Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

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The European Architectural History Conference 2020

Call for papers

University of Edinburgh, UK

June 10 2020 - June 13 2020

Event web site

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The call for papers (sessions) and discussion positions (round tables) is now LIVE. The deadline is 20 September 2019, and proposals should be submitted to the Session Chairs, whose details may be found here: https://eahn2020.eca.ed.ac.uk/papers/

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CONNECTIONS: EXPLORING HERITAGE, ARCHITECTURE, CITIES, ART, MEDIA

Call for papers/submissions

Canterbury, UK. University of Kent

June 29 2020 - June 30 2020

Event web site

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Today the digital is ubiquitous across all disciplines connected with life in cities: urban history, architecture, planning, art, design, media, communications, and more. Examples abound.

As the Western world comes to deeper understandings of its heritage in the 21st Century, technology is ever more present in our reading of the past. Data mapping is standard in conservation and social history. Archaeologists use digital tools in geophysics, laser scanning, and compositional analysis. Landscape and architectural visualizations populate museums across the world. In architecture, computational design uses algorithms to replicate biology. Coding produces self-generated architectural form. Information modeling presents planners with interactive design in real time. The city is seen as ‘smart’.

In film and animation, digital models create fictitious places on scales unimagined. Installation artists make space interactive through digitising motion, sound and heat. Projection mapping allows artists to reinterpret the past in-situ. Photographers use digital cameras to document city stories. Marketing, technology and communication mediates the city experience 24/7. In every field, educators are responding.

As the tools we use today merge and blur across disciplines, this conferences asks educators and professionals to consider the following. How can we best manage, direct and utilize the unique potentialities of this interdisciplinary and technological moment? Are we rethinking objects of art and design from the past and future? Are we reconsidering modes of communication, styles of teaching and ways of living? Are we seeing new links between designed objects, visualized spaces and cultural meanings? Are we understanding creative, documentary and media practices in new ways? Are we developing our own knowledge through the technologies, tools or thinking of other disciplines?

Based on this interdisciplinary approach, the conference welcomes educators and professionals in:

Architecture, Urban design, History, Archaeology, Heritage, Art, Design, Technology, Communications, Media, Film, Cultural studies, Pedagogy

Key Dates:

10 Feb 2020: Abstract Submissions (Round One) *   |    20 Feb 2020:  Abstract Feedback

* Round One submissions allow for early review. This is open to all but is particularly useful for international delegates requiring a visa to attend the conference.

Submit: admin@architecturemps.com

For further details, please see the conference website.

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Virtual Traditions: IASTE 2020

THE TRANSIENCE OF TRADITION IN CHANGING GEOGRAPHIES AND GLOBAL LANDSCAPES

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY | NOTTINGHAM, UK

September 03 2020 - September 06 2020

Event web site

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CONFERENCE THEME

Tradition has multiple forms, manifestations, and influences that shape the processes used to produce, transform, preserve, and consume built environments in synch with socio-cultural and economic change. Over the past 30 years, IASTE has helped shape the discourse around the political, cultural, economic, and legal frameworks of tradition. As successive generations hand down building traditions, the endurance of these traditions typically relies on the continuing significance of the built environment to the everyday life of communities, societies, and nations. Yet contemporary societies are increasingly confronted with new forms of communication that are mobile, digital and remote, and hence the very notion of tradition is undergoing a rhetorical transition according to the new global economy and boundary-less conditions of citizenship that are influencing, mobilizing, and manipulating built environments.

With the predominance of mobile communication, social media, and online interaction, the terms “virtual” and “tradition” are no longer at opposite ends of cultural discourse, as they seemed to be a decade ago. Virtual space is developing socio-cultural norms that dictate everyday life, while built environments adapt to virtual events, spaces, and gatherings. IASTE 2020 Nottingham will explore how the mutual influences between the virtual and the traditional reconfigure new structures of communities, societies, and cities — extending and connecting built spaces. In an era defined by social media and online interaction, new agents manipulate traditions, values, myths, borders, and even the legitimacy of the built environment in virtual space. Scientific innovation, data-mining, algorithms, and spatial and digital modeling have thus led to new methods of interpretation and mechanisms of decision-making that force a reconsideration of the link between buildings and people, culture and its consumers.

The organizers of IASTE 2020 Nottingham invite participants to revisit the notion, concepts and practices of tradition at a time when virtual and mobile interaction is increasingly dictating the terms of everyday life, at home, at work, and in the public sphere. Participants will investigate the intellectual dialogue and reciprocal influences at the intersection of physical and virtual landscapes, and reflect on how new methodologies, practices, policies, information technologies, and even the parallel presence of virtual space and cloud communications inform the meaning of tradition in the built environment. By examining alternative futures of tradition, the conference organizers anticipate a progressive inquiry and dialogue regarding the epistemological and philosophical basis of tradition. As in past IASTE conferences, we invite scholars, professionals, and practitioners from architecture, architectural history, urban design, art history, anthropology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, political science, urban studies, conservation, design, digital technologies, and related disciplines to submit papers that address one of the following tracks.

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Housing and the City

!7th Annual International AHRA Conference

University of Nottingham

November 19 2020 - November 21 2020

Event web site

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In the early twentieth century, a desire to master the workings of the city linked it explicitly to the provision of housing. The processes of ‘the urban’ became an ‘ism’, the multiplication of houses became housing. In the twenty-first century, we are, it seems, witnessing the rise of new modes of urban domesticity – of ‘co-living’ for young urban professionals, of ‘co-housing’ of various kinds, of ‘live-work’ units and of a kind of domesticated working. Sometimes, these trends are born of economic necessity; sometimes, they are driven by aspirations of inclusion, solidarity and sharing. In either case, they are promoted as desirable styles of life, experiments in housing and working that are linked to the promise of a new kind of collectivity, a new kind of city. Our concern is to investigate the link between housing and urbanism, if not to disentangle it, at least to interrogate it, in order to ask what these new forms of living and working might mean for the city and its future.

This conference aims to investigate the historical and theoretical genealogy of the following question: what does it mean to be at home in the city in the twenty-first century, in an age of evolving social and work patterns, increased geographical mobility and climate concern?

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines such as architecture, urbanism, sociology, philosophy, geography, anthropology, as well as written and visual contributions from the arts, such as photography or film to explore this question.

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