AHRA Newsletter:
October-November 2014

If you would like to receive this information by e-mail, and you haven't yet signed up as a member of AHRA, please follow the link to the AHRA website for details of how to register on the database. Membership is currently free and is open to all humanities researchers working in Schools of Architecture and related disciplines both in the UK and overseas. Please also encourage colleagues to register here: http://www.ahra-architecture.org/registration/

If you are planning a research event that you would like to promote through the newsletter, please log in to the AHRA website and post the details by clicking on the 'Post Your Event' link under the 'Events' menu. These details will appear on the 'Future Events' page within a few days (subject to moderation) and will also be included in the next issue of the Newsletter. If you have not logged in to the site before, you should enter your default username ('firstnamelastname') and click on the 'forgotten your password' link for further instructions.

To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The next newsletter will be issued in December 2014

 

New Events

European Architectural History Network / Fourth International Meeting

EAHN 2016 Dublin Meeting Call for Sessions and Round Tables

Dublin, Ireland

June 02 2016

In accordance with its mission statement, the EAHN is organizing a meeting which is intended to increase the visibility of the discipline, foster transnational, interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches to the study of the built environment, and facilitate the exchange of research results in the field. Although the scope of the meeting is European, members of the larger scholarly community are invited to submit proposals related not only to European architecture but also to that of the rest of the world.

The main purpose of the meeting is to map the general state of research in disciplines related to the built environment, to promote discussion of current themes and concerns, and to foster new directions for research in the field. Session proposals are intended to cover different periods in the history of architecture and different approaches to the built environment including landscape and urban history. Parallel sessions will consist of either five papers or four papers and a respondent, with time for dialogue and questions at the end. In addition, a limited number of roundtable debates addressing key issues in the field will also take place at the meeting. Proposals for these should re-map, re-define, or outline the current state of the discipline. They will typically consist of a discussion between panel members and encourage debate with the audience. The goal is to create a forum in which different scholars can present and discuss their ideas, research materials and methodologies.

 

 

Permalink to this event page

Thu 2 June 2016

Architecture and Resilience on a Human Scale 2015

The University of Sheffield

September 10 2015

This conference focuses on research, strategies and projects that are testing how we can build local resilience in preparation for major societal challenges, such as global warming, scarcity of resources, increase in extreme weather events and shifts in demographics. It will focus on how the emergence of collaborative economies, new technologies, and new forms of governance play out at neighbourhood level, and what contribution architects and architecture are making to shaping this changing context.

Whilst we are based in a school of architecture, we are keen to hear from many disciplines and practitioners including those in architecture, urban design, planning, landscape and ecology, geography, social sciences and other fields related to spatial studies. We welcome all those interested in neighbourhood research and projects on climate change mitigation and adaptation, co-working methodologies and designing with communities, case studies of neighbourhoods projects that contribute to growing local resilience and ‘Architecture 3.0,’ concerning questions of agency and empowerment.

 

Permalink to this event page

Thu 10 September 2015

7th Symposium of Architecture, Culture and Spirituality

Nature and the Ordinary: Sacred Foundations of Architecture, Culture and Spirituality

Ghost Ranch, New Mexico, United States of America

June 18 2015 - June 21 2015

The Forum for Architecture, Culture and Spirituality invites participation in its Seventh Annual Symposium. ACS 7 will take place in the serene setting of the vast and inspiring New Mexico desert in the southwest of the United States. We selected this remarkable place to invite us to contemplate and live the theme of the symposium: “Nature and the Ordinary: Sacred Foundations of Architecture, Culture and Spirituality.”  Although the symposium will focus on landscape and culture in the context of the ‘quotidian,’ we will consider submissions addressing other issues related to ACS and include them in at least one open session during ACS7. These sessions will provide a forum to present what is currently being studied, discussed, practiced, or taught in the area of architecture, culture and spirituality.

As in previous ACS meetings, the symposium will be structured around several subtopics focusing on various aspects of the general theme, and the number of attendees will be kept small on purpose to secure an atmosphere conducive to personal connections and in-depth dialogue. Optional meditation will be offered each morning and there will be some free time for connecting to oneself, other people and the surroundings.

Permalink to this event page

Thu 18 June 2015

IFW2015: Nomadic Interiors

Interiors Forum World 3th International Conference

Politecnico di Milano School of Architettura e Società

May 21 2015 - May 22 2015

Nomadic Interiors: CALL FOR PAPER/CONFERENCE/BOOK

Identity and diversity – whether cultural, ethnic, religious or political – mark our contemporary global context on a daily basis. We live in an age that might be defined by migration, of population flow, by the movement of people, of information, of knowledge… From continent to continent, from nation to nation, from region to region, from city to city, individuals or groups of people overcome geographic borders and cultural or linguistic barriers in search of an economic comfort zone; for a new lease on life for their children; as well as for study purposes; for tourism or to experience new lifestyles and social relations.
Old and new nomads, inscribe traces, invisible or real, on the places they cross and where they stop, generating linguistic, cultural, lifestyle contaminations. They remark, delete or reconfigure their identity, absorbing or rejecting differences. By traveling and stopping – temporarily or permanently – they retrace paths followed by others or design new ones. It’s a movement of global intensification that configures ways of living, inhabiting, and being in the world.
On the other hand, the concept of the Interior has profoundly changed. It is no longer tied to the domestic and work sphere only – a dichotomy that Walter Benjamin used to tie to the capitalist society of the end of Nineteenth century – it now includes all places of associated and collective life. The metropolitan environment, specifically, is characterized by a succession of «internities», sometimes with (transient, feeble, fleeting) or mutating borders, that everyone re-owns in a more or less permanent way. “The nomadic space, a pure interior”, writes George Teyssot, underlining how the movement – of people as well information – has also changed the original meaning of Interior architecture.
Proximity, Hybridization, Multiculturalism, Mobility, Identity, Diversity seem to characterize spaces for contemporary life, culture, training, hospitality, leisure, work, commerce and social relations.

Permalink to this event page

Thu 21 May 2015

The Art History of Architectural History

AAH2015 41st Annual Conference & Bookfair

Sainsbury Institute for Art, UEA, Norwich, UK

April 09 2015 - April 11 2015

Art history and architectural history are sister disciplines… or are they? How many art history departments regard architectural history as a core component of their provision? What might art history students miss if architectural history were not part of their curricula? Perhaps art objects and architectural objects are so radically different their study cannot be shared. Or perhaps there are modes of enquiry that can be developed to mutual benefit. This session reviews the art history/architectural history relationship in several ways. One way is to excavate those moments when art and architectural history were tightly bound together: in the very formation of art history as a discipline, for example, when both art and architecture were natural objects of study. Other ways might be: investigations of the parallel developments of formalism in art and architectural history; of architectural history’s relation to the ‘new art history’; of the ways in which architectural history might adopt recent developments in object studies, global art history, and art writing. Academics dealing with contemporary architecture find themselves wrestling with debates that in other disciplines may be more abstract or indirect: How does money or power represent itself in visual form? How does the general public (whoever they may be) understand form? How does government use aesthetics to communicate? All of these things are, and always have been, live in architecture. Perhaps this might be part of a case for making architectural history more central to art history. If so, what implications would it have for our curricula and our pedagogy?

Permalink to this event page

Thu 9 April 2015

AALTO BEYOND FINLAND ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

2nd Alvar Aalto Researchers Network Seminar: Call for papers

Rovaniemi, Finland 16-18 February 2015

February 16 2015 - February 18 2015

The 2nd Alvar Aalto Researchers Network Seminar, “Aalto beyond Finland. Architecture and Design” aims to create a network of researchers interested in the work of the Finnish architect Alvar Aalto. The meeting in Rovaniemi, in February 2015, will be an opportunity to present up-to-date research and provide a significant meeting point for those fascinated by Aalto’s buildings and projects, in a relaxed and collegial atmosphere.

Aalto’s work has had an exceptional impact beyond Finland since the opening of his office in Turku in 1927. Before World War II, his furniture was exhibited in strategic venues in Europe and America, from which Aalto established a solid network of professional contacts. During the post-war period, he took on many assignments and received great recognition in various foreign countries. His buildings, scattered around the world, as well as his unrealised projects, contributed to spreading Aalto’s design method in different architectural communities, thereby proving its validity outside Finland. Even countries in which Aalto did not design any projects or construct any buildings, such as Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Spain, and Portugal, were influenced by his work. Although recent scholarly studies have contributed to an exploration of Aalto’s work abroad and its impact in the international context, they are fragmented, dwelling on national questions, without a holistic view. The 2nd Alvar Aalto Researchers Network Seminar “Aalto beyond Finland. Architecture and Design” strives for a comprehensive survey of the impact of Aalto’s architectural and design works abroad, in order to highlight those thematic communalities and connections among different international experiences.

Permalink to this event page

Mon 16 February 2015

annual conference 2015, all-ireland architecture research group

Dublin, Ireland

January 30 2015 - January 31 2015

ALL-IRELAND ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH GROUP

                                              a-iarg

 

Call for Sessions Fourth Annual Meeting UCD Dublin January 29-30, 2015

 

Permalink to this event page

Fri 30 January 2015

Production Sites: Resituating the culture of architectural knowledge

The Bartlett/UCL and University of Sydney

January 15 2015

Production sites is a symposium that scrutinises new cultures of architectural knowledge by examining the sites where knowledge is produced.  As a discipline, architecture has largely framed knowledge through the idea of building types, formal styles or sites for design action. Yet participatory design modes, digital technologies, and event-based models present alternatives that probe the divisions between real and  imaginary sites,  experiential and ideatic encounters, aesthetics and technology. The theme is a response to fundamental transformations in terms of how cultural knowledge and meaning are currently produced. 

Permalink to this event page

Thu 15 January 2015

Industries of Architecture: Relations, Process, Production

11th International AHRA Conference

School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, Newcastle University, UK, and various venues around Newcastle

November 13 2014 - November 15 2014

This two and a half day conference invites architectural theorists, historians, designers and others to explore the industrial, technical and socio-economic contexts in which building is constituted that are all too often sidelined within the architectural humanities. Industries of Architecture will also host a number of open-structured debate-oriented workshops with the aim of bringing into the discussion those working in building, technology, law, practice management, construction or in industry together with researchers in the architectural humanities. In addition, the opening night features public screenings of a series of artists’ films that explore the production of architecture, including the work of Harun Farocki and Allan Sekula.

Permalink to this event page

Thu 13 November 2014

Building with Light: the Legacy of Robert Elwall

An International Symposium on Architectural Photography

London

November 13 2014 - November 14 2014

The Royal Institute of British Architects announces an international symposium on architectural photography in conjunction with the first major retrospective of the British architectural photographer Edwin Smith (1912-1971), whose prolific work helped redefine the notion of post WW II Britishness.

The symposium will honour the legacy of Robert Elwall (1953-2012), an acclaimed British historian of architectural photography and curator, since 1976, of the RIBA's Photographs Collection that now bears his name.  With some million and a half architectural images, the Robert Elwall Photographs Collection is one of the most extensive resources for the study of the influence of photography on architecture and the creative process.

The symposium will be held 13 -14 November 2014 in London.


Permalink to this event page

Thu 13 November 2014

“Composite Cities”

7th edition of EURAU

Faculty of Architecture of Istanbul Technical University

November 12 2014 - November 15 2014

The theme refers to the compositeness of our cities occurring in various forms and various scales; ranging from ever increasing complexity of one-through new urban emergences adding up to the existing urban environment and continuously redefining our urban experience- to tranquility of another-still holding different urban conditions stitching together to an enriched urban experience. Thus the conference aims to enable a medium to discuss the complex relationship between urban form and urban experience through the composite character of our cities explained in four topics-possible states of composite being: hybrid city, morphed city, fragmented city  and mutated city. The conference is expected to evolve around the question of “how?”s of architectural practice for the composite city. Hence, the essentials of architectural realities- scale, order, space, place, program, content, identity …- will define the backbone of the discussions.

The abstract submission deadline is extended to April 30, 2014

Permalink to this event page

Wed 12 November 2014

Design and Research: Shared Territories

Inquiring Inquiry; Research as Design

Suzhou, China

October 28 2014

The Design Research Institute at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU) in Suzhou, China is organising its inaugural exhibition Design and Research: Shared Territories (28 October – 11 November 2014). The exhibition is curated by academics at XJTLU - Dr Anuradha Chatterjee (Chief Curator), Dr Marian Macken (Curator) and Dr Thomas Fischer (Co-curator and Design Research Institute Director). The exhibition features peer reviewed, mixed media contributions by scholars, academics and designers from Australia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Finland, United States, United Kingdom, and of course China, from interdisciplinary fields of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, fine art, industrial design, biological sciences, and language. Design and Research: Shared Territories explores two themes: Inquiring Inquiry and Research as Design. The aim is to inquire and expose, rather than present a known/given view of design research. To this end, the exhibition is approached as a form of scholarship, offering a productive space for creating new ways of knowing and critical insights into existing ways of knowing. Information on exhibition venue and opening times will be posted soon. Please save the date if you are in China and wish to attend. 

Permalink to this event page

Tue 28 October 2014

New Publications

Architecture and the Paradox of Dissidence

Edited by Ines Weizman

Architecture and the Paradox of Dissidence maps out and expands upon the methodologies of architectural action and reinvigorates the concept of dissent within the architectural field. It expands the notion of dissidence to other similar practices and strategies of resistance, in a variety of historical and geographical contexts.The book also discusses how the gestures and techniques of past struggles, as well as ‘dilemmas’ of working in politically suppressive regimes, can help to inform those of today.

This collection of essays from expert scholars demonstrates the multiple responses to this subject, the potential and dangers of dissidence, and thus constructs a robust lexicon of concepts that will point to possible ways forward for politically and theoretically committed architects and practitioners.

Permalink to this publication

Mon 25 November 2013

Mapping the Emergent Hybridities of Urbanism: New Spatial Praxis Types

Eugenia Fratzeskou

LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, 2014 (ISBN-13: 978-3-8484-2698-0) is now available from morebooks.de and other major booksellers worldwide.

The present study investigates the new roles of the spatial praxis, as formed in the contemporary context of urbanism. The challenges and possibilities of re-orientating the spatial praxis are investigated in conjunction with the unresolved discords regarding the issue of (re)presentation that has dominated philosophy, cosmology, mathematics, cartography, software engineering, animation, network visualisation, art, architecture and numerous other fields. New ways of ‘designing’ the emergent hybrid spaces of urban interaction through mapping the untamed ‘waves’ of the datascape are discussed through the study of the changing urban condition and in particular, of the site as a field of interactive urban flows, the urban neo-nomads and their trajectories. Giving a physical form to those hybrid spaces, poses as an important possibility and challenge not only for contemporary architecture, but also, for the spatial praxis across a number of related fields including site-specific and media art, drawing, interaction design, urban and social studies, e-communication and many others

Permalink to this publication

Tue 4 March 2014

The Architecture of Luxury

Annette Condello

Over the past century, luxury has been increasingly celebrated in the sense that it is no longer a privilege (or attitude) of the European elite or America's leisure class. It has become more ubiquitous and now, practically everyone can experience luxury, even luxury in architecture. Focusing on various contexts within Western Europe, Latin America and the United States, this book traces the myths and application of luxury within architecture, interiors and designed landscapes. Spanning from antiquity to the modern era, it sets out six historical categories of luxury - Sybaritic, Lucullan, architectural excess, rustic, neoEuropean and modern - and relates these to the built and unbuilt environment, taking different cultural contexts and historical periods into consideration. It studies some of the ethical questions raised by the nature of luxury in architecture and discusses whether architectural luxury is an unqualified benefit or something which should only be present within strict limits. The author argues how the ideas of permissible and impermissible luxury have informed architecture and how these notions of ethical approval have changed from one context to another. Providing voluptuous settings for the nobles and the leisure class, luxury took the form of not only grand palaces, but also follies, country and suburban houses, private or public entertainment venues and ornate skyscrapers with fast lifts. The Architecture of Luxury proposes that in Western societies the growth of the leisure classes and their desire for various settings for pleasure resulted in a constantly increasing level of 'luxury' sought within everyday architecture.

http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409433217

 

Permalink to this publication

Thu 23 October 2014

Architecture and the Welfare State

Mark Swenarton, Tom Avermaete, Dirk van den Heuvel (Eds.)

In the decades following World War Two, and in part in response to the Cold War, governments across Western Europe set out ambitious programmes for social welfare and the redistribution of wealth that aimed to improve the everyday lives of their citizens. Many of these welfare state programmes - housing, schools, new towns, cultural and leisure centres – involved not just construction but a new approach to architectural design, in which the welfare objectives of these state-funded programmes were delineated and debated. The impact on architects and architectural design was profound and far-reaching, with welfare state projects moving centre-stage in architectural discourse not just in Europe but worldwide.

This is the first book to explore the architecture of the welfare state in Western Europe from an international perspective. With chapters covering Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Sweden and the UK, the book explores the complex role played by architecture in the formation and development of the welfare state in both theory and practice.

Permalink to this publication

Mon 10 November 2014