Upcoming AHRA Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming AHRA events.

Events took place before 2009:

Post your own event

Research Encounters via Architecture’s Methods

16th AHRA PhD Student Symposium

Newcastle University, UK

April 22 2020 - April 23 2020

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

The Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) 16th AHRA PhD Student Symposium 2020, to be hosted by the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, takes as its departure point the tendency for architectural research to be dissected into distinct disciplinary categories, including ‘architectural history’, ‘architectural theory’ and ‘architectural design’. This categorisation implies that architectural research requires methods to be applied from outside of its discipline, rather than conceiving of architectural research as a discipline with its own research methods. How then might we consider our encounters with architectural research in a way that links to our own ways of working and conception of the wider world?

Encountering architectural research in this way means acknowledging that architecture is not only inherently interdisciplinary, but that it is also a field offering its own distinct practices and ways of relating to society and culture. It is such re-thinking that, as this symposium proposes, opens the possibility for architectural research to be situated as a core research discipline. This re-consideration of architectural research is part of an ongoing project conceived by the Architectural Research Collaborative (ARC) at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University.

Some suggested themes that may relate to research encounters via architecture’s methods:

  • Encounters between the interrelated scales of architectural research: from macro to micro; from infrastructures, assemblages, ecologies, buildings to construction details.
  • Encounters within iterative approaches to architectural research that may consider: conversations, specifications, experimentations, prototypes and risk-taking.
  • Encounters between architecture and its relations to social, economic, geographic, cultural, historical, conceptual and material forces and practices.
  • Encounters of projective thinking, that may include: creative practice research methods, processes of translation between drawings and buildings, the imagining of better worlds and speculative futures

Submissions of proposals (one proposal per applicant) are invited from registered PhD candidates in Architecture and its related disciplines. The call is open to students from institutions world-wide and registration for the symposium is free of charge.

The deadline for receipt of all proposals is Friday 20th December 2019.

Please email paper abstracts/workshop proposals to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Successful candidates will be notified by Friday 24th January 2020.

Permalink to this event page

Housing and the City

!7th Annual International AHRA Conference

University of Nottingham

November 19 2020 - November 21 2020

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

In the early twentieth century, a desire to master the workings of the city linked it explicitly to the provision of housing. The processes of ‘the urban’ became an ‘ism’, the multiplication of houses became housing. In the twenty-first century, we are, it seems, witnessing the rise of new modes of urban domesticity – of ‘co-living’ for young urban professionals, of ‘co-housing’ of various kinds, of ‘live-work’ units and of a kind of domesticated working. Sometimes, these trends are born of economic necessity; sometimes, they are driven by aspirations of inclusion, solidarity and sharing. In either case, they are promoted as desirable styles of life, experiments in housing and working that are linked to the promise of a new kind of collectivity, a new kind of city. Our concern is to investigate the link between housing and urbanism, if not to disentangle it, at least to interrogate it, in order to ask what these new forms of living and working might mean for the city and its future.

This conference aims to investigate the historical and theoretical genealogy of the following question: what does it mean to be at home in the city in the twenty-first century, in an age of evolving social and work patterns, increased geographical mobility and climate concern?

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines such as architecture, urbanism, sociology, philosophy, geography, anthropology, as well as written and visual contributions from the arts, such as photography or film to explore this question.

Permalink to this event page

Page 1 of 1 pages