empower co-faculty and students to be in preparation for the next generation of academic leaders; and add focus to the importance of mentoring and reflective praxis. 

We invite 300-word abstracts that are critical, honest, fearless inquiries and/or disclosures of your anti-patriarchal experiences in architecture academia. Submissions should take the form of a polemical piece, a poem, a professional and personal story, or an academic paper and each modality of inquiry should be developed as a form of scholarship. Presentations can be 20 min papers, or 10 min lighting talks. The evaluation criteria will be 1) relevance to the symposium premise; 2) positioning in contemporary, global scholarship on the topic; and 3) originality, criticality and integrity of the account/story/argument/position.

 

Symposium: March 21-22, 2020

Abstract Deadline: Monday, 16 December, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Announcement of Abstract Acceptance: 13 January, 2020

Abstract Length: 300 words

Bio Length: 100 words

Please submit the abstract as a Word Document to Dr. Anuradha Chatterjee  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) with cc to Prof Madhavi Desai at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and Dr. Kush Patel (they/he) at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


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Sat 21 March 2020

Divergence in Architectural Research: international doctorate symposium

Call for papers

Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture, Atlanta, USA

March 05 2020 - March 06 2020

Divergence in Architectural Research is an international doctorate symposium organized by the ConCave Ph.D. Student Group in the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture. The Ph.D. Symposium seeks to create a platform for sharing current research in architecture, with invited scholars and other doctoral students from architecture and allied fields. The symposium will engage the divergent aspects of architectural research as it is taking place today across epistemological frameworks, highlighting the emerging intersections in the below- mentioned topics:

  1. Architectural History, Theory, and Society

  2. Architecture, Culture, and Behavior

  3. Design Methods, Computing, and Production

  4. Design Technologies, Data and Performance

  5. Urban studies, Systems and Ecologies

We invite papers by doctoral students to present their ongoing research and hope to expand the conversation around the state of agency in architecture research today.

Please submit your paper abstract (500 words max.) with a short biographical note (150 words max.) on the symposium website.

Submission Opens: May 27, 2019
Deadline for Abstract Submission: September 7, 2019

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Thu 5 March 2020

The Earth as Client

AIARG All-Ireland Architecture Research Group Ninth Annual Conference

Limerick, Ireland

January 23 2020 - January 24 2020

“We see the earth as Client. This brings with it long-lasting responsibilities.” Few have expressed the urgency of a collective and collaborative effort on a global scale as succinctly as curators Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara in their FREESPACE MANIFESTO for the 2018 Architecture Biennale in Venice.

The AIARG annual conference promotes innovative academic research as well as the practice, pedagogy and progress of architecture in the widest sense. We invite contributions from researchers, practitioners, theoreticians and pedagogues of architecture, and from those of other disciplines working within and around the interests of architecture. We welcome papers that consider the impact, contribution and responsibilities of architecture.

Please submit abstracts (300 words or less) along with your contact details and a short biography (100 words) to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 21 October 2019 latest.

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Thu 23 January 2020

AHRA climate statement

December 02 2019

climate statement

In light of the global ecological crisis, the Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) is declaring a climate emergency.  As an international architectural research association, we acknowledge and support the various declarations on climate change that are starting to emerge, and we will endeavour to foreground environmental and social justice in our activities and approaches.

Architecture and urbanism are critical to the history of the planetary environmental crisis, yet also to the earth's possible futures. Responses to the crisis are needed from different aspects of the discipline, including those from practice and from schools of architecture, as we have seen.

The architectural research community is crucial to these struggles, and the AHRA is committed to supporting and promoting critical, inter-disciplinary, experimental research that seeks to understand past architectures and propose ways to act beyond the technical, employing ecological thinking towards new politics and relations. We engage with architectural humanities that open to the non-human, with the planet and other species.

December 2019

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Mon 2 December 2019

New Publications

Architecture and Feminisms Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

Edited by Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting

Set against the background of a ‘general crisis’ that is environmental, political and social, this book examines a series of specific intersections between architecture and feminisms, understood in the plural. The collected essays and projects that make up the book follow transversal trajectories that criss-cross between ecologies, economies and technologies, exploring specific cases and positions in relation to the themes of the archive, control, work and milieu. This collective intellectual labour can be located amidst a worldwide depletion of material resources, a hollowing out of political power and the degradation of constructed and natural environments. Feminist positions suggest ways of ethically coping with a world that is becoming increasingly unstable and contested. The many voices gathered here are united by the task of putting critical concepts and feminist design tools to use in order to offer experimental approaches to the creation of a more habitable world. Drawing inspiration from the active archives of feminist precursors, existing and re-imagined, and by way of a re-engagement in the histories, theories and projected futures of critical feminist projects, the book presents a collection of twenty-three essays and eight projects, with the aim of taking stock of our current condition and re-engaging in our precarious environment-worlds.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Becoming a Feminist Architect

Karin Reisinger and Meike Schalk

This issue is one of three publications subsequent to the 13th International Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) Conference “Architecture & Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies,” which was held at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm, between the 17th to 19th November in 2016.1 The conference gathered around 200 participants and included over a hundred paper presentations and performances, as well as two exhibitions. The overwhelming interest in reviving the feminist discourse in architecture gave us the opportunity to reflect on the process of becoming feminist architects. Becoming a feminist architectis a complex process, rife with strategies, tactics, frictions, advances and retreats, that will continue to engage us in the future as it does now. This became clear through the presentations of a wide range of different feminist architectural practices, both historical and contemporary, their diverse theoretical underpinnings and methodological reflections and speculations. The present publication assembles a series of vital discussions that emerged at the event, including accounts of careful and creative ways of becoming feminist architects by “knowing and doing otherwise,”2 “practising ‘otherwise’,”3 or doing architecture in other ways,4the implication of which is a rethinking and expansion of the conventional scope of architectural practice. With these three publications – this edition of Field Journal, the Architecture and Culture issue “Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects,” and the anthology Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies – we have made an effort to create space for as many of the voices and positions present at the conference as possible.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Architecture, Festival and the City

Edited by Jemma Browne, Christian Frost, Ray Lucas

Historically the urban festival served as an occasion for affirming shared convictions and identities in the life of the city. Whether religious or civic in nature, these events provided tangible expressions of social, cultural, political, and religious cohesion, often reaffirming a particular shared ethos within diverse urban landscapes. Architecture has long served as a key aspect of this process exhibiting continuity in the flux of these representations through the parading of elaborate ceremonial floats, the construction of temporary buildings, the ‘dressing’ of existing urban space, the alternative occupations of the everyday, and the construction of new buildings and spaces which then become a part of the background fabric of the city.

This book examines how festivals can be used as a lens to examine the relationship between city and citizen and questions whether this is fixed through time, or has been transformed as a response to changes in the modern urban condition. Architecture, Festival and the City looks at the multilayered nature of a diverse selection of festivals and the way they incorporate both orderly (authoritative) and disorderly (subversive) components. The aim is to reveal how the civic nature of urban space is utilised through festival to represent ideas of belonging and identity. Recent political and social gatherings also raise questions about the relationship of these events to ‘ritual’ and whether traditional practices can serve as meaningful references in the twenty-first century.

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Fri 21 December 2018

Architecture and the Smart City

Sergio M. Figueiredo, Sukanya Krishnamurthy, Torsten Schroeder (Eds)

Increasingly the world around us is becoming ‘smart.’ From smart meters to smart production, from smart surfaces to smart grids, from smart phones to smart citizens. ‘Smart’ has become the catch-all term to indicate the advent of a charged technological shift that has been propelled by the promise of safer, more convenient and more efficient forms of living. Most architects, designers, planners and politicians seem to agree that the smart transition of cities and buildings is in full swing and inevitable. However, beyond comfort, safety and efficiency, how can ‘smart design and technologies’ assist to address current and future challenges of architecture and urbanism?

Architecture and the Smart City provides an architectural perspective on the emergence of the smart city and offers a wide collection of resources for developing a better understanding of how smart architecture, smart cities and smart systems in the built environment are discussed, designed and materialized. It brings together a range of international thinkers and practitioners to discuss smart systems through four thematic sections: ‘Histories and Futures’, ‘Agency and Control’, ‘Materialities and Spaces’ and ‘Networks and Nodes’. Combined, these four thematic sections provide different perspectives into some of the most pressing issues with smart systems in the built environment.

The book tackles questions related to the future of architecture and urbanism, lessons learned from global case studies and challenges related to interdisciplinary research, and critically examines what the future of buildings and cities will look like.

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Mon 2 December 2019

A Biographical Dictionary of the Architects of Greater Manchester: 1800-1940

David Astbury, David French, Neil Darlington et al

Created under the auspices of the Manchester Group of the Victorian Society, the Dictionary of Greater Manchester Architects (DGMA) is a database providing biographical information and details of commissions awarded for all architects known to have been born, trained, lived, or worked in Greater Manchester between 1800 and 1940.

The resource is searchable by name or location of architect, practice, or building. Architects based in the Greater Manchester area have their known works catalogued as fully as possible; Details of architects based elsewhere in the United Kingdom are included insofar as their commissions relate to the Greater Manchester area.

Likewise, the works of architects who were born or trained in Manchester but practiced elsewhere in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth, and the USA are less comprehensively catalogued The DGMA does not claim to be definitive, nor does it attempt to make value judgments. Its purpose has been to assemble known published data in a searchable form easily available to all and to provide a key to further research. DGMA is a work in progress and additional biographical information is being added. Comments and corrections are welcome.

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Mon 2 December 2019

New Courses

KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING PhD SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES 2020/21

KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING, UK

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Mon 2 December 2019

PhD ‘TACK / Communities of Tacit Knowledge: Architecture and its Ways of Knowing’

participating academic institutions (see details of call)

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Fri 1 November 2019