AHRA Newsletter:
August-September 2016

If you would like to receive this information by e-mail, and you haven't yet signed up as a member of AHRA, please follow the link to the AHRA website for details of how to register on the database. Membership is currently free and is open to all humanities researchers working in Schools of Architecture and related disciplines both in the UK and overseas. Please also encourage colleagues to register here: http://www.ahra-architecture.org/registration/

If you are planning a research event that you would like to promote through the newsletter, please log in to the AHRA website and post the details by clicking on the 'Post Your Event' link under the 'Events' menu. These details will appear on the 'Future Events' page within a few days (subject to moderation) and will also be included in the next issue of the Newsletter. If you have not logged in to the site before, you should enter your default username ('firstnamelastname') and click on the 'forgotten your password' link for further instructions.

To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The next newsletter will be issued in October 2016

New Events

CFP: JID special issue: Interior design creative scholarship

Registration of interest: 1 July 2016

Journal of Interior Design

July 01 2017

A special journal issue dedicated to creative scholarship in interior design and its allied disciplines and practices to be published early 2018.

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Sat 1 July 2017

Professional Practices in the Built Environment

University of Reading, UK

April 27 2017 - April 28 2017

The nature and value of professional judgment and knowledge is increasingly being called into question as new technologies give access to new ways of working. This conference provides an opportunity for practitioners and academics to come together to understand and learn from differ- ent models of professionalism across Architecture and the Built Environment, over time and across the globe. The conference is part of the AHRC funded Evidencing and Communicating the Value of Architects project http://www.valueofarchitects.org.

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Thu 27 April 2017

Professional Practices in the Built Environment

University of Reading, UK

April 27 2017 - April 28 2017

The nature and value of professional judgment and knowledge is increasingly being called into question as new technologies give access to new ways of working. This conference provides an opportunity for practitioners and academics to come together to understand and learn from differ- ent models of professionalism across Architecture and the Built Environment, over time and across the globe. The conference is part of the AHRC funded Evidencing and Communicating the Value of Architects project http://www.valueofarchitects.org.

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Thu 27 April 2017

Performing, Writing Symposium March 2017

Wellington, New Zealand

March 09 2017 - March 19 2017

Performing, Writing: a symposium in four turns is an international interdisciplinary research-focussed event occurring in March 2017, Wellington NZ run in association with Performance Arcade.

This event imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. 

What creative, dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

The proposal deadline has recently been extended to 15 July 2016 and the event dates have changed since the first posting in April this year.

See the website for details: www.performingwriting.com

Dr Julieanna Preston

Professor of Spatial Practice

Toi Rauwharangi College of Creative Arts

Te Kunenga o Purehuroa Massey University

Wellington, Aotearoa

 

 

 

 

 

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Thu 9 March 2017

Performing, Writing 2017

Wellington, New Zealand

March 04 2017 - March 09 2017

There is something nearly indescribable yet palpable in the transfer between embodied works of art and the textual inscriptions that imagine, forecast, relate, explain, document orco-exist alongside them. 

This parallel and often intersecting dialogical relationship bears out the ways that practices such as live art, performance, theatre, architecture, spatial design, dance and music depend, expand upon, repeat and exacerbate practices such as script and score-writing poetry, literary fiction, art criticism, ficto-criticism, curatorial writing, site writing  and writing associated with creative practice-led research.

 

This synaptic condition is what John Hall calls out in On Performance Writing, with pedagogical sketches (2013) as gestures of actualisation, performing thru; writing as itself performance, the very literal taking place over time, slowly, meticulously, and performance as an event that is more than the writing where the writing’s concern is with its relation to the full context of the performance. (61) 

 

Here we find shared attentiveness towards the shaping of words, breathe, body,  object, time and space, to effectively and affectively curate subjective encounters.

 

Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured 

with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. What creative, 

dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of 

an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-

ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a 

new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

 

Proposals due 1 July 2016. See the website for details: www.performingwriting.com

 

Dr Julieanna Preston

Professor of Spatial Practice

Toi Rauwharangi College of Creative Arts

Te Kunenga o Purehuroa Massey University

Wellington, Aotearoa

 

Mobile +6421 842616

Skype user name buildingartpractice

www.julieannapreston.space

 

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Sat 4 March 2017

Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns

Call for Contributions

Wellington, NZ

March 01 2017 - March 05 2017

Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns  imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. What creative, dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

The symposium seeks to attract contributions from a wide range of creative practices such as architects, designers, performance artists, writers, musicians, dramaturges and dancers. It is structured as four turns playing out across several days of experiences, textures, flavours and modalities linking acts of performing with acts of writing.

A FULL SYMPOSIUM PROPOSAL should include:
A Cover Sheet (sent as a separate word document) listing your name(s), proposal title, affiliation(s), contact details.

A Proposal (sent as a separate word document no more than 2 A4 pages) that presents, describes, imagines and contextualises your contribution to the symposium. Images, drawings and links are encouraged. Avoid revealing your identity in this document. Identify which of the day provocations your proposal links to best and how. List any equipment required. Unlike most conferences and symposiums where presenters are allocated 20 minutes and the mode of delivery defaults to Powerpoint projections in a darkened room, this event challenges us to inhabit time, space and body with a broader spectrum of possibilities. For example, one could occupy 5 minutes of each day at the same time, prompt a participatory exercise, or incite an oration or inscription in relation to the local architecture. The symposium programme will be crafted to support the variety of proposal responses.

Submit proposals to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by end of day 1 July 2016 (NZ time).
Questions can be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
FAQ will be posted and updated on the website: http://www.performingwriting2017.com

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Wed 1 March 2017

Theory’s History 196X-199X

Challenges in the historiography of architectural knowledge

Brussels

February 09 2017 - February 10 2017

Theory’s history, 196X – 199X
Challenges in the historiography of architectural knowledge

KU Leuven, Belgium

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN BRUSSELS
9th-10th of February, 2017.
Submission deadline: 15th of June, 2016

 

In recent international literature addressing the history of 20th century architectural theory, the year 1968 is indicated as a decisive moment, giving rise to a ‘new’ architectural theory. From that moment onwards, emphasis was no longer placed on the aesthetics of architecture, but on its critical potential. Yet, according to some scholars, this intensification of theory was short-lived. A presence of coexisting and even contradictory paradigms derived from very different epistemic domains (anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, social sciences, etc.) led to a setback of theory, resulting in an end-of-theory atmosphere in the 1990s.     
It is not a coincidence that the so called death of architectural theory concurred with the upsurge of anthologies on architectural theory that collect and classify referential texts. Instead of burying theory, these anthologies had an additional effect, namely to institutionalise it. In other words, they offered both closure to a past period and also defined the locus of a next period of theorisation, invoking a ‘historical turn’. At the same time architectural discourses, and especially architectural historiography, were engaging with new theoretical fields such as gender studies or postcolonial studies, giving rise to a continued production of theoretically informed books and articles.

The goal of this conference is to discuss the methodological challenges that come along with this historical gaze towards theory, by focusing on the concrete processes in which knowledge is involved. By screening the unspoken rules of engagement that the accounts of post-war architectural theory have agreed to and distributed, we want to point at dominant assumptions, biases and absences. While anthologies inevitably narrate history with rough meshes, we believe it is time to search for those versions of theory formation that have slipped through these nets of historiography, in order to question the nature of theory and the challenges it poses to historians. How do you do historical research on something as intangible as theory, or in a broadened sense, the knowledge of architecture?

 

Practical information

Please visit our website for up to date information and for the full CFP: architecture.kuleuven.be/theoryshistory

This two-day conference will be held in Brussels on Thursday and Friday 9th - 10th February 2017. The conference aims to bring together both young and established scholars from every discipline that is able to engage with the topics outlined above. Confirmed keynotes are Joan Ockman, Ákos Moravánszky and Łukasz Stanek.

We’re happy to receive abstracts of up to 300 words until the 15th of June, 2016. Information on how to submit is provided on our website. Abstracts will be anonymously reviewed by an international scientific committee. Authors will be notified of acceptance on the 15th of July 2016. In order to provide a solid conference, we expect full papers one month in advance of the conference, i.e. 1st of January, 2017.

Please note that there will be a conference fee for participants of maximum €150 and a reduced price for students.

For any other questions, please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Thu 9 February 2017

Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

13th AHRA International Conference

School of Architecture Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm, Sweden

November 17 2016 - November 19 2016

The 2016 AHRA conference will address connections between architecture and feminisms with an emphasis on plural expressions of feminist identity and non-identity. From radical feminist, to lesbian feminist, to black feminist, to post-colonial feminist, to crip feminist, to queer feminist, to trans feminist, to Sara Ahmed’s feminist killjoy, to feminist men, to posthuman feminist, to the liberal and neoliberal feminist, to material feminist, to marxist feminist, to eco feminist, to Roxane Gay’s popular Bad Feminist and many others, even to post feminist voices, the claim to feminism continues to be tested and contested. And this conference will be no exception. Between architecture and feminisms our specific focus will be upon transversal relations across ecologies, economies and technologies. Specifically, we are concerned with the exploration of ecologies of practice, the drawing out of alternative economies, and experimentation with mixed technologies, from craft to advanced computational technologies.

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Thu 17 November 2016

Drawing Futures Conference and Book Launch: Call for Works

The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London

November 11 2016 - November 12 2016

Drawing Futures is a new international peer-reviewed conference on speculative drawing for art and architecture, founded by the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. Chaired by Professor Frédéric Migayrou, Laura Allen and Luke Pearson, the inaugural Drawing Futures Conference will be held on 11-12 November 2016 at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London.  

This 2-day conference will focus on the discussion of how the field of drawing may expand synchronously alongside technological and computational developments. Bringing together practitioners from many creative fields, the conference will discuss how drawing is changing in relation to new technologies for the production and dissemination of ideas.  

Far from killing it, technology promises new avenues for the drawn as a speculative method – and its futures are ours to shape.

Keynote speakers
Pablo Bronstein, Neil Spiller and Madelon Vriesendorp.

Tickets
All tickets for the 2-day event include conference registration, lunch and refreshments, opening and closing drinks receptions. Full Price tickets also include a copy of the Drawing Futures book published by UCL Press.

Full Price (Earlybird): £185
Full Price: £250
Students: £50 (Proof of student status will be required at registration)

Register now at http://www.drawingfutures.com

Drawing Futures is part of Bartlett 175, a special programme of events celebrating 175 years of architectural education at UCL. 
Follow us on Twitter for more news at @BartlettArchUCL and @DrawingFutures

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Fri 11 November 2016

International Conference inter≈ photography and architecture

Call for papers

Museo Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

November 02 2016

Call for papers

Modern architecture cannot be altogether understood without the dissemination of its images. The blending between photography and architecture proved to be particularly fruitful in constructing the modern visual discourse. Architects became conscious of the full potential of photography beyond its documentary value, and photographers of architecture —architects themselves occasionally—, shortly became important composers and broadcasters of that narrative.

Simultaneously, the discourse around photography has become more and more complex, expanding its scope and surpassing a more traditional approach. XIXth century photographic documentation gradually gave in its way to new forms of exploration of reality, opening a wide range of possibilities and raising photographic and visual culture to a different level.

Photographers do not develop their work in a documentary sense as much as they seek to build a new reality perceived in subjective terms. They are involved in creating a new way of understanding the world. There is some consensus —as well as a subtler criticism— on the overflowing of their disciplinary boundaries. Those boundaries seem to be blurred bringing photography closer and closer to visual arts, claiming this way that same autonomy and their own place in the construction of contemporary discourse. The question arises as to whether the relationship between photography and architecture provides new creative processes, not just simple combinations, and whether they affect and experience each other in such a way they bring to light new ways of understanding both fields.

This International Conference aims to delve into the essential cogitations associated to the development of both disciplines in a contemporary discourse, particularly on their mutual interactions, interferences, intersections and interpretations. The Conference is structured around the following topics:

Interactions. Mixed profiles: Architectural Photographers vs Photographic Architects / The photographic gaze as an analytical and design tool for architects to create spaces / Architecture and Image / The Visual Discourse of Architecture

Interferences. Photography as a Historical Builder / History of Photography vs. Architectural History / The Documentary Photographs of Architecture.

Intersections. Architecture and Urban Landscape in Photography / Architecture under the artistic view / Photography: Piece of art or Document / Discursive and Iconic Records.

Interpretations. Museums and Galleries: Curating Architecture / Photography and the Dissemination of Architecture / The role of visual media in shaping the modern and contemporary discourse / Digital photography / Image as a virtual construction.

The committee encourages experienced and junior scholars to send abstracts, Spanish and/or English, exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Selected authors will have the opportunity to present their contributions during the Conference. Accepted papers will appear in the conference proceedings publication that will be indexed in major international databases. Authors could be also awarded and invited to submit an extended version to be published as a chapter in a future publication edited by the organization. Please send a 400-word abstract along with a short CVby the on-line platform at the Conference website. Info by e-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Abstracts deadline submission: February 25th, 2016.
Notification: March 14th, 2016
Paper submission deadline: September 1st, 2016
Sessions will take place at Museo Universidad de Navarra

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Wed 2 November 2016

The Scholarship of Social Engagement Symposium: call for papers

October 20 2016 - October 21 2016

The University of Kansas is convening a symposium that assembles internationally recognized thought leaders on the subject of critical engagement. These practitioners and their work are increasingly being highlighted at conferences, through exhibits, and in literature. Our symposium seeks to investigate the theoretical underpinnings of such work and translate these action-based community engagement efforts into interdisciplinary and theoretically-based scholarship. We will convene this group of scholars in order to establish a framework for the critical inquiry and review of the public impact of socially engaged discourse and design. The symposium will gather a group of scholars, practitioners, critics, and historians to discuss different aspects, forms, and features of social engagement that have developed across time and regions.

Abstract due: April 15, 2016

Additional information on the symposium, submission, calendar of events, registration, and organizers can be found at the website below.

Contact: email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Thu 20 October 2016

Summer School: Understanding Urban Transformations through Data

An ESRC Strategic Network, Data and Cities as Complex Adaptive Systems (DACAS)

Manchester School of Architecture, University of Manchester & Manchester Metropolitan University

September 12 2016 - September 16 2016

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Mon 12 September 2016

Architecture & the Spaces of Information (Part 2)

A Symposium

Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London

September 11 2016 - September 11 2016

This one-day symposium accompanies the publication of Architecture & Culture, issue 4.1: Architecture & the Spaces of Information (guest edited by Ruth Blacksell and Stephen Walker). Speakers will discuss overlapping practical, material, production and media environments across the disciplines of architecture, art and editorial design, and how these connections have advanced relationships between audience/user/reader and architectural space.

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Sun 11 September 2016

New Publications

Architecture & Culture

Architecture & Culture:  Aims and Scope

Architecture and Culture, the international, peer-reviewed journal of the Architectural Humanities Research Association, investigates the relationship between architecture and the culture that shapes and is shaped by it. Whether culture is understood extensively, as shared experience of everyday life, or in terms of the rules and habits of different disciplinary practices, Architecture and Culture asks how architecture participates in and engages with it – and how both culture and architecture might be reciprocally transformed.

Architecture and Culture publishes explorations that are rigorously speculative, purposively imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating. From historians of culture and architecture, from geographers, anthropologists and other social scientists, from architects and urban designers, from film-makers, animators and other artists, from thinkers and writers of all kinds, established and new, it solicits essays, critical reviews, interviews, fictional narratives in both words and images, art and building projects, and design hypotheses. Architecture and Culture aims to promote a conversation between all those who are curious about what architecture might be and what it can do.

 

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Wed 9 January 2013

Industries of Architecture

Edited by Katie Lloyd Thomas, Tilo Amhoff, Nick Beech

At a time when the technologies and techniques of producing the built environment are undergoing significant change, this book makes central architecture’s relationship to industry. Contributors turn to historical and theoretical questions, as well as to key contemporary developments, taking a humanities approach to the Industries of Architecture that will be of interest to practitioners and industry professionals, as much as to academic researchers, teachers and students. How has modern architecture responded to mass production? How do we understand the necessarily social nature of production in the architectural office and on the building site? And how is architecture entwined within wider fields of production and reproduction—finance capital, the spaces of regulation, and management techniques? What are the particular effects of techniques and technologies (and above all their inter-relations) on those who labour in architecture, the buildings they produce, and the discursive frameworks we mobilise to understand them?

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Fri 5 February 2016

Architecture and Capitalism – Solids and Flows: Vol. 5, Issue 2

Catharina Gabrielsson and Helena Mattsson (Editors)

‘Capitalism is back!’

Nancy Fraser, “Behind Marx’s Hidden Abode: For an Expanded Conception of Capitalism”, New Left Review 86 (2014) p. 55

 

The aim of this issue of Architecture and Culture is to revisit the relationship between architecture and capitalism, not by reverting back to ‘critique’, ‘post-criticality’ or even ‘resistance’, but from an outset of addressing their complex relationality. Going beyond the historic, industrial and building-based scenario offered by Peggy Deamer (ed.) in Architecture and Capitalism (2014), extending on and problematizing both architecture and capitalism allows us to address this relationship from other perspectives. We propose a thematic heading of ‘solids and flows’ to open up for less predictable, essentially non-linear, and more imaginary investigations.

Solids – which is how architecture most readily is perceived, as tied to buildings, symbolic and semiotic capital, manifestations of private or public wealth … but equally capturing the inaccessibility of corporate power; the ‘trust’ of credit ratings that certify risk-taking in the bank and finance sector; the closure and immovability of capital locked up in tax havens and offshore financial centres.

Flows – as in the fickle movements of global capitalism through networks of finance and speculation (and the arbitrary effects of their hitting the ground)… but equally capturing recent re-orientations in architecture towards relational or ecologist approaches, undoing the physical object, with an emphasis on process, agency and affect. Spanning across the virtual and the real, the material and the immaterial, the relationship between architecture and capitalism increases in complexity as regards to the production of identity, the generation of desire, and the forging of spatial relations. By juxtaposing solids and flows as tropes or figures of thought, we envisage the possibility for new and transversal connections; ones that, by exposing the gaps, discontinuities and ruptures in, through and between architecture and capitalism carry the potential for non-determinate futures.

 

Call for papers for this issue

From this outset, we invite rigorously speculative, purposely imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating contributions that explore architecture and capitalism from unexpected angles – bearing in mind the slippery slope of too-narrowly confined definitions. This call is explicitly trans- and cross-disciplinary in nature, encouraging critical and emerging scholarship dealing with capitalist studies to engage with architecture as a tradition of projecting, shaping, assessing and experiencing the built environment; and scholars and practitioners in architecture and neighbouring disciplines to relate more closely to the dynamics of capitalism and its current transfigurations, brought to the fore through the advent of concepts and theories such as noologi, affective or immaterial labour, economies of debt, new Marxist scholarship, and neo-materialist ontologies. How can we think about these conjunctions of materialisation and immaterialisation, visibility and invisibility, solidification and vaporization? How can they be analysed, illustrated, represented, designed or described? We call for papers, essays, manifestos, historical inquires, fieldwork notes, photographic compilations, drawing materials etc. that address this broad and fluid topic in creative and original ways.

Contributions might address the following themes:

  • Processes and techniques of commodification and marketization in architecture
  • Dimensions of value(s) in and through architecture, alternative values, and ‘value diremption’ (the ‘Other’ of value)   
  • Theories on the spectacular, affect/affective and experiential in architecture and their potential for generating the unexpected
  • The spatial, material and localized conditions for central agents in global capitalism (bank and finance sector, corporate HQ, digital platforms etc.)
  • The relationship between design, housing tenures and property ownership
  • The architectural imports of spatial occupancy and appropriation
  • Dispossession, austerity and the architecture of poverty
  • Thickened and thinned out spaces, secondary homes, and non-habitation
  • Real estate-driven architectures of affect

 

Contributions can range from short observations or manifestos, creative pieces, or visual essays, to longer academic articles. Architecture and Culture is published in both on-line and hard-copy formats: there is capacity to host on-line contributions that operate in a different way to paper-based work.

 

Production schedule

CfP                             May 2016

Response                  1 September 2016 at latest

Editors selection     October 2016

Peer Reviewing       October-December 2016

Authors Revisions  December- February 2017

Editorial checking  March 2017

Copy to publisher   1 April 2017

Issue publication    July 2017

 

For author instructions, please go to ‘Instructions for Authors’ at

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rfac20&page=instructions#.VzRvBmN7BHg

 

Upload submissions at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/archcult/

Or via ‘submit online’ at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rfac

 

If you have any queries or require further information, please contact:

Catharina Gabrielsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Helena Mattsson: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Mon 16 May 2016

New Courses

Architecture MA

University of Westminster, London

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Thu 15 October 2015

MA Architectural History, The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL

The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, London

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA in Architectural Design

School of Architecture, University of Sheffield

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA in Urban Design

School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield

Course web site

web site thumbnail available soon

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Wed 9 January 2013

MA Spatial Practices: Art, Architecture, and Performance

University College for the Creative Arts

Course web site

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Thu 24 December 2009

MSc in Architectural History and Theory, University of Edinburgh

Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (ESALA), ECA, University of Edinburgh

Course web site

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Thu 14 May 2015

MSc Urban Studies

University College London

Course web site

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Thu 24 December 2009