AHRA Newsletter:
February-March 2019

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The next newsletter will be issued in April 2019

New Events

Architecture & Collective Life

Call for Papers: 16th Annual AHRA International Conference

University of Dundee

November 21 2019 - November 23 2019

What does society look like?

If you want to know what society looks like, look at our cities: look at their distribution of spaces and artefacts; look at their scales, intensities, and densities. Look at how they curate events. Architecture & Collective Life will explore the relations that bind people and environments into settlements, and settlements into civilisations. In The Politics Aristotle argued that the city has a particular form because public life has a particular form. Vitruvius’ account of the primitive hut is as much about the emergence of society as it is about the emergence of architecture. Today, new media and digital technologies are creating new forms of association, which are shifting the locus of political life; and it is now no longer possible for Hannah Arendt, reading Aristotle, to so neatly equate the city with politics. This discourse is urgent. The post-war public realm is under pressure from market-led ideologies and development practices. The damage we are doing to the environment, and the way identity politics has shifted the tenor of public debate, raise questions from seemingly opposite corners about our capacities to organise for thoughtful collective action.

We are interested in how the individual and the collective are constructed and reproduced in public and private life, at different scales, in different disciplines, with the intention of keeping these categories as open as possible to different areas of thought and action. We would like to know how collectives are constructed around labour, power, authority, authorship, events, times, places, non-places, otherness, ecology, technology, media, the zeitgeist, ideologies, consciousness, origins, histories, beauty, housing, and campfires. As a vehicle of the AHRA, we are particularly keen to explore the contributions of architecture to this process. We also are interested in the roles of research, the humanities, and the University – the institution with a social mandate for intellectual culture and education – in building forms of collective intelligence and collective life.

Architecture & Collective Life will constitute an inclusive and critical discourse with a broad interdisciplinary base in the liberal arts and sciences, with a programme of debates and round table discussions and exhibitions, public lectures, film screenings, and paper sessions. We invite theorists, practitioners, and community activists within and outwith academe, in charities, public agencies and institutions, to present proposals for individual papers and paper sessions. We intend to use this conference as a forum for thinking out loud and in public, with the openness, commitment, and criticality that we expect to find in the University.

The AHRA is now accepting abstracts for its 16thannual conference in Dundee on 21-23 November 2019. We encourage submissions from architects, urbanists, planners, community activists, and policymakers, alongside scholars and practitioners from related fields including: philosophy, history, law, politics, economics, psychology, geography, sociology, and medicine. We welcome independent scholars, interested individuals and students. Over the course of the three day conference there will be five keynote lectures, 30 paper sessions and a number of round table discussions. We are accepting abstracts for individual papers, paper sessions, and round table discussions. Please mark clearly the format of your proposal.

More information here: https://ahra2019.com/call-for-papers/

Deadline: Please submit proposals no later than 5pm on 1 February 2019.

Contact Lorens Holm and Penny Lewis at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Keynote speakers, confirmed:

Jodi Dean, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Reinier De Graaf, OMA and Cambridge University
Indris Kagis McEwan, Concordia University, Montreal
Joan Ockman, University of Pennsylvania School of Design
Martino Tattara, Dogma and Catholic University Leuven

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Thu 21 November 2019

Les intérieurs aujourd’hui/ Interiors today

Méthodes de production et d’analyse interdisciplinaires/Interdisciplinarymethods of productionand analysis

ENSA-Versailles

October 11 2019 - October 12 2019

Interior spaces have often lent themselves to the experimentations of different professionals (architects, interior designers, decorators, ensembliers, designers, artists, etc). By themselves or in collaboration and in frequent interaction with the client, these creators work at the frontiers of several disciplines: architecture, visual arts, design, decoration, etc. These practices testify certain kinds of permeability that take the form of dialogues, transfers, and contaminations, and that aim to produce effects in terms of spaces, uses, perceptions, and emotions. 

Adopting synergetic, critical, contemporary and experimental perspectives, we will question the notion of interior, specifically its versatility, its ambiguity, and its wealth, with regard to its modalities of production, appropriation and perception: from the scale of the body to that of the metropolis (from the object to the space, from domestic spaces to shared spaces of activity, consumption, or entertainment), measured in terms of ecological challenges (the production environments), modern and contemporary practices and uses (lifestyle, services, transportation, mobility) or with regard to new kinds of spatiality (new spaces of sociability, tools and practices of digital spaces). By going beyond the divisions, categorizations, and traditional oppositions (between the outside and the inside, the private and the public, the individual and the collective, etc.), we will reflect and redefine the interior in its relation to environments, territories, and uses, to perceive its historical and synchronical relevance and to grasp its conceptual operationality for the process of the project. What makes an interior? How is it conceived? How is it read, interpreted? How is it lived and felt?

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Fri 11 October 2019

Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain, CfP October 22, 2018, Conference October 10-11, 2019

Masters and Disciples; Women at the Bauhaus; The Other Avant-gardes, the Time of the Bauhaus; New Ways of Living, from the Dwelling to the City; Questions of Pedagogy; Mediation over Technology, Crafts versus Industrialization; Encounters between Art and Architecture; Bauhaus Networks; Historiography, Critique and Controversies

Madrid. ILE, Institución Libre de Enseñanza

October 10 2019 - October 11 2019

The Association of historians of Architecture and Urban Design (AhAU) invites researchers and scholars to present their contributions to the Conference Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain. The conference will have an interdisciplinary character, and it will be opened to those questions and areas of knowledge related to the addressed theme.

The paper proposals will be exclusively individual and their extension will have a minimum of 700 and a maximum of 1000 words. They will need to indicate the selected question, and they will be accompanied by two representative images, a selected bibliography, and a brief CV of the author (maximum extension of two pages).

Rather than a numerous collection of contributions, the aim of the Conference is again to awake a series of engaged debates on the different questions that articulate the proposed theme.

October 22, 2018 DEADLINE TO SUBMIT A PAPER ABSTRACT

October 10-11, 2019 Celebration of the II International Conference AhAU, Madrid

Communication with the general chairs and the submission of proposals and final papers will be made through the following address: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Keynote Speakers: Magdalena Droste, Juan José Lahuerta

General Chairs: Laura Martínez de Guereñu, Carolina B. García Estévez

 

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Thu 10 October 2019

Homes fit for Heroes Centenary Conference

Learning from 1919

Institute of Historical Research, London

July 19 2019 - July 19 2019

This conference is convened by the Learning from 1919 Steering Group in partnership withthe Institute of Historical Research to commemorate the centenary of the passage of the 1919 Housing Act and the Homes fit for Heroes programme that it inaugurated. It will explore new historical perspectives on the Act and the housing that was built under its provisions (and those of subsequent Acts in 1923 and 1924), which established the principle of state-subsidised social housing for the next 60 years, as well as wider themes in social/council housing policy and design across the centenary period, and look towards the future of housing in the next century.

We now announce the Call for Papers for the conference, which will take place on 18th-19th July 2019 at the Institute of Historical Research, Malet Street, London. Closing date: 5th January 2019.

The Learning from 1919 Steering Group comprises Dr Elizabeth Darling (Oxford Brookes University), Dr Michael Passmore (University of Greenwich), Professor Mark Swenarton (University of Liverpool), Dr Matthew Whitfield (Historic England) and Matthew Bristow (Institute of Historical Research).

General enquiries and the Word files of proposals should be emailed to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 

Further information: http://www.history.ac.uk/events/event/16727 

 

 

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Fri 19 July 2019

Homes fit for Heroes Centenary Conference: Learning from 1919

Call for Papers

Institute of Historical Research, University of London

July 18 2019 - July 19 2019

The Learning from 1919 Steering Group in partnership with the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, are pleased to announce that a conference will take place in July 2019 to commemorate the centenary of the passage of the 1919 Housing Act and the Homes fit for Heroes programme that it inaugurated.
The conference will take place on Thursday 18 July and Friday 19 July 2019 with a series of related events nationwide scheduled over the following weekend of 20 and 21 July 2019. The aim is to bring together multi-disciplinary perspectives from researchers that will:

  • showcase new historical perspectives on the 1919 Act and the housing that was built under its provisions (and those of subsequent Acts in 1923 and 1924), and which established the principle of local authorities building social housing that was followed for the next 60 years;
  • consider wider themes in social housing policy and design across the centenary period;
  • and look towards the future of housing in the next century.

The Learning from 1919 Steering Group now announces the Call for Papers for the conference. Paper proposals should be should be emailed to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Deadline: 5th January 2019 for notification no later than March 2019. Successful applicants will be expected to cover their own costs for travel and accommodation.

 

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Thu 18 July 2019

Distance Looks Back

A Thematic Conference of the European Architectural History Network, held in conjunction with the 36th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand

University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning

July 10 2019 - July 13 2019

Distance is both conceptual and actual. It is overcome or exploited in all manner of ways that have consequences for the history of architecture. It is fostered in the critical attitude. And collapsed when history is invoked in the present. It shapes the relationship of Europe to its Antipodes, as well as of Europe to its neighbours. Its presence is necessary for claims upon disciplinarity; its absence, the dissolution of disciplinary boundaries. In what ways has distance figured in the history of architecture? What has it altered? What has it prevented? What has it allowed? What does it permit, even now?

This theme opens the door to questions of representation and communication in the history of architecture; questions of travel and migration; and of the mobility of expertise, institutions and ideas. As a lens, distance allows us to reflect on the construction of identity in and through architectural works both defined as such (Architects and Architecture) and “grey”. It invites us to consider moments of counterpoint, imaging or critique. It provokes us to clarify, recalibrate, expose, suppress, or legitimise. Works, projects, architects and other agents in the conceptualisation and construction of architecture, cities and landscapes are, from a remove, perceived on terms different from the immediate and the close. Artefacts and ideas subjected to distance acquire something of this perspective, whether they are physically moved or subject to representation at a remove. Distance can be inconvenient; and useful.

We welcome original papers that explore the import of distance for architectural history from any direction. Proposals may treat any time and geography. They might address the consequences of literal distance for architectural culture in its history: communication, travel, mobility, isolation, exile, or technical and intellectual networks. They might consider the figurative role of distance in forms of criticality, historicity and thought. Papers may reflect on the mechanisms and nature of architectural history through such concepts as immediacy, instrumentality or relevance; or of neutralization or obsolescence. Contributions might use an idea of distance to think through distinctions (in disciplines, practices or institutions) between architectural history and criticism, architectural history and archaeology, architectural history and area studies, architectural history, urban history, histories of science and technology, the history of art, etc. Or to use these distinctions to reflect on architecture and its neighbouring professions and practices. Papers may reflect on the devices used by architectural historiography to manage distance: historiographical and critical nomenclature; theoretical terms and tropes; and other means of negotiating proximity. Consideration may even be given to the very historiographical valence of distance – as, for instance, productive criticality or problematic estrangement.

One strand of this conference theme responds to the special issue of Architectural Histories (2018) asking “What is Europe?”. The theme invokes, too, the ideas at the centre of the lecture series convened by New Zealand historian Keith Sinclair in 1960: Distance Looks Our Way; and in Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey’s Tyranny of Distance (1966). What are the effects of remoteness on an antipodean response to architecture’s historical metropole? Or of the significance of the globe beyond its “centres”? What occurs when isolation is made operative? The idea of distance, in this sense, invites self-reflection as much as advancement of new knowledge. We therefore particularly welcome papers that reflect on distance in order to reflect on the concept of Europe and the European and its consequences for architecture beyond a strictly defined European geography. We welcome, too, papers that consider the architectural history and culture of Asia, Australasia and the Pacific in their global contexts. The program will have sessions dedicated to these themes.

The convenors will be pleased to receive information concerning events or exhibitions scheduled or planned for the dates around this conference, including conferences in major hub cities or other cities in Australia or New Zealand that might interest delegates travelling from afar. The conference website will include a calendar of these events.

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Wed 10 July 2019

The MIssing Map: Mapping Social Impacts

University of Reading

June 25 2019 - June 25 2019

Beginning with a keynote talk by Professor Doina Petrescu (Atelier d’Architecture Autogérée and University of Sheffield), this Newton funded symposium will explore methodologies for the spatial mapping of social value, for example connection, community, memory, identity and empowerment. Contributions are invited from researchers both practitioner and academic with an interest in making social impact more visible and therefore more valuable.

Maps are often thought to be benign and neutral representations of the world. But as James Corner observes through the ʻselection, omission, isolation, distance and codificationʼ of maps, they have the capacity to be, ʻstrategic, constitutive and inventiveʼ. Moves towards open and freely available mapping, such as Open Street Map and Google Earth, alongside advances in technology, mean that more and more people carry maps in their pocket as they go about their daily activities in the city. Previously, high resolution satellite imagery and geolocating technology would have been the preserve of the military, however, today it is ubiquitous. With the rise of smart phones and sensors people can easily gather, produce and navigate city data. This raises questions, not only with regard to what mapping can reveal about the city, but also about what remains hidden.

In order to explore sociocultural concerns in context, mapping may provide visual and/or participatory ways of exploring alternate perspectives. By taking into consideration the stories behind these maps, previously unrecorded narratives can richly complement our understandings of where and how we live.

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Tue 25 June 2019

Fielding Architecture: Feminist Practices for a Decolonised Pedagogy

Call for Papers

University of Brighton (UK)

June 24 2019 - June 25 2019

In the late 1970s architectural and spatial practices in the UK were challenged
by feminist approaches largely derived from within the architectural discipline itself. From the 1990s onwards, architectural history / theory has been informed by gender theory appropriated, or migrated, from other disciplines. More recently, interdisciplinary critical methodologies have been used to reconceptualise archi- tectural production, criticism and representation. What we evidence today, de- spite an emphasis on ‘Global Architecture,’ is that all these efforts are still largely informed unilaterally, and constructed within ‘Western’ and ‘Anglo-Saxon’ frame- works. This leaves a field defined as the ‘West’ and the ‘rest’. Further, the majority of rethinking of gender and decolonisation occurs within institutional and aca- demic frameworks through practices of teaching and writing. This activity, though pertinent, often remains interior and self-referential and fails to permeate to and affect the exterior worlds of professional architectural and design practices.

This interdisciplinary symposium proposes to explore and question the practice of teaching architectural history / theory primarily focused in the UK context though welcoming a debate through dialogues with other contexts from a femi- nist and critical perspective, asking: how is it constructed, from which positions, and from where its content derives; how can its construction be critiqued and informed by other disciplines such as feminist geographies, environmental psy- chology, cultural studies, technology and science studies, queer theory and urban geography amongst others; and, moreover, how should architectural histories and theories be constructed in the future. We will situate ourselves at the boundary: looking both inside at the fundamentals of architecture; and looking outside at the expanded field, yet always maintaining a critical gendered perspective.

Taking place at the University of Brighton (UK), on June 24–25th, 2019, the sym- posium asks: What forms might a gendered history and theory of architecture take? What are our modes of operation, how do we teach, and how can we learn from others and exchange with critical thinkers both inside and outside the academy? How do we operate within the established frameworks, both histori- cal and institutional, and how can we establish new frameworks and networks that transfer/exchange knowledge between the university and different modes of practice?

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Mon 24 June 2019

Architecture and Light – 2019 SAHGB symposium – CALL FOR PAPERS

St George’s Bloomsbury, and the Soane Museum, London

June 22 2019 - June 22 2019

From the glittering windows of Hardwick Hall and the severe shadows of the Trellick Tower, to the poetry of Chandigarh and the brash neon of Las Vegas, light is a defining factor in any form of architectural design.

This symposium will coincide with two exhibitions at Sir John Soane’s Museum: one on ‘Soane and Light’ and another – as yet untitled – with a leading contemporary light artist working in sympathy with the spaces of the Museum. As such the theme of this symposium is ‘architecture and light’ and thereby focuses on the presence, use and meaning of light in architectural design across all periods and styles.

One important starting point will be the notion that, just as light is understood scientifically as a wave- particle duality, in architecture light exists and functions as both a natural and cultural phenomenon. While on the one hand, the way (sun)light falls over a building is arguably architecture at its most elemental, how we view those light effects is always culturally conditioned. The symposium will reflect, develop and challenge this dualism.

We welcome speakers – both established and emerging – considering this subject in all aspects of architectural production. Some of the topics that papers might consider are:

  • Light as a functional element in architecture and its interactions with different materials and construction methodologies.

  • The meaning of light and how this is shaped by different forms, styles and contexts.

  • The ways light is mediated in architecture, physically, such as with glazing and mirrors.

  • The ways in which light is expressed in architectural drawings and other forms of representation.

  • The relationship between natural and artificial light in/on architecture.

  • The impact of developing glazing and lighting technologies upon architecture.

  • The relationship between light and shadow in/on architecture.

  • The politics of light, particularly in an urban setting.

  • The methodological problems of analyzing light – by nature immaterial – in architectural history.

  • What scientific studies of light can bring to our understanding of its effects in architecture.

    If you are interested in contributing to the symposium, please submit an abstract of maximum 300 words and a biography of maximum 150 words to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 10am on Monday 7 January 2019.

    The SAHGB is not able to reimburse speakers for their travel/accommodation expenses but the symposium registration fee will be waived and speakers will be invited to attend the symposium dinner on Friday 21 June 2019.

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Sat 22 June 2019

Control. Code. Construct

Call for Papers

University of Edinburgh, UK

June 20 2019 - June 22 2019

Big Data. Machine Learning. Robotics. Artificial Intelligence. Algorithms. Data. Industry 4.0. Digitalisation. Democratisation. Surveillance. Smartness. Interaction.
Criticality. Challenge. Provocation. Paradigm. Dogma. Avantgarde.
Control. Code. Construct. addresses the implications of these different aspects of tech culture for the applied world of architecture, construction and design. Control. Code. Construct. will serve as a platform to initiate a discussion and debate with the notion of control at its centre. We wish to explore the different dimensions of control for designers, architects and engineers — from controlling material, form and code to controlling processes and start-ups. 
Control. Code. Construct. explores the relationship between the adequacy of code, computation and the machine —computer, robot, drone etc.— and tacit knowledge, the type of knowledge that craftsmen or makers hold, accumulated through years of experience and which is hard to transfer into verbal communication, let alone code. Where does the boundary lie between implicit and explicit knowledge, in terms of architecture, construction and design? This question can be also transferred to other domains such as big data, artificial intelligence and smartness — where does computational decision making stop and where does human, soft decision making begin?
Control. Code. Construct. addresses these complexities of making by describing, advancing and ultimately interrogating technical realities in relation to formulated strategies related to material, geometry, structure, data, evaluation, simulation and the used machines.
Computation and construction are closely related to the notion of the designer’s control over process. We wish to investigate the various forms and shapes control can take in the disciplines of architecture, design and engineering. Going beyond theoretical discourses, we intend to explore the realities of making and construction of the creative industries.
The relationship between knowledge and technical realities is best expressed by Frei Otto — “to build means to make architecture real on the borders of knowledge.” What are today’s borders of knowledge and what could the new operational models of architecture, design and engineering look like? In which direction is the design Avantgarde moving and how could the new interdisciplinary design agendas look like? What does control and control of process really mean and how is it formulated when it comes to digital techniques and methodologies? What logics will code and control follow to also facilitate material logics? How do we measure and asses performance within these emerging digital ecologies of making, designing and constructing? 
We invite architects, engineers, designers, practitioners, researchers and students to contribute to these discussions, to go beyond theory and to address these questions related to the technical rationalities and realities of the creative industries, to challenge the status quo and to explore different methodologies, agendas, techniques and strategies in relation to code, control and the constructing of process.
The conference focuses on the following 6 areas of interest:
Area I: Interaction DesignArea
II: Additive ManufacturingArea
III: Robotic Fabrication & Machine-Learning AlgorithmsArea
IV: Drone Supported PracticesArea
V: Hacking InfrastructuresArea
VI: Entrepreneurship

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Thu 20 June 2019

FRASCARI SYMPOSIUM IV: Call for papers

The Secret Lives of Architectural Drawings and Models: From Translating to Archiving, Collecting, and Displaying

Kingston University London

June 2019

Architectural drawings and models are instruments of imagination, communication and historical continuity. The role of drawings and models, their ownership, placement and authorship in a ubiquitous digital age deserve careful consideration. Despite them being the first handiwork of the architect, not enough attention is given to discussions about the sites of drawing activity, or to the matter of housing them, which is essential to the active relations between drawing and buildings, building and drawings, before, during and after construction.

Expanding on the well-established discussion of the translation from drawings to buildings, the Frascari Symposium IV questions the significance of the lives of drawings and models- before, during and after construction. Where drawings and models dwell in relation to buildings, impacts their seminality and their potential future translations, from drawing to building, building to drawing. In this process of multi-directional and multi-temporal constructions, who has ownership of the drawings and models, and where do they belong?

Robin Evans outlined the translational gap between drawings and buildings. The Latin word translationem during the Renaissance period indicated literally a physical transporting, including that of building elements. The translations of architectural elements were a documented and planned act that resulted from meaningful changes and led to changes in meaning.

The relevance of the physical presence and location of drawings and models within the buildings that they represent, their physical transporting from one place to another, from the places where they have been made to where they are kept during construction, or to designated locations in the thereafter of the fabrication process deserves scholarly critical analysis.

Nowadays, architectural drawings often reside in private, or public archives, and in museum collections housing the body of work of individual architects. This is the case with many collections, including the works of the Modernist masters of architecture. Archives are progressively making their physical collections digitally accessible online facilitating research and potentially having a tangible impact on the future teaching of architecture.

Architectural drawings can sometimes be found in hidden compartments inside the newel post of staircases in buildings from the Victorian up to the Modern period. The attention to maintaining architectural drawings in buildings shifted to the pragmatic aspects of construction drawings. Nowadays a set of working drawings may be kept in mechanical rooms.

The on site presence of elected representations is emblematic of the process of on-site inventory in its dual nature of cultural recollection and fostering of future imaginings. The storytelling of the site, the site of building construction and the edifice exist in various relations to each other extending the lives of drawings in meaningful ways beyond the time of construction, which is often perceived as an end to the translational relations between them. The continuity and contiguity of drawings, models and building may define an extended site, which is open even after construction has ended.

The digital age is characterized by a ubiquitous site of drawing production. Even though it is now possible to reproduce digital drawings and models in multiple originals, facilitating the construction of a twinned theory and pondering its significance, digital drawings and models might not remain fully accessible long into the future due to the rapid obsolescence implied by software development. Archives are faced with the challenge of what and how much to preserve.

Architects and scholars are invited to consider these questions before they become an archival question and plan for the representations that inform the future of an extended site in becoming, if past and future are to engage in meaningful relations. A new criticality requires moving beyond the either/or option of the office, the laboratory, the factory, the construction site as separate fabrication and archival sites. The contemporary architect moves between them looking for a critical presence on the construction site, before, during and after construction.

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Sat 15 June 2019

Building-Object/Design-Architecture: Exploring Interconnections

A conference jointly supported by the Design History Society, the European Architectural History Network, and the Architecture Space and Society Centre (Birkbeck)

Clore Business School (Birkbeck), London

June 06 2019 - June 08 2019

“I think that cars today are almost the exact equivalent of the great Gothic cathedrals: I mean the supreme creation of an era, conceived with passion by unknown artists, and consumed in image if not in usage by a whole population which appropriates them as a purely magical object.” Roland Barthes, 1957

This two-day conference will explore old, new and future interconnections between Design History and Architectural History. It will address the disciplines’ shared historiography, theory, forms of analysis and objects of critical enquiry, and draw attention to how recent developments in the one can have significant implications for the other. It will attend to areas of difference, in order, ultimately to identify new areas for discussion and set future agendas for research between the disciplines.

We invite proposals for individual papers (of 20 minutes length) in any area that productively engages with the aims of the conference and we would especially like to see papers in the following areas:

 

Historiographic entanglements and coincidences

Everyday environments

Ornament from object to building (and back)

Use/maintenance/dereliction

Objects on exhibition/buildings on exhibition

Micro to macro - macro to micro

Representations/representing

Tactility-virtuality

Interiors/Exteriors

 

 

Deadline for Abstracts – 15 November 2018

Abstracts (maximum 500 words). Papers will not be accepted that have already been accepted for another conference, or that have been published or accepted for publication.

 

Abstracts, with a two page CV, should be sent to –  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Thu 6 June 2019

11th Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Symposium

"Continuity in/of Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality"

Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

May 16 2019 - May 19 2019

The Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Forum (ACSF) announces its 2019 Symposium (ACSF 11) to take place in Taliesin West (Scottsdale, Arizona), an internationally recognized icon and destination for most architects, landscape architects, and designers.  Illuminated by the visionary and mystical figure of Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin West offers participants the perfect context where to meditate, sense, discuss, and even plan how to best harness the continuous interactions between nature, design, and spirituality. It also permits attendees to consider the little-addressed yet important legacy of FLW’s spiritual sensibility, belief, and practices vis-à-vis his work (60 years after his passing) in light of the huge challenges facing the world today. 

The symposium dates are May 16-19, 2019. As in previous symposia, ACSF 11 will be structured around a main topic (in this case "Continuity in/of Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality") but also open to ideas, works, and proposals relevant to the Forum's areas of interest.  We invite all individuals interested in participating in this event to submit proposals of 500 to 1,000 words for either the SYMPOSIUM TOPIC or an OPEN SESSION. Proposals may be submitted in one of three categories: paper, practice/research project, and workshop. The deadline is January 21st, 2019.

For more information, contact ACSF 11 co-chair Julio Bermudez at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 

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Thu 16 May 2019

13th International Design and Design History Symposium “Design and Authority”

Izmir, Turkey

May 02 2019 - May 04 2019

13th International Design and Design History Symposium

"Design and Authority"

Dates: May 2-4, 2019

Call for Papers: January 25, 2019

Location: Izmir, Turkey

email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

website: http://www.4t.org.tr/

 

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Thu 2 May 2019

Mobs and Microbes: Market Halls, Civic Order and Public Health

72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians: Call for Papers

Providence, Rhode Island, USA

April 24 2019 - April 29 2019

2019 marks fifty years since the central market of Paris was uprooted from Les Halles and transferred to Rungis in the city’s outskirts. By 1971, nearly all of Victor Baltard’s iconic pavilions were demolished. Les Halles, as well as many comparable covered market halls across Europe, North America, and beyond, became flashpoints of protest between urban reformers who argued for functionalism and architectural preservationists who championed the adaptation of historical structures. Despite their polarities, both sides presented the market buildings as artefacts of the Industrial Revolution. In particular, the portrayal of glass and iron markets as antiquated relics made it challenging to fathom how these places originally elicited awe and wonder at the time of their construction. Congestion, sanitation, and radical changes in the distribution of food supplies are typically cited as reasons for the demise of covered market buildings. Ironically, however, most of the halls were originally conceived to answer these very same factors. As such, this session will situate markets at the intersection of civic order and public health, focusing in particular on how these structures stood in reciprocity with changes in the conception of the public realm. Central to this discussion are two themes: innovations in design, which embodied authority or control; and advancements in sanitation and hygiene, such as the modernization of water systems and the inception of epidemiological and bacteriological research.

We invite proposals across a broad geographical area that investigate how covered market halls were radical interventions that mediated socio-political conflict and disorder. Papers exploring medical and environmental humanities perspectives are also welcome, and these might question how infrastructure, services, technologies, and materials helped facilitate improvements in urban health and food safety. Papers that consider how surviving covered markets contribute to debates surrounding sustainability and neighborhood regeneration are also of interest.

The 72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians will take place on April 24-28, 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island. Applicants must submit a 300-word abstract and CV through the online portal of the Society of Architectural Historians ( http://www.sah.org/2019 ). Further details of the submission guidelines are available at www.sah.org. Please do not send materials directly to the panel co-chairs. Submission of proposals to the SAH online portal closes at 11:59 on June 5, 2018 (Central Daylight Time).

Session Chairs: Samantha Martin-McAuliffe, University College Dublin, and Leila Marie Farah, Ryerson University

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Wed 24 April 2019

AHRA Annual PhD Student Symposium

The University of Manchester

April 24 2019 - April 25 2019

The AHRA Research Student Symposium 2019 takes as its starting point a broad and prolonged transition occurring in architectural research during the past decade. New and interdisciplinary approaches emerge as a result of our world’s socio-political and techno-ecological transformations towards relational, processual “architectural research.” These changes move away from descriptions and interpretations of a static formal “Architecture” focused on particular buildings and architects.

Following this interdisciplinary and processual turn, the 2019 AHRA PhD student symposium aims to bring together architectural researchers who work towards re-writing and re-drawing traditional notions of essence, fixity, boundedness, and flatness. We are interested in architectural research that:

  • follows people, buildings, infrastructures, non-humans, landscapes, and materials.
  • traces the ecological, the technical, the spatial, the temporal, the political, the economic, and the historical.
  • stimulates thinking and action across scales, forms, and collectives.

We invite contributions from a variety of fields with an aim to discuss and explore adequate ways of narrating and re-presenting the extended spectrum of architectural operations.

Submissions of proposals for academic papers and methods workshops are welcome from all backgrounds and nationalities. Applicants must be registered as current PhD students at the time of application. Please see details on the “Call for Papers” tab of the event website.

Deadline for submissions 28th January 2019.

The contact email is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) (Please note this is email account is administered by a number of people on the symposium organising committee, and replies might take a few days.)

Applications to participate in the Methods Workshops will be announced later. The event will be free to attend.

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Wed 24 April 2019

On Monumentality

Call for Papers (Deadline 15/06/2018)

Acropolis Museum, Athens

April 04 2019 - April 06 2019

A century separates us from the “rupture of history” and the historical ambiguities that the early heroic modernism introduced in the urban space, and eighty years from the destruction of the European monumental deposit from the bombings of WWII, a defining moment for the introduction of new kinds of monumentality alongside the old ones. Yet, monumentality still emerges as a major spatial, aesthetic, symbolic, architectural and archaeological phenomenon. In a climate of pessimism in present day western cities, which are dealing with an increasingly precarious present, due to  economic and other forms of instability, the durability of monumentality as “urban permanence” (the famous Aldo Rossi concept), appears to be among the few remaining symbolic and spatial rocks and as such is needed, maintained, enhanced, landscaped and even invented.

The international conference “On Monumentality”, organised by the Module Art-Architecture-Urban Planning, Hellenic Open University, to be held in the Acropolis Museum, Athens, 4-6 of April, 2019, will explore the following relevant dimensions of monumentality and the monumental both in the European urban and peripheral space and also of cities/countries globally: 

  • Old, new and emergent kinds of monumentality
  • Struggles around monumentality formation: Social, symbolic and political aspects
  • Aesthetics of monumentality’s protection
  • The economic and developmental aspects of monumentality
  • Monumentality in the urban space and the “natural”/regional landscape
  • Scales of the monumental

In the above context is invited the submission of proposals for papers from architects, archaeologists, architectural historians, urban planners, urban and cultural geographers, art theorists and historians, social anthropologists and other relevant theorists before June 15, 2018. Acceptance of papers will be decided by late July 2018.  Participation will be free of charge. Languages translated: English, Greek.

Proposals, including name plus title and abstract of paper of up to 300 words, can be sent to one or all of the following members of the organizing committee:

Prof. Argyro Loukaki:                              .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Assoc. Prof. Dimitris Plantzos:              .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Jenny Albani:                                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Dionysis Mourelatos:                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Konstantinos Soueref                       .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Stavros Alifragkis                               .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

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Thu 4 April 2019

Fields

The 23rd edition of Building Material seeks papers on the idea of the field in architecture.

March 31 2019 - March 31 2019

The notion of fields is used in architecture to connote ambiguity. Whether used spatially or figuratively, it introduces into the discourse a tension in the acknowledgement of boundary. It is like a fabric, a carpet, a pattern with the potential for endlessness (or at least an ill-defined edge), yet the terminology of the field equally embodies concepts of containment and segregation. It slips between roles as an all encompassing terrain while remaining one part perhaps of a greater whole. Within the discourse of architecture, fields can capture a range of concerns, including: the imagery and nature of non-hierarchical space; the extents of professional and disciplinary knowledge; and the possibilities of boundaries, not as rigid delineating barriers, but instead as rich transitional zones. In all this there may be many fields of shifting centres.

Topics for consideration may include (but would not be limited to) the following:
    •    How are the limits of architectural knowledge defined and where does it transition with other disciplines?
    •    In what ways does the architectural design process respond to multiple physical, cultural and social conditions?
    •    What has been the impact of field-based compositional principles on the history of architecture?
    •    How, and in what form, do boundaries manifest themselves in the areas of urbanism, building, and technology?
    •    If the extent of a given field may be mapped, what does this tell us of its central focus?

Building Material 23 invites submissions that explore the range of architectural possibilities inherent within the word ‘fields’ in Ireland and elsewhere. Submitted articles must not have been published, nor be under consideration for publication, either online or in print. Written submissions should be a maximum of 4000 words and should be analytical and critical rather than descriptive. While inviting submission of academic papers, it also seeks and encourages interesting essays that fall beyond the academic pale. Shorter articles are welcome, as are graphic works.

Building Material is a peer reviewed journal and selected submissions shall be assessed by two independent reviewers. Submissions not intended for peer-review are also welcome. A distinction will be made between peer-reviewed research articles and other material.

Completed articles should be addressed to the editor(s) by 01 March 2019. To facilitate the process of double-blind peer review, please ensure that all contact details are contained in a covering email and that authors’ identifying details are not included in the article file.

Acceptance decisions will be communicated by 29 March 2019. Articles should be prepared in MS Word, double-spaced at a minimum 11-point font size. Notes should adopt the UWA Oxford Referencing style (footnote format), as outlined here (http://guides.library.uwa.edu.au/ld.php?content_id=14872881). Single quotation marks should be used throughout. Image files should be formatted as individual jpg files at 300dpi.

Informal queries regarding submission may be addressed to the editor(s). All submissions and correspondence should be addressed to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Previous issues of Building Material are now available to view on JSTOR. Hardcopies may be purchased via architecturalassociation.ie

Building Material is an annual architecture journal, joint published by the Architectural Association of Ireland (AAI), the All-Ireland Architecture Research Group (AIARG), and the Irish Architecture Foundation (IAF).

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Sun 31 March 2019

CFP: Facing Post Socialist Heritage / Conference

Call for Abstracts

Budapest

March 04 2019 - March 04 2019

Call for Abstracts (deadline: 04 March 19)

Guidelines and Instructions

Site of the conference:  www.urb.bme.hu/en/doconf2019

Contacts: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Facing Post-Socialist Urban Heritage

4-5 October 2019, Budapest, Hungary

The third international doctoral / postdoctoral conference organised by the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Faculty of Architecture, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME).

www.urb.bme.hu

Throughout Europe, current urban challenges are posed by large-scale ensembles of modernity as a result of post-WWII development on both sides of the Iron Curtain. The urb/doconf 2019 is the third in a series of a doctoral / postdoctoral conference, to be organised on a biannual basis, which will provide a comparative overview of current doctoral research into the physical - built and natural - environment within post-socialist cities in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), and post-soviet Asia.

Those invited include doctoral researchers – doctoral students, candidates or post-doctoral researchers (maximum five years after obtaining the doctorate degree) - specializing in architecture, urban design, urban planning or landscape architecture. The BME Department of Urban Planning and Design wishes to promote cooperation among doctoral institutions, building up a network for future generations of scholars through their specific fields of research related to post-socialist urban heritage.

Main Conference Topics

The doctoral conference series is dedicated to post-WWII (after 1945) urban heritage of post-socialist cities focusing on the main research topics of the department. In order to compare different perspectives, we welcome papers examining the physical environment under the following sessions:

1. mass housing neighbourhood

2. urban space for reuse

3. waterside urban fabric and landscape transformation

Considering the three main conference topics/sessions, we are interested in different research methodologies: theoretical frameworks, comparative studies, morphological case studies, historic approach, research by design methodology, etc.  

We seek contributions that (i) test the post-war heritage positions in the changing ideological context after the fall of the Iron Curtain, (ii) investigate the mutual impact of the spatial turn and the critique of functionalism on urbanity, or (iii) examine the role of post-socialist legacy in the formation of new identities.

In addition to theoretical questions, we wish to find pragmatic approaches when responding to the new challenges of sustainability and determining what kind of protection tool-kit is capable of addressing large-scale ensembles problems. Our aim is to discover special similarities and dissimilarities within the physical environment of post-socialist cities, discuss a wide range of options (from preservation to sustainable renewal processes) and create a network of doctoral researchers.

Abstract Submission

Please send an extended abstract (400-500 words) and a brief academic biography (70-100 words).

Please use the template on the website: https://goo.gl/pBZQ34

Send your abstract to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Abstract deadline – 04 March 2019  / notification of acceptance – 31 March 2019

 

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Mon 4 March 2019

New Publications

Architecture & Culture

Architecture & Culture:  Aims and Scope

Architecture and Culture, the international, peer-reviewed journal of the Architectural Humanities Research Association, investigates the relationship between architecture and the culture that shapes and is shaped by it. Whether culture is understood extensively, as shared experience of everyday life, or in terms of the rules and habits of different disciplinary practices, Architecture and Culture asks how architecture participates in and engages with it – and how both culture and architecture might be reciprocally transformed.

Architecture and Culture publishes explorations that are rigorously speculative, purposively imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating. From historians of culture and architecture, from geographers, anthropologists and other social scientists, from architects and urban designers, from film-makers, animators and other artists, from thinkers and writers of all kinds, established and new, it solicits essays, critical reviews, interviews, fictional narratives in both words and images, art and building projects, and design hypotheses. Architecture and Culture aims to promote a conversation between all those who are curious about what architecture might be and what it can do.

 

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Wed 9 January 2013

Architecture and Feminisms Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

Edited by Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting

Set against the background of a ‘general crisis’ that is environmental, political and social, this book examines a series of specific intersections between architecture and feminisms, understood in the plural. The collected essays and projects that make up the book follow transversal trajectories that criss-cross between ecologies, economies and technologies, exploring specific cases and positions in relation to the themes of the archive, control, work and milieu. This collective intellectual labour can be located amidst a worldwide depletion of material resources, a hollowing out of political power and the degradation of constructed and natural environments. Feminist positions suggest ways of ethically coping with a world that is becoming increasingly unstable and contested. The many voices gathered here are united by the task of putting critical concepts and feminist design tools to use in order to offer experimental approaches to the creation of a more habitable world. Drawing inspiration from the active archives of feminist precursors, existing and re-imagined, and by way of a re-engagement in the histories, theories and projected futures of critical feminist projects, the book presents a collection of twenty-three essays and eight projects, with the aim of taking stock of our current condition and re-engaging in our precarious environment-worlds.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Becoming a Feminist Architect

Karin Reisinger and Meike Schalk

This issue is one of three publications subsequent to the 13th International Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) Conference “Architecture & Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies,” which was held at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm, between the 17th to 19th November in 2016.1 The conference gathered around 200 participants and included over a hundred paper presentations and performances, as well as two exhibitions. The overwhelming interest in reviving the feminist discourse in architecture gave us the opportunity to reflect on the process of becoming feminist architects. Becoming a feminist architectis a complex process, rife with strategies, tactics, frictions, advances and retreats, that will continue to engage us in the future as it does now. This became clear through the presentations of a wide range of different feminist architectural practices, both historical and contemporary, their diverse theoretical underpinnings and methodological reflections and speculations. The present publication assembles a series of vital discussions that emerged at the event, including accounts of careful and creative ways of becoming feminist architects by “knowing and doing otherwise,”2 “practising ‘otherwise’,”3 or doing architecture in other ways,4the implication of which is a rethinking and expansion of the conventional scope of architectural practice. With these three publications – this edition of Field Journal, the Architecture and Culture issue “Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects,” and the anthology Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies – we have made an effort to create space for as many of the voices and positions present at the conference as possible.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Architecture, Festival and the City

Edited by Jemma Browne, Christian Frost, Ray Lucas

Historically the urban festival served as an occasion for affirming shared convictions and identities in the life of the city. Whether religious or civic in nature, these events provided tangible expressions of social, cultural, political, and religious cohesion, often reaffirming a particular shared ethos within diverse urban landscapes. Architecture has long served as a key aspect of this process exhibiting continuity in the flux of these representations through the parading of elaborate ceremonial floats, the construction of temporary buildings, the ‘dressing’ of existing urban space, the alternative occupations of the everyday, and the construction of new buildings and spaces which then become a part of the background fabric of the city.

This book examines how festivals can be used as a lens to examine the relationship between city and citizen and questions whether this is fixed through time, or has been transformed as a response to changes in the modern urban condition. Architecture, Festival and the City looks at the multilayered nature of a diverse selection of festivals and the way they incorporate both orderly (authoritative) and disorderly (subversive) components. The aim is to reveal how the civic nature of urban space is utilised through festival to represent ideas of belonging and identity. Recent political and social gatherings also raise questions about the relationship of these events to ‘ritual’ and whether traditional practices can serve as meaningful references in the twenty-first century.

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Fri 21 December 2018