AHRA Newsletter:
August-September 2017

If you would like to receive this information by e-mail, and you haven't yet signed up as a member of AHRA, please follow the link to the AHRA website for details of how to register on the database. Membership is currently free and is open to all humanities researchers working in Schools of Architecture and related disciplines both in the UK and overseas. Please also encourage colleagues to register here: http://www.ahra-architecture.org/registration/

If you are planning a research event that you would like to promote through the newsletter, please log in to the AHRA website and post the details by clicking on the 'Post Your Event' link under the 'Events' menu. These details will appear on the 'Future Events' page within a few days (subject to moderation) and will also be included in the next issue of the Newsletter. If you have not logged in to the site before, you should enter your default username ('firstnamelastname') and click on the 'forgotten your password' link for further instructions.

To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The next newsletter will be issued in October 2017

used echo chainsaw New Events

Colin Rowe Lecture Series: Guy Tillim used echo chainsaw

used echo chainsaw RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London W1B 1AD

October 31 2020

In an informal setting and in dialogue with experienced and imaginative guests, The Colin Rowe Lectures aim to discuss the role of the image in architecture, particularly the crucial role of architectural photography. The lectures are considered as an open forum of discussion for architects, photographers, students and the simply curious. All are welcome.

We are delighted to announce that our next lecture will be delivered by acclaimed South-African photographer Guy Tillim. Tillim started photographing professionally in 1986, working with the Afrapix collective until 1990. His work as a freelance photographer in South Africa for the local and foreign media included positions with Reuters between 1986 and 1988, and Agence France Presse in 1993 and 1994.Tillim has received many awards for his work, and is the 2017 recipient of the HCB Award presented by Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson. Solo exhibitions have taken place at several institutions internationally; the 2014 Barbican exhibition Constructing Worlds: Photography and Architecture in the Modern World included Tillim’s work on the Congolese city of Kinshasa and its late-modernist colonial buildings.

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Sat 31 October 2020

Atmosphere: Fabrications used echo chainsaw

Symposium

used echo chainsaw University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

February 01 2018 - February 03 2018

We invite proposals for 20-minute paper presentations and/or temporary installations exploring Fabrications via one of the following four sub-themes: Social Fabrics, Mediating Fabrics, Fabricating in situ, and Fabricating Truth.

 

 

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Thu 1 February 2018

All Ireland Architecture Research Group (AIARG) 7: res publica icici credit card against car loan

follow link Queen’s University, Belfast

January 25 2018 - January 26 2018

The seventh annual conference of the All Ireland Architecture Research Group (AIARG 7) seeks to explore the relationship between architecture and the public realm. The term res publica defines a public affair and architecture is necessarily the most public of the arts: to engage in architecture is to engage in a public discourse. The relationship between architecture and its publics is a complicated one. A public art requires reciprocity between the public and private realms but much of the built environment is designed and built for and by private individuals. Yet the process of design, even for a private commission, is also potentially a public act in that it establishes a collective forum, a sort of res publica as a thing held in common by many people. So where does the public aspect of architecture reside and how is it calibrated?

We imagine that papers could address multiple questions, including, but not limited to:

  • -  How does the contemporary culture of architecture, defined by its discourses of practice, theory and pedagogy, respond to or embody the varying public attributes of architecture?

  • -  How has the changing nature of the public sphere through history impacted on the built environment?

  • -  Can there be or has there even been a public of architects – in the meaning of a body, collective, a generality – if so what did it or does it look like and what could it do?

- How can public be defined for architecture? How can this public be constituted such that it is inclusive of minorities in society?

The conference is an opportunity to reconsider the on-going relevance and impact of architecture through its discourses and, in turn, their ability to shape the public realm not only physically but also intellectually. In this it provides a companion to some of the aspirations of Grafton Architects’ curatorial proposals for the 2018 Venice biennale.

Unlike recent years AIARG 7 commences with a call for papers rather than sessions. We welcome proposals on the theme of the architecture public from practicing architects, theoreticians, pedagogues and others. We particularly welcome proposals for alternate media, those that may step outside an academic milieu and into a public one: roundtable discussions, performances, exhibitions, etc. Please send abstracts (limited to one per individual) of not more that 350 words to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) no later than 8 September 2017. A selection of papers from the conference will be invited to submit to building material, the peer-reviewed journal of the Architectural Association of Ireland.

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Thu 25 January 2018

Activism at Home: Architects’ own houses as sites of resistance homelite xl textron chainsaw

Call for papers

http://kacperhamilton.com/?q=america-cash-loan The University of Manchester, UK

January 15 2018 - January 16 2018

The event is co-organised by Isabelle Doucet (University of Manchester) and Janina Gosseye (University of Queensland).

More details can be found on the PDF, and the event website.

Paper proposals via a 300-word abstract and a one-page CV to the conference organisers:

Isabelle Doucet: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Janina Gosseye: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)



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Mon 15 January 2018

The Tools of the Architect follow link

EAHN European Architectural History Network International Thematic Conference

TU Delft and Het Nieuwe Instituut Rotterdam, The Netherlands

November 22 2017 - November 24 2017

Architects have for their activities of drawing, writing and building always depended upon the potential of particular tools –ranging from practical instruments such as straight edges, French curves, compasses, rulers and pencils to conceptual tools such as working drawings, collages, photographic surveys, infographics, diagrams, casts and mass models.

As technologies advanced the toolbox of architects has changed and expanded. Today architects have an extraordinary array of sophisticated tools at their disposal but also rely on many of same tools as their 18th and 19th century peers. Working drawings, pencils and tracing paper continue to appear in the designer’s studio while their role and potential is being redefined.

Time and time again, architects have engaged with new tools. The quest to find the most appropriate and adequate tools to articulate, test and communicate design ideas has never ended, and in this pursuit architects have appropriated tools from other disciplines, such as art, historiography, sociology, philosophy, computer sciences and engineering. Out of this perspective the tools of the architect have become a field of intense exploration of the encounter of architecture with other disciplinary perspectives.

Inventions and innovations of tools throughout history have not only provided better answers to questions of analyzing and representing the built environment, but they have also pointed to new ways of conceiving and intervening. Ellipsographs made it possible to precisely draw an elliptical space in the 19th century and computer-aided drafting software has allowed for a new conception and construction of complex geometries in the 20th and 21st century. New tools have continuously affected the imagination, character and qualities of architectural projects.

This conference wants to focus on the changing practical and conceptual tools of the architect and their effect on the logos and praxis of architecture.

We welcome papers that consider the tools of the architect from this threefold perspective. Papers should be based on well-documented research that is primarily analytical and interpretative rather than descriptive in nature.

Abstracts (of 500 words) can be registered and uploaded on toolsofarchitect.com

Abstract submission deadline: 15 May 2017

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Wed 22 November 2017

Building the Scottish Diaspora

Scots and the Colonial Built Environment, c.1700-1920

Edinburgh

November 17 2017 - November 18 2017

The Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies (University of Edinburgh), in conjunction with the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, is to host a two-day symposium (17-18 November 2017) on Scottish contributions to the built environment of Britain’s empire.

 

This event will ask questions about Scottish involvement and agency in the creation of the buildings and infrastructure that both facilitated and maintained Britain’s global empire.

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Fri 17 November 2017

Architecture, Festival and the City

14th AHRA International Conference

School of Architecture and Design, Birmingham City University, UK

November 16 2017 - November 18 2017

What is ritual in today’s rationalistic, post-symbolic age?
What forms of collective participation can the civic realm sustain in the twenty-first century?
Can there be any meaningful form of collective representation in our predominantly individualistic and globalised society?
Are urban festivals, carnivals and rituals fundamentally inclusive or exclusive?

These questions, amongst others, will serve as points of reference for this conference which examines past and present urban festivals and their settings in relation to the idea of ‘the good city’.

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Thu 16 November 2017

digital cultural heritage symposium UCL November 2017

University College London, Stratford

November 13 2017 - November 15 2017

digital cultural heritage: FUTURE VISIONS 2017 London Symposium, UCL November 13-15

We are pleased to announce digital cultural heritage: FUTURE VISIONS 2017 symposium to be held on November 13-15 2017, at University College London, hosted by the Bartlett Real Estate Institute and supported by the Architecture Theory Criticism History research centre and The University of Queensland. 

This symposium is designed to encourage critical debate across a wide range of heritage-related disciplines. We welcome papers from practitioners and academics working in cultural heritage and related fields such as architecture, anthropology, archaeology, geography, media studies, museum studies and tourism. We particularly encourage papers that explore the challenges of digitising tangible and intangible cultural heritage, those that identify issues with digitisation and digital interaction, and those that address the theoretical challenges posed by digital cultural heritage.

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Mon 13 November 2017

AA Women & Architecture in Context 1917-2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Architectural Association School of Architecture in London

November 02 2017 - November 04 2017

AA XX 100 is the project to commemorate the centenary of women’s admission to the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London in 1917. To date it has comprised a raft of complementary enterprises including an annual lecture series and an ongoing programme to conduct filmed interviews with AA alumnae. The project culminates in autumn 2017 with an exhibition (October - December 2017), a book (Breaking the Mould: AA Women in Architecture 1917-2017) and an international conference (AA Women and Architecture in Context 1917-2017) run in partnership with the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

We now announce the Call for Papers for the conference, which will take place between 2nd and 4th November 2017 at the AA and the Paul Mellon Centre in Bedford Square, London, W.C.1.

We invite academics, architects and other practitioners to submit proposals for 20-minute papers in response to the themes listed on the attached poster. Submissions are encouraged from researchers at all stages of their careers, and papers should be understood as not confined purely to the AA as a subject matter but equally to the wider context of women and architecture across the centenary period.

Format:

Paper proposals should be 300 words in length; please include contact details, affiliation and a brief CV.

Poster proposals should be up to 300 words in length; please include contact details, affiliation and a brief CV.

Both should be emailed to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Deadline for proposals is 12.12.16, for notification no later than January 2017. Successful applicants will be expected to cover their own costs for travel and accommodation but will have free entry to the conference.

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Thu 2 November 2017

Building Beauty

Ecologic Design and Construction Process

Naples, Italy

October 16 2017 - May 05 2017

Building Beauty is an intensive, memorable experience of studies team work and life in the heart of the city of Naples, Italy.

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Mon 16 October 2017

Building Beauty. Ecologic Design and Construction Process

Naples, Italy

October 16 2017

The program is practice-based, offering an immersive experience of hands-on construction that links together self development, ecological thinking and building skills: students learn low-tech construction and decoration techniques over an intensive, fully human, feeling-based building process. Learning is organized in three axis: 1. Construction and Cultivation; 2. Seminars: leading international scholars from a wide range of scientific fields explore with students the potential of a truly interdisciplinary approach to design and construction where complexity and uncertainty are the positive condition of beauty generation; speakers tackle important challenges in the current international agenda of sustainable architecture and resilient communities. 3. Self, Community and Space: practical movement/art/dance/therapy workshops aimed at recognizing and trust our feelings in relation to space. Feelings are referred to space, the body-mind, and the way they interact in hands-on physical work of making.

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Mon 16 October 2017

The Open Hand 2: Orientalism in the Pacific

Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

September 09 2017

During The Open Hand 2: Orientalism in the Pacific, we want to resume the civic debate started during the first Open Hand symposium in 2014, about collaborative action in architecture, space, art and society, this time specifically in connection with community, geography, identity, displacement, migration, and history in the Pacific. Central to the symposium are the following questions: What are the opportunities, boundaries, and tensions experienced in diasporas here in the Pacific? Do we still view these phenomena through the lenses of the ‘Other,' or as exotic spaces of in-betweenness, or are we engaging with them differently now?

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Sat 9 September 2017

Post Doc: University of Reading, School of Arts and Communication Design Department

: Typography & Graphic Communication

University of Reading, UK

September 08 2017 - September 08 2017

IDAPPS is an inter-disciplinary project bringing together academics and practitioners in graphic and information design, architecture, ergonomics and human factors, and pharmacy to consider how to support one of the strategic aims of the UK 5-Year Antimicrobial Resistance strategy 2013-18: how to ‘improve the knowledge and understanding of antimicrobial resistance’.

IDAPPS introduces ‘persuasive space’ in thinking about the presentation of information, its situation within an environment, and how users interact with it, in the context of a community pharmacy. Community pharmacies are socially inclusive and convenient, and today play a key role in delivering public health. They are places where people wait for prescriptions to be filled or to see a pharmacist, and offer a persuasive space to raise awareness of the dangers of Anti-Microbial Resistance.

The post is offered full-time for 13 months, and is based in the world-leading Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading. You will work with a team comprising academics in information and user-centred design, architecture and the built environment, and pharmacy; and non-academic partners, Design Science (a science communication agency) and Day Lewis (a chain of community pharmacies). IDAPPS is an exciting and innovative project which is funded as a pump-priming initiative, so there will be opportunity to contribute ideas to the development and planning of future work in this area. You will need to be flexible and adaptable and be able to work under your own initiative.

Contact: Prof. Sue Walker

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Fri 8 September 2017

Interstices Journal of Architecture and Related Arts: Call for student research projects

Call for Postgraduate Creative Design Research Projects

New Zealand

September 04 2017

INTERSTICES: Journal of Architecture and Related Arts

Issues 18 & 19 - Call for Postgraduate Creative 

 Design Research Projects

 

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Mon 4 September 2017

EDMOND & CORRIGAN + PETER CORRIGAN INFLUENCE

RMIT Swanston Academic Building | Room 80.02.007, 445 Swanston St, Melbourne

August 26 2017 - August 26 2017

This event will see current and former RMIT Architecture staff and students as well as our wider community of practice present a series of end-to-end 8 minute presentations that speak to the influence of Edmond & Corrigan + Professor Peter Corrigan through the discussion of a specific Edmond & Corrigan project. The event will also speculate on future trajectories for the ideas discussed.

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Sat 26 August 2017

Re-City 2017: “(Im)Possible Cities”

2nd International City Regeneration Congress

Tampere, Finland

August 24 2017 - August 25 2017

Tampere University of Technology and University of Tampere in Finland welcome you to Re-City 2017, the 2nd International City Regeneration Congress, under the theme "(Im)Possible Cities". The congress will be arranged in Tampere, Finland, on 24 – 25 August 2017. It provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers, students and practitioners in the fields of urban planning, architecture, traffic planning and logistics, ecology, urban history, informatics, health sciences, economics and business, political sciences, social sciences and humanities.

The deadline for the call for abstracts is 15 April 2017. 

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Thu 24 August 2017

New Publications

Architecture and Capitalism – Solids and Flows: Vol. 5, Issue 2

Catharina Gabrielsson and Helena Mattsson (Editors)

‘Capitalism is back!’

Nancy Fraser, “Behind Marx’s Hidden Abode: For an Expanded Conception of Capitalism”, New Left Review 86 (2014) p. 55

 

The aim of this issue of Architecture and Culture is to revisit the relationship between architecture and capitalism, not by reverting back to ‘critique’, ‘post-criticality’ or even ‘resistance’, but from an outset of addressing their complex relationality. Going beyond the historic, industrial and building-based scenario offered by Peggy Deamer (ed.) in Architecture and Capitalism (2014), extending on and problematizing both architecture and capitalism allows us to address this relationship from other perspectives. We propose a thematic heading of ‘solids and flows’ to open up for less predictable, essentially non-linear, and more imaginary investigations.

Solids – which is how architecture most readily is perceived, as tied to buildings, symbolic and semiotic capital, manifestations of private or public wealth … but equally capturing the inaccessibility of corporate power; the ‘trust’ of credit ratings that certify risk-taking in the bank and finance sector; the closure and immovability of capital locked up in tax havens and offshore financial centres.

Flows – as in the fickle movements of global capitalism through networks of finance and speculation (and the arbitrary effects of their hitting the ground)… but equally capturing recent re-orientations in architecture towards relational or ecologist approaches, undoing the physical object, with an emphasis on process, agency and affect. Spanning across the virtual and the real, the material and the immaterial, the relationship between architecture and capitalism increases in complexity as regards to the production of identity, the generation of desire, and the forging of spatial relations. By juxtaposing solids and flows as tropes or figures of thought, we envisage the possibility for new and transversal connections; ones that, by exposing the gaps, discontinuities and ruptures in, through and between architecture and capitalism carry the potential for non-determinate futures.

 

Call for papers for this issue

From this outset, we invite rigorously speculative, purposely imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating contributions that explore architecture and capitalism from unexpected angles – bearing in mind the slippery slope of too-narrowly confined definitions. This call is explicitly trans- and cross-disciplinary in nature, encouraging critical and emerging scholarship dealing with capitalist studies to engage with architecture as a tradition of projecting, shaping, assessing and experiencing the built environment; and scholars and practitioners in architecture and neighbouring disciplines to relate more closely to the dynamics of capitalism and its current transfigurations, brought to the fore through the advent of concepts and theories such as noologi, affective or immaterial labour, economies of debt, new Marxist scholarship, and neo-materialist ontologies. How can we think about these conjunctions of materialisation and immaterialisation, visibility and invisibility, solidification and vaporization? How can they be analysed, illustrated, represented, designed or described? We call for papers, essays, manifestos, historical inquires, fieldwork notes, photographic compilations, drawing materials etc. that address this broad and fluid topic in creative and original ways.

Contributions might address the following themes:

  • Processes and techniques of commodification and marketization in architecture
  • Dimensions of value(s) in and through architecture, alternative values, and ‘value diremption’ (the ‘Other’ of value)   
  • Theories on the spectacular, affect/affective and experiential in architecture and their potential for generating the unexpected
  • The spatial, material and localized conditions for central agents in global capitalism (bank and finance sector, corporate HQ, digital platforms etc.)
  • The relationship between design, housing tenures and property ownership
  • The architectural imports of spatial occupancy and appropriation
  • Dispossession, austerity and the architecture of poverty
  • Thickened and thinned out spaces, secondary homes, and non-habitation
  • Real estate-driven architectures of affect

 

Contributions can range from short observations or manifestos, creative pieces, or visual essays, to longer academic articles. Architecture and Culture is published in both on-line and hard-copy formats: there is capacity to host on-line contributions that operate in a different way to paper-based work.

 

Production schedule

CfP                             May 2016

Response                  1 September 2016 at latest

Editors selection     October 2016

Peer Reviewing       October-December 2016

Authors Revisions  December- February 2017

Editorial checking  March 2017

Copy to publisher   1 April 2017

Issue publication    July 2017

 

For author instructions, please go to ‘Instructions for Authors’ at

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rfac20&page=instructions#.VzRvBmN7BHg

 

Upload submissions at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/archcult/

Or via ‘submit online’ at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rfac

 

If you have any queries or require further information, please contact:

Catharina Gabrielsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Helena Mattsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Mon 16 May 2016

This Thing Called Theory

Teresa Stoppani, Giorgio Ponzo, George Themistokleous

In the age of post-digital architecture and digital materiality, This Thing Called Theory explores current practices of architectural theory, their critical and productive role. The book is organized in sections which explore theory as an open issue in architecture, as it relates to and borrows from other disciplines, thus opening up architecture itself and showing how architecture is inextricably connected to other social and theoretical practices.

The sections move gradually from the specifics of architectural thought – its history, theory, and criticism – and their ongoing relation with philosophy, to the critical positions formulated through architecture’s specific forms of expression, and onto more recent forms of architecture’s engagement and self-definition. The book’s thematic sessions are concluded by and interspersed with a series of shorter critical position texts, which, together, propose a new vision of the contemporary role of theory in architecture. What emerges, overall, is a critical and productive role for theory in architecture today: theory as a proposition, theory as task and as a ‘risk’ of architecture.

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Wed 30 November 2016

Shadow-Makers: a cultural history of shadows in architecture

Stephen Kite

The making of shadows is an act as old as architecture itself. From the gloom of the medieval hearth through to the masterworks of modernism, shadows have been an essential yet neglected presence in architectural history.

Shadow-Makers
tells for the first time the history of shadows in architecture. It weaves together a rich narrative – combining close readings of significant buildings both ancient and modern with architectural theory and art history – to reveal the key places and moments where shadows shaped architecture in distinctive and dynamic ways. It shows how shadows are used as an architectural instrument of form, composition, and visual effect, while also exploring the deeper cultural context – tracing differing conceptions of their meaning and symbolism, whether as places of refuge, devotion, terror, occult practice, sublime experience or as metaphors of the unconscious.

Within a chronological framework encompassing medieval, baroque, enlightenment, sublime, picturesque, and modernist movements, a wide range of topics are explored, from Hawksmoor's London churches, Japanese temple complexes and the shade-patterns of Islamic cities, to Ruskin in Venice and Aldo Rossi and Louis Kahn in the 20th century. This beautifully-illustrated study seeks to understand the work of these shadow-makers through their drawings, their writings, and through the masterpieces they built.

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Mon 21 August 2017

Growing Compact: Urban Form, Density and Sustainability

Steffen Lehmann

Growing Compact: Urban Form, Density and Sustainability explores and unravels the phenomena, links and benefits between density, compactness and the sustainability of cities. It looks at the socio-climatic implications of density and takes a more holistic approach to sustainable urbanism by understanding the correlations between the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the city, and the challenges and opportunities with density. The book presents contributions from internationally well-known scholars, thinkers and practitioners whose theoretical and practical works address city planning, urban and architectural design for density and sustainability at various levels, including challenges in building resilience against climate change and natural disasters, capacity and integration for growth and adaptability, ageing, community and security, vegetation, food production, compact resource systems and regeneration.

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Mon 21 August 2017