AHRA Newsletter:
August-September 2018

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The next newsletter will be issued in October 2018

New Events

Architecture & Collective Life: Figures, Forms, Densities

16th Annual AHRA International Conference

University of Dundee

November 21 2019 - November 23 2019

Origins, Scales, Technologies, Hierarchies, Distributions, Connectivity, Space

full details, website, and calls for papers to follow

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Thu 21 November 2019

Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain, CfP October 22, 2018, Conference October 10-11, 2019

Masters and Disciples; Women at the Bauhaus; The Other Avant-gardes, the Time of the Bauhaus; New Ways of Living, from the Dwelling to the City; Questions of Pedagogy; Mediation over Technology, Crafts versus Industrialization; Encounters between Art and Architecture; Bauhaus Networks; Historiography, Critique and Controversies

Madrid. ILE, Institución Libre de Enseñanza

October 10 2019 - October 11 2019

The Association of historians of Architecture and Urban Design (AhAU) invites researchers and scholars to present their contributions to the Conference Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain. The conference will have an interdisciplinary character, and it will be opened to those questions and areas of knowledge related to the addressed theme.

The paper proposals will be exclusively individual and their extension will have a minimum of 700 and a maximum of 1000 words. They will need to indicate the selected question, and they will be accompanied by two representative images, a selected bibliography, and a brief CV of the author (maximum extension of two pages).

Rather than a numerous collection of contributions, the aim of the Conference is again to awake a series of engaged debates on the different questions that articulate the proposed theme.

October 22, 2018 DEADLINE TO SUBMIT A PAPER ABSTRACT

October 10-11, 2019 Celebration of the II International Conference AhAU, Madrid

Communication with the general chairs and the submission of proposals and final papers will be made through the following address: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Keynote Speakers: Magdalena Droste, Juan José Lahuerta

General Chairs: Laura Martínez de Guereñu, Carolina B. García Estévez

 

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Thu 10 October 2019

Distance Looks Back

A Thematic Conference of the European Architectural History Network, held in conjunction with the 36th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand

University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning

July 10 2019 - July 13 2019

Distance is both conceptual and actual. It is overcome or exploited in all manner of ways that have consequences for the history of architecture. It is fostered in the critical attitude. And collapsed when history is invoked in the present. It shapes the relationship of Europe to its Antipodes, as well as of Europe to its neighbours. Its presence is necessary for claims upon disciplinarity; its absence, the dissolution of disciplinary boundaries. In what ways has distance figured in the history of architecture? What has it altered? What has it prevented? What has it allowed? What does it permit, even now?

This theme opens the door to questions of representation and communication in the history of architecture; questions of travel and migration; and of the mobility of expertise, institutions and ideas. As a lens, distance allows us to reflect on the construction of identity in and through architectural works both defined as such (Architects and Architecture) and “grey”. It invites us to consider moments of counterpoint, imaging or critique. It provokes us to clarify, recalibrate, expose, suppress, or legitimise. Works, projects, architects and other agents in the conceptualisation and construction of architecture, cities and landscapes are, from a remove, perceived on terms different from the immediate and the close. Artefacts and ideas subjected to distance acquire something of this perspective, whether they are physically moved or subject to representation at a remove. Distance can be inconvenient; and useful.

We welcome original papers that explore the import of distance for architectural history from any direction. Proposals may treat any time and geography. They might address the consequences of literal distance for architectural culture in its history: communication, travel, mobility, isolation, exile, or technical and intellectual networks. They might consider the figurative role of distance in forms of criticality, historicity and thought. Papers may reflect on the mechanisms and nature of architectural history through such concepts as immediacy, instrumentality or relevance; or of neutralization or obsolescence. Contributions might use an idea of distance to think through distinctions (in disciplines, practices or institutions) between architectural history and criticism, architectural history and archaeology, architectural history and area studies, architectural history, urban history, histories of science and technology, the history of art, etc. Or to use these distinctions to reflect on architecture and its neighbouring professions and practices. Papers may reflect on the devices used by architectural historiography to manage distance: historiographical and critical nomenclature; theoretical terms and tropes; and other means of negotiating proximity. Consideration may even be given to the very historiographical valence of distance – as, for instance, productive criticality or problematic estrangement.

One strand of this conference theme responds to the special issue of Architectural Histories (2018) asking “What is Europe?”. The theme invokes, too, the ideas at the centre of the lecture series convened by New Zealand historian Keith Sinclair in 1960: Distance Looks Our Way; and in Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey’s Tyranny of Distance (1966). What are the effects of remoteness on an antipodean response to architecture’s historical metropole? Or of the significance of the globe beyond its “centres”? What occurs when isolation is made operative? The idea of distance, in this sense, invites self-reflection as much as advancement of new knowledge. We therefore particularly welcome papers that reflect on distance in order to reflect on the concept of Europe and the European and its consequences for architecture beyond a strictly defined European geography. We welcome, too, papers that consider the architectural history and culture of Asia, Australasia and the Pacific in their global contexts. The program will have sessions dedicated to these themes.

The convenors will be pleased to receive information concerning events or exhibitions scheduled or planned for the dates around this conference, including conferences in major hub cities or other cities in Australia or New Zealand that might interest delegates travelling from afar. The conference website will include a calendar of these events.

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Wed 10 July 2019

Architecture and Light – 2019 SAHGB symposium – CALL FOR PAPERS

St George’s Bloomsbury, and the Soane Museum, London

June 22 2019 - June 22 2019

From the glittering windows of Hardwick Hall and the severe shadows of the Trellick Tower, to the poetry of Chandigarh and the brash neon of Las Vegas, light is a defining factor in any form of architectural design.

This symposium will coincide with two exhibitions at Sir John Soane’s Museum: one on ‘Soane and Light’ and another – as yet untitled – with a leading contemporary light artist working in sympathy with the spaces of the Museum. As such the theme of this symposium is ‘architecture and light’ and thereby focuses on the presence, use and meaning of light in architectural design across all periods and styles.

One important starting point will be the notion that, just as light is understood scientifically as a wave- particle duality, in architecture light exists and functions as both a natural and cultural phenomenon. While on the one hand, the way (sun)light falls over a building is arguably architecture at its most elemental, how we view those light effects is always culturally conditioned. The symposium will reflect, develop and challenge this dualism.

We welcome speakers – both established and emerging – considering this subject in all aspects of architectural production. Some of the topics that papers might consider are:

  • Light as a functional element in architecture and its interactions with different materials and construction methodologies.

  • The meaning of light and how this is shaped by different forms, styles and contexts.

  • The ways light is mediated in architecture, physically, such as with glazing and mirrors.

  • The ways in which light is expressed in architectural drawings and other forms of representation.

  • The relationship between natural and artificial light in/on architecture.

  • The impact of developing glazing and lighting technologies upon architecture.

  • The relationship between light and shadow in/on architecture.

  • The politics of light, particularly in an urban setting.

  • The methodological problems of analyzing light – by nature immaterial – in architectural history.

  • What scientific studies of light can bring to our understanding of its effects in architecture.

    If you are interested in contributing to the symposium, please submit an abstract of maximum 300 words and a biography of maximum 150 words to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 10am on Monday 7 January 2019.

    The SAHGB is not able to reimburse speakers for their travel/accommodation expenses but the symposium registration fee will be waived and speakers will be invited to attend the symposium dinner on Friday 21 June 2019.

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Sat 22 June 2019

FRASCARI SYMPOSIUM IV: Call for papers

The Secret Lives of Architectural Drawings and Models: From Translating to Archiving, Collecting, and Displaying

Kingston University London

June 2019

Architectural drawings and models are instruments of imagination, communication and historical continuity. The role of drawings and models, their ownership, placement and authorship in a ubiquitous digital age deserve careful consideration. Despite them being the first handiwork of the architect, not enough attention is given to discussions about the sites of drawing activity, or to the matter of housing them, which is essential to the active relations between drawing and buildings, building and drawings, before, during and after construction.

Expanding on the well-established discussion of the translation from drawings to buildings, the Frascari Symposium IV questions the significance of the lives of drawings and models- before, during and after construction. Where drawings and models dwell in relation to buildings, impacts their seminality and their potential future translations, from drawing to building, building to drawing. In this process of multi-directional and multi-temporal constructions, who has ownership of the drawings and models, and where do they belong?

Robin Evans outlined the translational gap between drawings and buildings. The Latin word translationem during the Renaissance period indicated literally a physical transporting, including that of building elements. The translations of architectural elements were a documented and planned act that resulted from meaningful changes and led to changes in meaning.

The relevance of the physical presence and location of drawings and models within the buildings that they represent, their physical transporting from one place to another, from the places where they have been made to where they are kept during construction, or to designated locations in the thereafter of the fabrication process deserves scholarly critical analysis.

Nowadays, architectural drawings often reside in private, or public archives, and in museum collections housing the body of work of individual architects. This is the case with many collections, including the works of the Modernist masters of architecture. Archives are progressively making their physical collections digitally accessible online facilitating research and potentially having a tangible impact on the future teaching of architecture.

Architectural drawings can sometimes be found in hidden compartments inside the newel post of staircases in buildings from the Victorian up to the Modern period. The attention to maintaining architectural drawings in buildings shifted to the pragmatic aspects of construction drawings. Nowadays a set of working drawings may be kept in mechanical rooms.

The on site presence of elected representations is emblematic of the process of on-site inventory in its dual nature of cultural recollection and fostering of future imaginings. The storytelling of the site, the site of building construction and the edifice exist in various relations to each other extending the lives of drawings in meaningful ways beyond the time of construction, which is often perceived as an end to the translational relations between them. The continuity and contiguity of drawings, models and building may define an extended site, which is open even after construction has ended.

The digital age is characterized by a ubiquitous site of drawing production. Even though it is now possible to reproduce digital drawings and models in multiple originals, facilitating the construction of a twinned theory and pondering its significance, digital drawings and models might not remain fully accessible long into the future due to the rapid obsolescence implied by software development. Archives are faced with the challenge of what and how much to preserve.

Architects and scholars are invited to consider these questions before they become an archival question and plan for the representations that inform the future of an extended site in becoming, if past and future are to engage in meaningful relations. A new criticality requires moving beyond the either/or option of the office, the laboratory, the factory, the construction site as separate fabrication and archival sites. The contemporary architect moves between them looking for a critical presence on the construction site, before, during and after construction.

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Sat 15 June 2019

Mobs and Microbes: Market Halls, Civic Order and Public Health

72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians: Call for Papers

Providence, Rhode Island, USA

April 24 2019 - April 29 2019

2019 marks fifty years since the central market of Paris was uprooted from Les Halles and transferred to Rungis in the city’s outskirts. By 1971, nearly all of Victor Baltard’s iconic pavilions were demolished. Les Halles, as well as many comparable covered market halls across Europe, North America, and beyond, became flashpoints of protest between urban reformers who argued for functionalism and architectural preservationists who championed the adaptation of historical structures. Despite their polarities, both sides presented the market buildings as artefacts of the Industrial Revolution. In particular, the portrayal of glass and iron markets as antiquated relics made it challenging to fathom how these places originally elicited awe and wonder at the time of their construction. Congestion, sanitation, and radical changes in the distribution of food supplies are typically cited as reasons for the demise of covered market buildings. Ironically, however, most of the halls were originally conceived to answer these very same factors. As such, this session will situate markets at the intersection of civic order and public health, focusing in particular on how these structures stood in reciprocity with changes in the conception of the public realm. Central to this discussion are two themes: innovations in design, which embodied authority or control; and advancements in sanitation and hygiene, such as the modernization of water systems and the inception of epidemiological and bacteriological research.

We invite proposals across a broad geographical area that investigate how covered market halls were radical interventions that mediated socio-political conflict and disorder. Papers exploring medical and environmental humanities perspectives are also welcome, and these might question how infrastructure, services, technologies, and materials helped facilitate improvements in urban health and food safety. Papers that consider how surviving covered markets contribute to debates surrounding sustainability and neighborhood regeneration are also of interest.

The 72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians will take place on April 24-28, 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island. Applicants must submit a 300-word abstract and CV through the online portal of the Society of Architectural Historians ( http://www.sah.org/2019 ). Further details of the submission guidelines are available at www.sah.org. Please do not send materials directly to the panel co-chairs. Submission of proposals to the SAH online portal closes at 11:59 on June 5, 2018 (Central Daylight Time).

Session Chairs: Samantha Martin-McAuliffe, University College Dublin, and Leila Marie Farah, Ryerson University

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Wed 24 April 2019

On Monumentality

Call for Papers (Deadline 15/06/2018)

Acropolis Museum, Athens

April 04 2019 - April 06 2019

A century separates us from the “rupture of history” and the historical ambiguities that the early heroic modernism introduced in the urban space, and eighty years from the destruction of the European monumental deposit from the bombings of WWII, a defining moment for the introduction of new kinds of monumentality alongside the old ones. Yet, monumentality still emerges as a major spatial, aesthetic, symbolic, architectural and archaeological phenomenon. In a climate of pessimism in present day western cities, which are dealing with an increasingly precarious present, due to  economic and other forms of instability, the durability of monumentality as “urban permanence” (the famous Aldo Rossi concept), appears to be among the few remaining symbolic and spatial rocks and as such is needed, maintained, enhanced, landscaped and even invented.

The international conference “On Monumentality”, organised by the Module Art-Architecture-Urban Planning, Hellenic Open University, to be held in the Acropolis Museum, Athens, 4-6 of April, 2019, will explore the following relevant dimensions of monumentality and the monumental both in the European urban and peripheral space and also of cities/countries globally: 

  • Old, new and emergent kinds of monumentality
  • Struggles around monumentality formation: Social, symbolic and political aspects
  • Aesthetics of monumentality’s protection
  • The economic and developmental aspects of monumentality
  • Monumentality in the urban space and the “natural”/regional landscape
  • Scales of the monumental

In the above context is invited the submission of proposals for papers from architects, archaeologists, architectural historians, urban planners, urban and cultural geographers, art theorists and historians, social anthropologists and other relevant theorists before June 15, 2018. Acceptance of papers will be decided by late July 2018.  Participation will be free of charge. Languages translated: English, Greek.

Proposals, including name plus title and abstract of paper of up to 300 words, can be sent to one or all of the following members of the organizing committee:

Prof. Argyro Loukaki:                              .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Assoc. Prof. Dimitris Plantzos:              .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Jenny Albani:                                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Dionysis Mourelatos:                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Konstantinos Soueref                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Stavros Alifragkis                               .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

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Thu 4 April 2019

Call for Papers – AIARG 8: Field Conditions

Dublin School of Architecture, Dublin

January 24 2019 - January 25 2019

The eighth annual conference of the All Ireland Architecture Research Group (AIARG 8) seeks to explore field conditions within the profession and the discipline of architecture. It is a useful term in architectural discourse for a number of reasons: it is descriptive of the manner in which buildings can gather the ‘as found’ elements of a site around them; it captures something of the nature of non-hierarchical space; it recognises the way in which architecture draws connections between multiple and distinct bodies of knowledge; and it posits boundaries not as rigid delineating barriers, but instead as rich transitional zones.

We imagine that papers could address various questions, including, but not limited to:

-        Where are the rich transitional zones between disciplines?

-        In what ways does the architectural design process respond to multiple physical, cultural and social conditions?

-        How have field-based compositional principles impacted on the history of architecture?

-        How does architecture both draw upon and influence other disciplines?

-        How do boundary conditions manifest themselves in urbanism, building and technology?

 

We welcome abstracts on the theme of field conditions from practitioners, theoreticians and teachers*. We are particularly interested in proposals that explore the critical zones between fields. We welcome proposals for alternative media that may step outside an academic milieu: roundtable discussions, performances, exhibitions, posters, etc. Abstracts (limited to one per individual) of not more that 350 words should be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) no later than 3 September 2018. A selection of papers from the conference will be invited to submit to building material, the peer-reviewed journal of the Architectural Association of Ireland.

 

* In the following fields: Architectural Design, Architectural History, Architectural Representation and Rendering, Architectural Research, Architectural Technology, Building Code Analysis, Building Construction, Building Systems, Civil Engineering, Client Relations, Collaborative Design, Conservation, Construction Administration, Construction Document Management, Construction Finance Management, Construction Law, Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, Design, Design Build, Design to Delivery, Façade Engineering, Facilities Management, Housing Design, Industrial Design, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED), Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Model Making, Participative Design, Planning, Preservation, Procurement, Problem Solving, Project Management, Public Realm Design, Quantity Surveying, Rehabilitation, Renovation, Reuse, Revit Consultancy, Structural Engineering, Sustainable Design, Specification, Technical Design, Urban Design, Universal Design, etc.

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Thu 24 January 2019

Smartness? between discourse and practice

15th Architectural Humanities Research Association International Conference

Department of the Built Environment, TU Eindhoven

November 15 2018 - November 17 2018

Increasingly the world around us is becoming ‘smart.’ From smart meters to smart production, from smart surfaces to smart grids, from smart phones to smart citizens. ‘Smart’ has become the catch-all term to indicate the advent of a charged technological shift that has been propelled by the promise of safer, more convenient and more efficient forms of living. When combined, all these so called ‘smart’ devices amount to a ubiquity of computing which is heralding a new technological paradigm and a fundamental shift in the way buildings and cities are both experienced and understood. Through a variety of sensors, cities and buildings are now defined not by the people that inhabit them, nor their functions, nor their identity or history, but simply as increasingly larger sets of data. Such sets are then processed to immediately adjust and alter (physical) conditions in real time. Although such large scale collection and use of (big) data has an inevitable effect on the way people live and work, there has yet to emerge a clear answer to how architecture and cities should respond and assimilate such brave new world.

Call for Papers (see website for further details and guidance: https://www.smartness-discoursepractice.org/call-for-papers/)

 

MAY 01, 2018

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Thu 15 November 2018

A World of Architectural History

Bartlett School of Architecture, Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London, UK

November 02 2018 - November 04 2018

The conference’s aim is to critique and celebrate the latest advances within architectural history globally over the last few decades, by focusing upon the word ‘global’ in two senses: 

  • Geographically, referring to the increasing inclusion of all parts of the world in more complex and multiple discourses of architectural history;
  • Intellectually, the ongoing expansion of architectural history into other academic subjects, plus the reception of ideas/themes from those subjects.

The conference will take place around the same time as the publication of Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture (Bloomsbury Press), although as a separate event. Recognition will be given to a more inclusive approach to architectural history that seeks to incorporate the histories of all countries/regions, and to the significant contributions now being made through interdisciplinary links with other subjects. As such, the conference will represent the forefront of the field internationally and also discuss where architectural history ought to head in future. Conference presenters will include those from the wide range of subject areas within the Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment and leading figures in architectural history across the world. Papers will consist of a balance of those by invited speakers and those selected via an open call.

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Fri 2 November 2018

The City (Re)Shaped

University of Leeds

September 11 2018 - September 12 2018

The Architecture & Urbanism Research Cluster, sponsored by the Cities Theme and the School of Civil Engineering, invites you to The City (Re)Shaped.

This multi-disciplinary conference aims to further our understanding of the intertwined dynamic nature of the Politics of Urbanism and the Urbanism of Politics as manifested in many cities around the world. Conversely, it questions how cities and everyday urban life are used – and abused – in the containment of these wider national conflicts, and it explores their potential for achieving the self-sustaining moderation, constructive channelling or resolution.

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Tue 11 September 2018

Urbanism @ BORDERS

Interdisciplinary Global Workshop for Research Network (Call for Papers or Documentary Films)

Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

September 05 2018 - September 08 2018

  1. Border research emphases on the discourse analysis on critical issues and connotation of separation - demarcation – segregation and conflicts and translated and theorizing these issues in various patterns of urbanism. Borders determine the degree of how regions are positioned in the global maps with the condition with which regions are valued, categorised and marked by its capacity to create individual geographical identities and unique settlement patterns. Borders define socially and economically incompatible systems that influence the nature of mobility of goods, human traffic, and economic transactions that suggest temporal, subdued, blurring socio-cultural entities defined by urban orders. Borders create these blurring urban orders along its boundaries defined by lack of cohesiveness with either sides of a border.

Borders are more than geographically defined separations, but accounts of metamorphoses and metaphors that two neighbouring states are defined by the economy, politics, culture, and religion – manifested by its typological entities.

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Wed 5 September 2018

New Publications

Architecture and Feminisms Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

Edited by Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting

Set against the background of a ‘general crisis’ that is environmental, political and social, this book examines a series of specific intersections between architecture and feminisms, understood in the plural. The collected essays and projects that make up the book follow transversal trajectories that criss-cross between ecologies, economies and technologies, exploring specific cases and positions in relation to the themes of the archive, control, work and milieu. This collective intellectual labour can be located amidst a worldwide depletion of material resources, a hollowing out of political power and the degradation of constructed and natural environments. Feminist positions suggest ways of ethically coping with a world that is becoming increasingly unstable and contested. The many voices gathered here are united by the task of putting critical concepts and feminist design tools to use in order to offer experimental approaches to the creation of a more habitable world. Drawing inspiration from the active archives of feminist precursors, existing and re-imagined, and by way of a re-engagement in the histories, theories and projected futures of critical feminist projects, the book presents a collection of twenty-three essays and eight projects, with the aim of taking stock of our current condition and re-engaging in our precarious environment-worlds.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Becoming a Feminist Architect

Karin Reisinger and Meike Schalk

This issue is one of three publications subsequent to the 13th International Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) Conference “Architecture & Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies,” which was held at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm, between the 17th to 19th November in 2016.1 The conference gathered around 200 participants and included over a hundred paper presentations and performances, as well as two exhibitions. The overwhelming interest in reviving the feminist discourse in architecture gave us the opportunity to reflect on the process of becoming feminist architects. Becoming a feminist architectis a complex process, rife with strategies, tactics, frictions, advances and retreats, that will continue to engage us in the future as it does now. This became clear through the presentations of a wide range of different feminist architectural practices, both historical and contemporary, their diverse theoretical underpinnings and methodological reflections and speculations. The present publication assembles a series of vital discussions that emerged at the event, including accounts of careful and creative ways of becoming feminist architects by “knowing and doing otherwise,”2 “practising ‘otherwise’,”3 or doing architecture in other ways,4the implication of which is a rethinking and expansion of the conventional scope of architectural practice. With these three publications – this edition of Field Journal, the Architecture and Culture issue “Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects,” and the anthology Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies – we have made an effort to create space for as many of the voices and positions present at the conference as possible.

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Mon 8 January 2018

New Courses

Lecturer in Architectural Studies, University of Manchester

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Wed 20 June 2018

Two post-docs and two PhD positions available at the Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Fri 10 August 2018