Past Events

This page provides links and information about relevant past events.

The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza

Interstices Under Construction symposium: Call for Papers

Auckland University of Technology and University of Auckland, New Zealand

May 26 2017 - May 28 2017

Event web site

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We invite scholarly submissions on the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677), for a special issue of Interstices journal and the annual Interstices symposium to be held in Auckland, New Zealand, 26-28 May 2017. The intent is to further consolidate the recent revival of interest in Spinoza’s thought, and to reaffirm his status as an enormously powerful thinker of contemporary relevance.  Papers on any aspect of Spinoza studies are thus welcomed. But the more specific aim of the symposium and journal issue is twofold: firstly, to extend the burgeoning scholarship on Spinoza into the domains of study parsed by Interstices, namely arts and architecture, and secondly, to situate Spinoza’s philosophy within the particular locus of New Zealand, Australasia, the South Pacific, and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Each of these aspects will be tackled in separate sessions or separate days of the symposium.
            With regard to the first aim, we welcome submissions that put Spinoza’s philosophy in productive proximity with a particular artform or an individual work of art, whether literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, dance, performance, etc. — or that have an especial focus on any of the numerous artistic and literary figures who are known to have read Spinoza appreciatively and in whose works Spinozist shadings might be discerned (Goethe, Coleridge, George Eliot, Thomas Hirschhorn, etc.). Contributors might like to think of this event and journal issue as extending, in the direction of arts and architecture, the very fine work done by the anthology Spinoza Beyond Philosophy (2012, ed. Beth Lord).
Since Interstices’s particular interest is in architectural studies, we would be keen to see contributions that consider Spinoza as helpful for thinking any of the design and spatial disciplines (architecture, urban design, landscape, geography, interior design, and so on). Contributors might also choose to take ‘architecture’ in the sense of ‘structure’, in which case not only would built environments and tectonics be the subject of analysis, but also the very structure of Spinoza’s texts, the extraordinary way in which his texts are wrought (the famous geometric architecture of the Ethics, for example).
We also invite submissions that don’t necessarily fall under any of the artistic disciplines listed above, and that interpret “arts” in the broadest possible sense. Spinoza’s philosophy predates the modern idea of a differentiated domain of the arts, and so the Latin word that Spinoza uses — ars — has the older and broader sense of skill or craft or ability or proficiency.[1] We thus welcome submissions that are about ‘arts’ in this more general sense — for example, about what Spinoza teaches us about the arts of living (ars vivendi) or the arts of constructing a liberal polity (ars politica, government, statecraft).
With regard to the second aim, we invite submissions on any aspects of Spinoza studies that have a connection to New Zealand, Australia, the South Pacific, or Asia-Pacific and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Such papers might, for example, examine the historical reception and interpretation of Spinoza in New Zealand, Australia, the Oceanic “sea of islands”, or any proximate sister region.[2] The idea is to give geographic concreteness and local specificity to the interpretation of Spinoza — to see how Spinoza might be or has been read in New Zealand and the Pacific, and inversely to see how our ways of thinking about New Zealand and the Pacific might be productively inflected by reading Spinoza.

[1] See Moira Gatens, “Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist”, European Journal of Philosophy 23, no. 1 (2015), p. 3.
[2] The reference is to Epeli Hau’ofa’s “Our Sea of Islands”, The Contemporary Pacific 6, no. 1 (1994), 147–161.

 

Abstracts of 300 words, along with a short biographical statement of 100 words, to be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), by midnight nzst, 30th January 2017. For purposes of peer review, the abstract should be sent in a separate self-contained file with no identifying information in it. Please send Microsoft Word files only (doc or docx). Abstracts will be vetted through a process of blind peer review.
Selected papers from the symposium will be invited for revision, peer review, and publication in the subsequent issue of Interstices. If you are unable to attend the symposium in New Zealand, but wish to submit a paper for the journal issue, please send the full and completed paper to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 31st May 2017.
Further inquiries can be directed to the convenor Eu Jin Chua, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), Farzaneh Haghighi, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or to Susan Hedges, the Coordinating Editor of Interstices, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

A fuller Call for Papers / Discussion Document is attached as a PDF file, or available online at http://www.interstices.ac.nz/news-events/

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Buildings in Society International III - An interdisciplinary Approach.

Swedish History Museum, Stockholm

May 11 2017 - May 14 2017

Event web site

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Building studies fall too often into the disciplinary gaps between architectural history, archaeology and social anthropology. The Buildings in Society International conference is an attempt bridge those gaps, to draw from all these approaches and examine how people have created buildings and responded to them. The forthcoming conference would like to examine how people have been creating and using buildings, how they have responded to them, and how the buildings have been perceived. It will consider a diversity of built constructions - including dwellings and public buildings, sheds and manor houses, secular and sacral structures.

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The Politics of Environments: Architectures, Natures and Data

Tallinn, Estonia

April 20 2017 - July 23 2016

Event web site

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Two themes stand out prominently in discussions, projects and strategies that are at the forefront of contemporary urbanisation. It is, on one hand, the question of ecology, where the city and architecture are reconceptualised in "green" terms such as sustainability, resilience, metabolic optimisation and energy efficiency. On the other hand is the cybernetic question, where the futures of architecture and urbanisation are staked upon the pervasive use of digital communication, interactive technologies, ubiquitous computing, and the "big data". Moreover, these two questions have become increasingly intertwined as two facets of a single environmental question: while real-time adjustments, behaviour optimisation and "smart" solutions are central to urban environmental agenda, the omnipresent network of perpetually interacting digital objects constitutes itself a qualitatively new environment within which urban citizens are enfolded. But as digital networks become our "second nature," we also hark back to the models derived from the "first nature".

With the growing pressure on architects, urbanists and planners to deliver ecological and techno-informational solutions, with (self-)monitoring of citizens "behaviour", optimisation of the buildings "performance", and smoothing of urban "flows", and with the respective substitution of democratic politics by automated governance models, it is ever more important to interrogate the historical, theoretical, methodological and epistemological assumptions beneath the above set of processes that can be described, following Michel Foucault, as environmental governmentality. These questions will be explored under three thematic tracks.

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SAHGB Annual Prizes in Architectural History

April 01 2017 - March 31 2017

Event web site

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The Society of Architectural Historians Great Britain (SAHGB) is accepting nominations and submissions for its growing suite of internationally-renowned prizes. These prizes and awards are the most prestigious in the country for the discipline of architectural history. They are open to all historians of the built environment, and you do not need to be a member to participate. Nominations are normally accepted from members, but unsolicited nominations will be considered on merit.

We particularly encourage submissions from:
Masters and doctoral students in relevant disciplines
Heritage professionals
Practising architects, in particular those working with historic environments
Full-time academics at all career stages in relevant disciplines
The society welcomes submissions of work relating to the history of the built environment from all disciplines, including but by no means limited to:
History
Geography
Architecture
Art History


On as diverse a range of themes as possible, including:
Histories of design
Histories of planning
Histories of construction
Histories of buildings in use
Histories of interiors and interior design
Histories of practice and professionalism
We are looking for work that it is innovative, ambitious and rigorous in the history of the built environment. Previous winners of our awards and prizes have gone on to have esteemed careers in architectural history and heritage.

Please consider submitting work and encourage students, colleagues and friends to do so too. Further information and methods of submission can be found on our website (http://www.sahgb.org.uk).

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Performing, Writing Symposium March 2017

Wellington, New Zealand

March 09 2017 - March 19 2017

Event web site

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Performing, Writing: a symposium in four turns is an international interdisciplinary research-focussed event occurring in March 2017, Wellington NZ run in association with Performance Arcade.

This event imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. 

What creative, dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

The proposal deadline has recently been extended to 15 July 2016 and the event dates have changed since the first posting in April this year.

See the website for details: www.performingwriting.com

Dr Julieanna Preston

Professor of Spatial Practice

Toi Rauwharangi College of Creative Arts

Te Kunenga o Purehuroa Massey University

Wellington, Aotearoa

 

 

 

 

 

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Performing, Writing 2017

Wellington, New Zealand

March 04 2017 - March 09 2017

Event web site

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There is something nearly indescribable yet palpable in the transfer between embodied works of art and the textual inscriptions that imagine, forecast, relate, explain, document orco-exist alongside them. 

This parallel and often intersecting dialogical relationship bears out the ways that practices such as live art, performance, theatre, architecture, spatial design, dance and music depend, expand upon, repeat and exacerbate practices such as script and score-writing poetry, literary fiction, art criticism, ficto-criticism, curatorial writing, site writing  and writing associated with creative practice-led research.

 

This synaptic condition is what John Hall calls out in On Performance Writing, with pedagogical sketches (2013) as gestures of actualisation, performing thru; writing as itself performance, the very literal taking place over time, slowly, meticulously, and performance as an event that is more than the writing where the writing’s concern is with its relation to the full context of the performance. (61) 

 

Here we find shared attentiveness towards the shaping of words, breathe, body,  object, time and space, to effectively and affectively curate subjective encounters.

 

Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured 

with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. What creative, 

dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of 

an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-

ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a 

new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

 

Proposals due 1 July 2016. See the website for details: www.performingwriting.com

 

Dr Julieanna Preston

Professor of Spatial Practice

Toi Rauwharangi College of Creative Arts

Te Kunenga o Purehuroa Massey University

Wellington, Aotearoa

 

Mobile +6421 842616

Skype user name buildingartpractice

www.julieannapreston.space

 

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