Upcoming Events

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The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza

Interstices Under Construction symposium: Call for Papers

Auckland University of Technology and University of Auckland, New Zealand

May 26 2017 - May 28 2017

Event web site

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We invite scholarly submissions on the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677), for a special issue of Interstices journal and the annual Interstices symposium to be held in Auckland, New Zealand, 26-28 May 2017. The intent is to further consolidate the recent revival of interest in Spinoza’s thought, and to reaffirm his status as an enormously powerful thinker of contemporary relevance.  Papers on any aspect of Spinoza studies are thus welcomed. But the more specific aim of the symposium and journal issue is twofold: firstly, to extend the burgeoning scholarship on Spinoza into the domains of study parsed by Interstices, namely arts and architecture, and secondly, to situate Spinoza’s philosophy within the particular locus of New Zealand, Australasia, the South Pacific, and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Each of these aspects will be tackled in separate sessions or separate days of the symposium.
            With regard to the first aim, we welcome submissions that put Spinoza’s philosophy in productive proximity with a particular artform or an individual work of art, whether literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, dance, performance, etc. — or that have an especial focus on any of the numerous artistic and literary figures who are known to have read Spinoza appreciatively and in whose works Spinozist shadings might be discerned (Goethe, Coleridge, George Eliot, Thomas Hirschhorn, etc.). Contributors might like to think of this event and journal issue as extending, in the direction of arts and architecture, the very fine work done by the anthology Spinoza Beyond Philosophy (2012, ed. Beth Lord).
Since Interstices’s particular interest is in architectural studies, we would be keen to see contributions that consider Spinoza as helpful for thinking any of the design and spatial disciplines (architecture, urban design, landscape, geography, interior design, and so on). Contributors might also choose to take ‘architecture’ in the sense of ‘structure’, in which case not only would built environments and tectonics be the subject of analysis, but also the very structure of Spinoza’s texts, the extraordinary way in which his texts are wrought (the famous geometric architecture of the Ethics, for example).
We also invite submissions that don’t necessarily fall under any of the artistic disciplines listed above, and that interpret “arts” in the broadest possible sense. Spinoza’s philosophy predates the modern idea of a differentiated domain of the arts, and so the Latin word that Spinoza uses — ars — has the older and broader sense of skill or craft or ability or proficiency.[1] We thus welcome submissions that are about ‘arts’ in this more general sense — for example, about what Spinoza teaches us about the arts of living (ars vivendi) or the arts of constructing a liberal polity (ars politica, government, statecraft).
With regard to the second aim, we invite submissions on any aspects of Spinoza studies that have a connection to New Zealand, Australia, the South Pacific, or Asia-Pacific and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Such papers might, for example, examine the historical reception and interpretation of Spinoza in New Zealand, Australia, the Oceanic “sea of islands”, or any proximate sister region.[2] The idea is to give geographic concreteness and local specificity to the interpretation of Spinoza — to see how Spinoza might be or has been read in New Zealand and the Pacific, and inversely to see how our ways of thinking about New Zealand and the Pacific might be productively inflected by reading Spinoza.

[1] See Moira Gatens, “Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist”, European Journal of Philosophy 23, no. 1 (2015), p. 3.
[2] The reference is to Epeli Hau’ofa’s “Our Sea of Islands”, The Contemporary Pacific 6, no. 1 (1994), 147–161.

 

Abstracts of 300 words, along with a short biographical statement of 100 words, to be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), by midnight nzst, 30th January 2017. For purposes of peer review, the abstract should be sent in a separate self-contained file with no identifying information in it. Please send Microsoft Word files only (doc or docx). Abstracts will be vetted through a process of blind peer review.
Selected papers from the symposium will be invited for revision, peer review, and publication in the subsequent issue of Interstices. If you are unable to attend the symposium in New Zealand, but wish to submit a paper for the journal issue, please send the full and completed paper to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 31st May 2017.
Further inquiries can be directed to the convenor Eu Jin Chua, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), Farzaneh Haghighi, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or to Susan Hedges, the Coordinating Editor of Interstices, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

A fuller Call for Papers / Discussion Document is attached as a PDF file, or available online at http://www.interstices.ac.nz/news-events/

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SAHGB Prizes and Events in Architectural History

May 31 2017 - May 31 2017

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The Society of Architectural Historians Great Britain (SAHGB) is still accepting submissions for two of its growing suite of internationally-renowned prizes. These prizes and awards are the most prestigious in the country for the discipline of architectural history. They are open to all historians of the built environment, and you do not need to be a member to participate. Nominations are normally accepted from members, but unsolicited nominations will be considered on merit.

We particularly encourage submissions from masters and doctoral students in all relevant disciplines, including but by no means limited to:
History
Geography
Architecture
Art History
On as diverse a range of themes as possible, including:
Histories of design
Histories of planning
Histories of construction
Histories of buildings in use
Histories of interiors and interior design
Histories of practice and professionalism
We are looking for work that it is innovative, ambitious and rigorous in the history of the built environment. Previous winners of our awards and prizes have gone on to have esteemed careers in architectural history and heritage.

Please consider submitting work and encourage students, colleagues and friends to do so too. Further information and methods of submission can be found on our website (http://www.sahgb.org.uk).

James Morris Essay Prize for Colonial and Post-Colonial Architecture
Submission Deadline - 31st May
For who? Graduate Students, Early Career Researchers, Academics, Heritage Professionals, Architects
For what? Unpublished research up to 10,000 words
Prize £400, consideration for publication in Architectural History
The James Morris Essay Prize is named after James Morris (1878-1964), a British-born and -educated architect who worked in South Africa from 1902, including a period spent in the office of Sir Herbert Baker. It was generously endowed by his grandson, Dr Simon Morris. It is awarded to the best essay received on British Colonial and Post-Colonial Architecture. The prize is presented at the Society's annual lecture.
 
Hawksmoor Essay Medal
Submission Deadline - 31st May
For who? Graduate Students, Early Career Researchers, Heritage Professionals
For what? Unpublished research up to 10,000 words
Prize £400, Medal, and consideration for publication in Architectural History
To encourage new architectural historians, the Society's Essay Medal (popularly known as 'the Hawksmoor') is awarded annually to the author of the best essay submitted in competition. Early career and unpublished researchers are particularly encouraged to submit new work for the competition. As a permanent reminder of the winner's achievement, a bronze medal featuring a relief portrait of Nicholas Hawksmoor based on the bust of the architect by John Cheere is awarded and inscribed with the winner's name and date. This is presented at the Society's Annual Lecture.

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2017 Interstices 19 (Under Construction) symposium

Surface – Pattern: a pursuit of material narratives.

The University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

June 02 2017 - June 04 2017

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2017 Interstices 19 (Under Construction) symposium

Surface – Pattern: a pursuit of material narratives.

The University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

 

Keynote Speaker: Associate Professor Spyros Papapetros 

School of Architecture, Princeton University

 

Surface and ornament have been extensively reviewed, admonished, discarded and pursued. More recently there has been a renewed interest in the writing of Aby Warburg and Alois Riegl, while numerous studies have addressed these issues relative to Semper, Adolf Loos, Hermann Muthesius, and Le Corbusier. They have been made prominent by issues of animation (see, for example, Papapetros 2012, Payne 2013, van Eck 2014) and digitation (see for example Spuybroek 2008 and Schumacher 2009).

Incrustations, protuberances, textured expressions, smoothed surfaces, surfaces enlivened as screens, are they ornament or cladding? The 2017 Interstices Under Construction Symposium, “Surface – Pattern” pursues the tension between ornament, adornment, object enlivenment, cladding, surface and pattern, and an exploration into the strange animations inherent in surface-pattern continua.

Thought in one direction, smooth surface tends towards speed and a friction-less gloss; in another, pattern stirs surfaces inciting decelerating, contemplation, and even deviation. Etymologically, ‘surface’ accords with the revealing of an upper or outward layer, but it also points to things that receive a surface through polishing or finishing. Pattern suggests the imposition of a plan or design that ultimately models or leads back to exemplars and the impact of patrons. Conjunctures of surface-patterns thus encompass rich and complex narrative effects.

This call for papers invites considerations, at a range of scales, of surface-pattern complexes like territory and landscapes, built assemblages and ‘cladding’, interior surfaces, décor and furniture, sculpture or objects of the decorative arts.

The symposium is motivated by the renewed fascination with the architectural surface and the expressive effects it mobilises – effects that both eschew and uneasily dabble in the decorative. Material mediation has become a means for experimentation, a way of teasing out smooth geometries, tessellated patterns, iconic figures and textures, which may all also perform technical functions, like joining or harmoniously accommodating incremental and differential movement. If, following Paul Virilio, the built, like the social, is inseparable from a politics of speed (in which surfaces, ways, and conduits at every scale are ‘policed’ in order to arrest impediments to an accelerating commerce of motion and passage), we might wonder what role patterning plays today.

As Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari have argued, periodic repetition is key to encoding a milieu, founding territoriality and place-specificity. However, it is also a rhythmic vehicle running on difference, a metrical, staggered and reversible time of variable intensities, in which beginning and end are confused (Bogue 2003: 28). Performative and plastic arts in the Pacific and elsewhere use repetition not only as aesthetic device but also “to symbolise and effect relations of mana” (Tomlinson & Tengan 2015: 17), both channelling affective force and representing memory and knowledge to those who understand (Clark 2006: 12; Nepia 2013: 133, 197).

Pattern and rhythm run free of and extend beyond planar fixity, implicating faces and surfaces that may change, reverse or combine, they alter perception and architectural space. Surfaces, beyond their seconding within building hierarchies, open onto movement and shifting states (Taylor 2009: 47). Architecture, then, can be rethought in relation to an outside that is not kept out or apart, in terms of surfaces, flatness, dynamism and movement rather than stasis (Grosz 1995: 135). Patterned and patterning, surfaces provide a saturated environment rich in repetition, difference and an atmosphere by which architecture is more than a machinic structure. As the distinctions between structures and ornaments, function, form, façade and decor are reconceptualised, surfaces are no longer decorative elements but entities in themselves. Surface “turns into architecture [as the] surface becomes weighted, deep, differentiated, tartan, alternating, camouflaged, tonal, gradated, textured, branded, serial” (Bruno 2014: 93).

It is with this sense of the spatial effects potentiated by surface-pattern that we invite you to submit abstracts for the forthcoming Interstices Under Construction Symposium.

Please send a 500-word abstract and a short biographical statement of 100 words to Susan Hedges (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) by 28th February 2017. Abstracts will be vetted through blind peer review and, if accepted, published on the Interstices website (http://interstices.ac.nz/news-events/). Notifications will be sent out by March 2017. The symposium will be followed by a call for papers for Issue 19 of Interstices: A Journal of Architecture and Related Arts on the same topic in June 2017.

 

Convenors: Andrew Douglas, Tina Engles—Schwarzpaul, Susan Hedges,

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2017 Interstices Under Construction Symposium: Pattern/Surface

Extended deadline for abstract submissions

The University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

June 02 2017 - June 04 2017

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EXTENDED DEADLINE for submissions for “Interstices Under Construction Symposium: Pattern / Surface - a pursuit of material narratives” Auckland, 2nd - 4th June 2017. 500-word abstracts will now be accepted up to Tuesday 21st March, midnight NZST. Send to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) Abstracts submitted by this date will receive a decision by 15 April. Details about registration (fees, concessions, early bird registration) will be posted on the website by 1st April and registrations open on 15th April.

(Those who have already submitted abstracts, thank you — decisions will be sent out for these in late March.)

Please forward to colleagues, friends, and students.

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Brave Old World: Modernist public space design in London and São Paulo

Free Exhibition

Practice Gallery, Royal Institute of British Architects, 66 Portland Place, London

June 02 2017 - July 07 2017

Brave Old World: Modernist public space design in London and São Paulo looks at public
space design between c.1955 and c.1975, during a crucial period for the development
of two world cities, London and São Paulo. Though located in very different cultures,
the designers of the eight public spaces on show shared a common frame of reference,
whatever their view of it: architectural Modernism.
As a result, the four examples in London and the four in São Paulo are works of
equal ambition and equal invention, and representative of a consensus on the value
of the public realm and the importance of the state in providing and protecting it.
The exhibition focuses on the ideas – political, urban, aesthetic – that drove these public
space designs, and the importance of design in delivering successful – and unsuccessful
– public spaces.
In London:
Economist Plaza
British Library forecourt
South Bank Arts Centre
Elephant & Castle Shopping Centre

In São Paulo:

Centro Empresarial Itaú Conceição

Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP)

Centro Cultural de São Paulo (CCSP)

Vale do Anhangabaú

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Society of Architectural Historians 70th Annual International Conference

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

June 07 2017 - June 11 2017

Event web site

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The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) will hold its 70th Annual International Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, from June 7–11, 2017, marking the first time SAH has met outside North America since 1973. An estimated 600 historians, architects, preservationists, and museum professionals from around the world will convene to present new research on the history of the built environment at the University of Strathclyde’s Technology & Innovation Centre. The conference program will feature paper sessions, keynote talks, roundtables, social receptions, and public events including architecture tours in and around Glasgow and a seminar on heritage and sustainability.

For program details and to register, please visit http://www.sah.org/2017. Early registration is open now through March 14, 2017. Registration for tours and the SAH Glasgow Seminar will open to the public on March 15, 2017.

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