AHRA Newsletter:
February-March 2018

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To promote other items of interest (new books, courses, other research resources etc) please send details by email to Stephen Walker at:

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The next newsletter will be issued in April 2018

New Events

Smartness? between discourse and practice

15th Architectural Humanities Research Association International Conference

Department of the Built Environment, TU Eindhoven

November 15 2018 - November 17 2018

Increasingly the world around us is becoming ‘smart.’ From smart meters to smart production, from smart surfaces to smart grids, from smart phones to smart citizens. ‘Smart’ has become the catch-all term to indicate the advent of a charged technological shift that has been propelled by the promise of safer, more convenient and more efficient forms of living. When combined, all these so called ‘smart’ devices amount to a ubiquity of computing which is heralding a new technological paradigm and a fundamental shift in the way buildings and cities are both experienced and understood. Through a variety of sensors, cities and buildings are now defined not by the people that inhabit them, nor their functions, nor their identity or history, but simply as increasingly larger sets of data. Such sets are then processed to immediately adjust and alter (physical) conditions in real time. Although such large scale collection and use of (big) data has an inevitable effect on the way people live and work, there has yet to emerge a clear answer to how architecture and cities should respond and assimilate such brave new world.

Call for Sessions (see website for further details and guidance)

***EXTENDED DEADLINE*** JANUARY 22, 2017: submission deadline for session proposals 

FEBRUARY 19, 2018: notification of selected session proposals

A call for papers will follow in March 2018.

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Thu 15 November 2018

A World of Architectural History

Bartlett School of Architecture, Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London, UK

November 02 2018 - November 04 2018

The conference’s aim is to critique and celebrate the latest advances within architectural history globally over the last few decades, by focusing upon the word ‘global’ in two senses: 

  • Geographically, referring to the increasing inclusion of all parts of the world in more complex and multiple discourses of architectural history;
  • Intellectually, the ongoing expansion of architectural history into other academic subjects, plus the reception of ideas/themes from those subjects.

The conference will take place around the same time as the publication of Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture (Bloomsbury Press), although as a separate event. Recognition will be given to a more inclusive approach to architectural history that seeks to incorporate the histories of all countries/regions, and to the significant contributions now being made through interdisciplinary links with other subjects. As such, the conference will represent the forefront of the field internationally and also discuss where architectural history ought to head in future. Conference presenters will include those from the wide range of subject areas within the Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment and leading figures in architectural history across the world. Papers will consist of a balance of those by invited speakers and those selected via an open call.

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Fri 2 November 2018

Urbanism @ BORDERS

Interdisciplinary Global Workshop for Research Network (Call for Papers or Documentary Films)

Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

September 05 2018 - September 08 2018

  1. Border research emphases on the discourse analysis on critical issues and connotation of separation - demarcation – segregation and conflicts and translated and theorizing these issues in various patterns of urbanism. Borders determine the degree of how regions are positioned in the global maps with the condition with which regions are valued, categorised and marked by its capacity to create individual geographical identities and unique settlement patterns. Borders define socially and economically incompatible systems that influence the nature of mobility of goods, human traffic, and economic transactions that suggest temporal, subdued, blurring socio-cultural entities defined by urban orders. Borders create these blurring urban orders along its boundaries defined by lack of cohesiveness with either sides of a border.

Borders are more than geographically defined separations, but accounts of metamorphoses and metaphors that two neighbouring states are defined by the economy, politics, culture, and religion – manifested by its typological entities.

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Wed 5 September 2018

Call for Papers: Building as Service: People, Politics and Governance

ISPA International Society for the Philosophy of Architecture 4th International Conference

Colorado Springs, USA

July 25 2018 - July 25 2018

The fact that buildings are so strongly associated with various power holding empires, nation-states and other forms of civilization is widely recognized in the study of both the history of people and their buildings. From Pericles’s Acropolis to Niemeyer’s Brasilia, architecture has long been associated with political figures and institutions. Buildings such as the British Parliament, the Russian Kremlin, and the U.S. Capitol stand out not just as iconic architecture, but also as representative of the politics, institutions, and culture of the nation. The connection between architecture and politics is evident, yet precisely how are political concepts captured in the form and function of buildings?

A strong link between the buildings and the political philosophies of a nation-state or other ruling body is the building’s use. We know that buildings serve the establishment and maintenance of a governing body, but do they contribute to maintaining a particular ideological belief system? Or is the connection more explicit, such as a wall, literally dividing two peoples whose belief system itself remains autonomous from association with buildings?

Taking the stance that buildings hold both deterministic effect and autonomous disassociation, how do architects and politicians act? Considering the contemporary context, to what extent should architects design public structures intended to capture the social and political ethos of the people? Do architects have an obligation to address the socio-political in their work? Is this kind of moral obligation misplaced? Is it rather that the work of architects is already tacitly, inextricably part of the political process? And to what extent?

On the other hand, do rulers utilize building to achieve their political goals and ideals? Is building fundamental to realizing ideological goals or a mere part of the process? Are there styles or typologies particularly conducive to establishing and maintaining power? Is the association of contemporary democracy with classical Greek and Roman architecture appropriate or warranted? And is the style’s reverence intrinsic or learned? Could the Romanesque not equally as well serve the same purpose?

Assuming that buildings are already intrinsically enmeshed within the governing body’s authority, can a single building work against that same authority? Can a building undermine an entire regime? Some may argue that the Berlin Wall marked the end of the Communist rule over Eastern Germany, but how much weight can a building hold on the integrity of a governing body? How effective, for instance, are efforts to rebuild Iraq? Considering that American contractors are building structures programmatically and aesthetically at odds with the resident socio-political climate, the very act of building in Iraq may be taken as an offense to the Iraqi nation-state. Although not all instances of international exchange are as contentious as this one, can architecture be incompatible with particular political concepts or systems?

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Wed 25 July 2018

2018 Interstices Under Construction Symposium CFP

2018 Interstices Under Construction Symposium: Presence

University of Auckland, Auckland, in collaboration with Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

July 12 2018 - July 14 2018

We invite you to submit an abstract for the forthcoming Interstices ‘Under Construction Symposium’, inspired by the spark of presence and its spatial effects. Following the symposium, papers will be sought for Interstices issue. 20 on this same theme. For publishing options and the required formatting, please refer to the Guidelines for Submissions on the Interstices website. 

The symposium will be run in conjunction with a colloquium led by Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Harold Marshall and other principal speakers to be announced.

Abstracts of 300 words may be forwarded to Sue Hedges up to 28 February 2018:.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dates: Keynote lecture on the evening of Thursday 12 July 2018 followed by full days on 13 and 14 July

Venue: University of Auckland, Symonds Street, Auckland, in collaboration with Auckland University of Technology

Conference organisers:

Ross Jenner, Andrew Barrie, Julia Gatley, University of Auckland

Andrew Douglas, Sue Hedges, Auckland University of Technology

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Thu 12 July 2018

From Building to Continent: How Architecture makes Territories

Kent School of Architecture (UK)

June 28 2018 - June 29 2018

Cultural landscape refers to landscapes shaped by humans through habitation, cultivation, exploitation and stewardship, and has influenced thinking in other fields, such as architecture. Generally, architecture has been subsumed within cultural landscape itself as a comprehensive spatial continuum. Yet standard architectural histories often analyse buildings as isolated objects, sometimes within the immediate context, but typically with minimal acknowledgement of wider spatial ramifications. However, buildings may become spatial generators, not only in the immediate vicinity, but also at larger geographic scales. ‘Buildings’ in this case include architectural works in the traditional sense, as well as roads, bridges, dams, industrial works, military installations, etc. Such structures have been grouped collectively to represent territories at varying scales.

 

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Thu 28 June 2018

Generosity

An international conference at the Welsh School of Architecture,Cardiff, UK

Cardiff, Wales, UK

June 28 2018 - June 29 2018

Generosity is associated with the act of giving or sharing more than is necessary, with bravery, with notions of a benefactor and a recipient, and with a quality of being plentiful or expansive. From a stance of celebrating and questioning architecture's potential for generosity, this call for papers invites academics and creative practitioners to explore ways in which architecture aspires to, or may be expected to, give more than is necessary. This could be considered within the current economic context of austerity or within the broader historic context of a discipline often working in frameworks focused on cost and quantitative measurement. Reflections are welcomed which critically examine themes of Generosity as related to architecture and related fields, whether they be from a conceptual or theoretical position, embedded in everyday processes and expectations of practice, or from considerations of procurement, regulation, and policy.

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Thu 28 June 2018

15th Annual AHRA PhD Student Symposium: Using History

Call for Papers

Aalto University, Helsinki

June 11 2018 - June 12 2018

Recent decades have seen several critical accounts of history, reviewing its methods and premises, questioning its narrative techniques and revealing its uses and abuses for political ends. Against becoming a refuge from the present, or a consolation, this kind of history sees its task as reminding societies and collectives of things that have been forgotten or covered up.
Additionally, architectural research has been in dialogue with different specialised fields of history: cultural and political history, but also economic history, history of media and technology, history of everyday life. Studies in conservation history have relied on technical history and history of science.
To study this multi-faceted relationship, our conference calls PhD candidates to reflect on the various uses of history and historical knowledge in architectural research and practice in the most broad sense. Speakers are also welcome to reflect on the role of history in their own research. Proposals will be welcomed from PhD candidates in the areas of theory and history of architecture and landscape, conservation and heritage, urban design and history, as well as relevant adjacent fields and interdisciplinary research.

Key Dates:

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 16 February 2018 Successful applicants informed: 13 March 2018
Submission of extended abstracts (1200 words): 1 June 2018

AHRA Symposium: 11–12 June 2018
Tour on Finnish modernism and the architecture of Alvar Aalto (optional): 12 June 2018

Key Contacts:

For enquiries relating to the student Symposium in the first place please contact:

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
For submission of abstracts: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address); .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
For enquiries relating to the EAHN conference please contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Mon 11 June 2018

ACSF Symposium on Displacement and Architecture

Paper Submission Deadline Extended to February 12, 2018

coral Gables, Florida

May 23 2018 - May 25 2018

SYMPOSIUM UPDATE

The 10th Annual ACSF Symposium | DISPLACEMENT & ARCHITECTURE 

Call for Paper Submissions extended to February 12, 2018

 

The Architecture, Culture and Spirituality Forum’s 10th Annual Symposium will feature innovative and expansive discussions among scholars and practitioners on the spiritual and physical displacements of the 21st century, and the creation and transformation of the relationships between spirituality, culture, and landscapes that we now occupy and will occupy in the future. As in the past, the symposium will be structured as a balance between invited guest speakers, conference sessions, tours, exhibitions, and time for retreat, reflection and meals together. 

 

Featured Speakers include:

 

Karsten Harries, Department of Philosophy, Yale University. 

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, University of Miami School of Architecture

Ronald Rael, College of Environmental Design, University of California Berkeley

Eike Roswag, Technical University Berlin and Eike, Roswag, Roswag, Architekten

 

Exhibition: Sheltering Survivors, at the Coral Gables Museum

 

The symposium will take place May 23 - 25, 2018 in Coral Gables, Florida. It will be held in partnership with the School of Architecture at the University of Miami, the Coral Gables Museum, the AIA Miami, Miami Center for Architecture and Design, and the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. The due date for paper proposals has been extended to February 12th. See the ACSF website for full information. http://www.acsforum.org

 

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Wed 23 May 2018

Displacement and Architecture Symposium 2018 | Coral Gables, Florida hosted by ACSF

Displacement and Architecture

Coral Gables, Florida

May 22 2018 - May 25 2018

Displacement and Architecture Symposium 2018 | Miami

On May 22-25, 2018, the Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Forum (ACSF) will host a symposium, “Displacement and Architecture,” in partnership with the School of Architecture, University of Miami; the Coral Gables Museum; AIA Miami; and The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. The symposium aims for a broad discussion among practitioners and scholars on the tangible and intangible dimensions of displacement, addressing the physical as well as spiritual ramifications of natural disaster, forced migration, or deportation. Topics may include places and cities impacted by migration, including the spatial dimensions of the shelter, camp, or religious building

 

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Tue 22 May 2018

Open volunteer position: new book review editor: SAHGB

March 15 2018 - March 15 2018

Architectural History, the journal of the SAHGB, publishes original, peer-reviewed research on buildings, the built environment, the history of architectural theory, and architectural historiography in all places and periods.  Published by Cambridge University Press, it is one of the leading academic journals for the history of architecture in the world.
The editorial team seeks a new book review editor.  The post-holder will work closely with the lead editor, the deputy editor, and five other team members in the production of the journal, which is issued once each year.  The position involves: commissioning reviews (roughly 10 per volume, 750-1000 words each), reviewing submissions, liaising with authors, editing manuscripts for style and content, and traveling to editorial meetings (2-3 per year).  Experience in academic writing and editing is essential.
The role represents an exciting opportunity to help contribute to the future success of the journal.  Like all roles in the SAHGB, it is voluntary.  Please submit a statement of interest, along with a CV to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by March 15, 2018.

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Thu 15 March 2018

Building Material

"Public": Call for contributions

March 02 2018

Public: The 22nd edition of Building Material seeks papers on the theme of the public in architecture.
Architecture is a public affair, its impact shared if not always evenly distributed. The vacillating boundaries of what constitutes public life, public realm or the 'public interest' are forever a contested space in which the ideologies of architecture are made explicit. A public act most commonly commissioned by private parties, the design and realisation of the built environment requires a reciprocity between collective and individual needs that often results in complex relationships of competing interests. The question, perhaps, is where does the public aspect of architecture reside and how might it be calibrated?
Building Material 22 invites submissions that explore the range of architectural possibilities inherent within the word 'public' in Ireland and elsewhere. Submitted articles must not have been published, nor be under consideration for publication, either online or in print. Written submissions should be a maximum of 4000 words and should be analytical and critical rather than descriptive. While inviting submission of academic papers, it also seeks and encourages interesting essays that fall beyond the academic pale. Shorter articles are welcome, as are graphic works. Building Material is a peer reviewed journal and all submissions shall be assessed by two independent reviewers. Submissions not intended for peer-review are also welcome. A distinction will be made between peer-reviewed research articles and other material. 

 

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Fri 2 March 2018

New Publications

Architecture & Culture

Architecture & Culture:  Aims and Scope

Architecture and Culture, the international, peer-reviewed journal of the Architectural Humanities Research Association, investigates the relationship between architecture and the culture that shapes and is shaped by it. Whether culture is understood extensively, as shared experience of everyday life, or in terms of the rules and habits of different disciplinary practices, Architecture and Culture asks how architecture participates in and engages with it – and how both culture and architecture might be reciprocally transformed.

Architecture and Culture publishes explorations that are rigorously speculative, purposively imaginative, visually and verbally stimulating. From historians of culture and architecture, from geographers, anthropologists and other social scientists, from architects and urban designers, from film-makers, animators and other artists, from thinkers and writers of all kinds, established and new, it solicits essays, critical reviews, interviews, fictional narratives in both words and images, art and building projects, and design hypotheses. Architecture and Culture aims to promote a conversation between all those who are curious about what architecture might be and what it can do.

 

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Wed 9 January 2013

John Ruskin and the Fabric of Architecture

Anuradha Chatterjee

Through the theoretical lenses of dress studies, gender, science, and visual studies, this volume assembles Ruskin’s theory of surface architecture, or the adorned “wall veil.” This book positions Ruskin as having proposed an unorthodox definition of architecture as surface, highlighting his major contribution to the field and an important moment in the history of architectural modernity.

John Ruskin and the Fabric of Architecture examines how the creative act in architecture, analogous to the divine act of creation, was viewed as a form of dressing. By adding aesthetic elements that had no use, and taking inspiration from the ‘veil’ of women’s clothing, Ruskin believed that buildings could be transformed into meaningful architecture. This volume presents a theory of textile analogy in architecture based on morality and gender that equals the power of Gottfried Semper’s historicist perspective. Ruskin’s textile analogy connects the realms of soul, dress, gender, and body in architecture.

This book would be beneficial to students and academics of architectural history and theory, gender studies and visual studies who wish to delve into the Ruskin’s theories and to further understand his capacity for thinking beyond the historical methods. The book will also be of interest to architectural practitioners who are keen to explore the beginnings of the contemporary phenomenon of surface architecture. 

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Mon 8 January 2018

Herb Greene’s Generations: Six Decades of Collage Art and Architecture

Herb Greene

A comprehensive account of his vast artistic projects including collage, architecture, and armatures that date back to the 1960’s. This “picture book” is organized to showcase large-scale images of Mr. Greene’s architectural work alongside his collage paintings and Armature drawings in a way that reveals the unified philosophy behind all of his work. Its purpose is to tell a story of the important interrelationships between art, science, and philosophy, which is described with simple narratives that are juxtaposed alongside these image. Based in Berkeley, California, Mr. Greene’s early work is at the forefront of placemaking architecture that has begun to sweep our urban cities.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Architecture and Feminisms Ecologies, Economies, Technologies

Edited by Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting

Set against the background of a ‘general crisis’ that is environmental, political and social, this book examines a series of specific intersections between architecture and feminisms, understood in the plural. The collected essays and projects that make up the book follow transversal trajectories that criss-cross between ecologies, economies and technologies, exploring specific cases and positions in relation to the themes of the archive, control, work and milieu. This collective intellectual labour can be located amidst a worldwide depletion of material resources, a hollowing out of political power and the degradation of constructed and natural environments. Feminist positions suggest ways of ethically coping with a world that is becoming increasingly unstable and contested. The many voices gathered here are united by the task of putting critical concepts and feminist design tools to use in order to offer experimental approaches to the creation of a more habitable world. Drawing inspiration from the active archives of feminist precursors, existing and re-imagined, and by way of a re-engagement in the histories, theories and projected futures of critical feminist projects, the book presents a collection of twenty-three essays and eight projects, with the aim of taking stock of our current condition and re-engaging in our precarious environment-worlds.

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Mon 8 January 2018

Becoming a Feminist Architect

Karin Reisinger and Meike Schalk

This issue is one of three publications subsequent to the 13th International Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) Conference “Architecture & Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies,” which was held at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm, between the 17th to 19th November in 2016.1 The conference gathered around 200 participants and included over a hundred paper presentations and performances, as well as two exhibitions. The overwhelming interest in reviving the feminist discourse in architecture gave us the opportunity to reflect on the process of becoming feminist architects. Becoming a feminist architectis a complex process, rife with strategies, tactics, frictions, advances and retreats, that will continue to engage us in the future as it does now. This became clear through the presentations of a wide range of different feminist architectural practices, both historical and contemporary, their diverse theoretical underpinnings and methodological reflections and speculations. The present publication assembles a series of vital discussions that emerged at the event, including accounts of careful and creative ways of becoming feminist architects by “knowing and doing otherwise,”2 “practising ‘otherwise’,”3 or doing architecture in other ways,4the implication of which is a rethinking and expansion of the conventional scope of architectural practice. With these three publications – this edition of Field Journal, the Architecture and Culture issue “Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects,” and the anthology Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies – we have made an effort to create space for as many of the voices and positions present at the conference as possible.

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Mon 8 January 2018