Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

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Space to Learn/Think/Work: The Contested Architectures of Higher Education

CfP Deadline Extended until 31st August 2019

August 31 2019 - August 31 2019

Event web site

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Deprived of welfare state support, Higher education has changed markedly since the mid 1960s, mainly due to its privatisation. The neoliberal university has taken hold in many developed countries so that nowadays the imperatives of Higher Education have moved away from a liberal, openly accessible, broadly based education to one that will “commercialise scientific research, launch entrepreneurial degree programs, establish industry partnerships, and build entrepreneurial cultures and ecosystems”.1 This shift manifests itself in an anti-intellectual criticism of the university (often framed in terms of spatial metaphors of ivory towers, echo chambers, halls of mirrors, cloisters, and silos) as well as in ambitious real-estate developments, opening of overseas campuses, and expansion of property portfolios with new buildings in which one finds an excess of ‘spaces for collaboration’, ‘vibrant meeting points’ and multi-coloured, office-style soft furniture. Because the university has been characterised as being cut off from real-world concerns of the office workplace, many Higher Education institutions now use business strategies to incorporate real-world experience within education.

This issue of Architecture and Culture entitled ‘Space to Learn/Think/Work: The Contested Architectures of Higher Education’ invites submissions that directly address the realities of Higher Education and neoliberalism worldwide, whether from areas that have embraced new, overtly market-driven educational models or from those which have actively resisted change. Can educators

and architects redefine the role of the university in society in the West and the East to avoid The University in Ruins?2 If so, how?

How does the discipline of architecture respond to the changing reconfigurations of learning, which are spatial as much as political and economic? In architectures that overtly serve the needs of the market more than pedagogy, critical theorist Douglas Spencer writes that “lecturers are not provided with private or fixed office space, but required to locate and use available space in open-plan offices on an ad hoc basis. Students are subjected to the same freedoms, having to find for themselves areas in which to study. The negotiation of space is itself an education in creativity, a skill to become practised in. Students are to behave as ‘intelligent nomads’”.3 Where what is prescribed for the university are learning landscapes,4 informal learning environments, marketplaces of exchange, hubs of innovation, incubators of new talent and even virtual platforms for delivery of teaching, there is an urgency to question whether space for thought and criticality has disappeared, and to assert where pedagogy takes place.

As space-saving exercises lead to contestations of ‘the studio’ and other spaces for creative and critical thought, Architecture Schools that abandon the studio, it is claimed, can become more relevant to the workplace by occupying co-working spaces, cultural institutions, or architectural practices, or by undertaking live projects.5 How do these approaches challenge or become complicit with the agendas of real estate and further activity that aligns the university with business and the market? Are academics and students being pushed out into the ‘real world’ through limited studio and teaching spaces, whilst the incubator and business hub take up space in the university?6

Is the discipline of architecture as an exemplary creative practice far too amenable to the imperatives of neoliberal economics, turning both students and academics into innovative, creative, self- motivated, flexible and ultimately exploitable entrepreneurial subjects? And if educators have acquiesced in Higher Education’s managerialism and corporatisation, what are the consequences for the bodies of academics and students?

Alison Mountz et. al. have called for a temporal resistance to the compression of time frames and expectations of high productivity in the university.7 How might we specify spaces for slow scholarship, make room for critical thought, and manifest a spatial resistance to the imperatives of (economically) productive collaborative encounter, engineered serendipity, and nomadic expertise?

This issue of Architecture and Culture invites critical analysis of the neoliberal university and its spatial practices in the here and now. We invite contributions from academics and practitioners in architecture, cultural theory, interiors, and related spatial practices, in philosophy, and other [disciplinary] areas.

Contributions might address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • -  The architectures of education

  • -  The academic-industrial complex

  • -  Spatial practices of resistance

  • -  The incubator (Entrepreneurs in the University)

  • -  The Live Project (Academics in the Real World)

  • -  Studio practice and the competitive workplace

  • -  Academic labour, administration and performance review

  • -  The Managerial University and the Corporation

  • -  Real estate, the university brand and signature campus buildings

  • -  The new University of Excellence and commercially driven market forces

  • -  The University Establishment, class/gender/race and social mobility

  • -  Picket lines and teach-outs

  • -  Academic exile or defection – leaving the Higher Education context.

  • -  The spatial forms of ‘slow scholarship’

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Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain, CfP October 22, 2018, Conference October 10-11, 2019

Masters and Disciples; Women at the Bauhaus; The Other Avant-gardes, the Time of the Bauhaus; New Ways of Living, from the Dwelling to the City; Questions of Pedagogy; Mediation over Technology, Crafts versus Industrialization; Encounters between Art and Architecture; Bauhaus Networks; Historiography, Critique and Controversies

Madrid. ILE, Institución Libre de Enseñanza

October 10 2019 - October 11 2019

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The Association of historians of Architecture and Urban Design (AhAU) invites researchers and scholars to present their contributions to the Conference Bauhaus In and Out: Perspectives from Spain. The conference will have an interdisciplinary character, and it will be opened to those questions and areas of knowledge related to the addressed theme.

The paper proposals will be exclusively individual and their extension will have a minimum of 700 and a maximum of 1000 words. They will need to indicate the selected question, and they will be accompanied by two representative images, a selected bibliography, and a brief CV of the author (maximum extension of two pages).

Rather than a numerous collection of contributions, the aim of the Conference is again to awake a series of engaged debates on the different questions that articulate the proposed theme.

October 22, 2018 DEADLINE TO SUBMIT A PAPER ABSTRACT

October 10-11, 2019 Celebration of the II International Conference AhAU, Madrid

Communication with the general chairs and the submission of proposals and final papers will be made through the following address: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Keynote Speakers: Magdalena Droste, Juan José Lahuerta

General Chairs: Laura Martínez de Guereñu, Carolina B. García Estévez

 

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Les intérieurs aujourd’hui/ Interiors today

Méthodes de production et d’analyse interdisciplinaires/Interdisciplinarymethods of productionand analysis

ENSA-Versailles

October 11 2019 - October 12 2019

Event web site

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Interior spaces have often lent themselves to the experimentations of different professionals (architects, interior designers, decorators, ensembliers, designers, artists, etc). By themselves or in collaboration and in frequent interaction with the client, these creators work at the frontiers of several disciplines: architecture, visual arts, design, decoration, etc. These practices testify certain kinds of permeability that take the form of dialogues, transfers, and contaminations, and that aim to produce effects in terms of spaces, uses, perceptions, and emotions. 

Adopting synergetic, critical, contemporary and experimental perspectives, we will question the notion of interior, specifically its versatility, its ambiguity, and its wealth, with regard to its modalities of production, appropriation and perception: from the scale of the body to that of the metropolis (from the object to the space, from domestic spaces to shared spaces of activity, consumption, or entertainment), measured in terms of ecological challenges (the production environments), modern and contemporary practices and uses (lifestyle, services, transportation, mobility) or with regard to new kinds of spatiality (new spaces of sociability, tools and practices of digital spaces). By going beyond the divisions, categorizations, and traditional oppositions (between the outside and the inside, the private and the public, the individual and the collective, etc.), we will reflect and redefine the interior in its relation to environments, territories, and uses, to perceive its historical and synchronical relevance and to grasp its conceptual operationality for the process of the project. What makes an interior? How is it conceived? How is it read, interpreted? How is it lived and felt?

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Initiations: Practices of Teaching 1st Year Design in Architecture

Call for Papers

Department of Architecture, University of Cyprus, Nicosia

October 23 2019 - October 25 2019

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We are pleased to announce the international conference Initiations: Practices of Teaching 1st Year Design in Architecture, organized by the Department of Architecture of the University of Cyprus. The conference will take place between 23-25 October 2019 at Nicosia, Cyprus. Confirmed keynote speakers are Prof. Alberto Pérez-Gómez(McGill University), Patrick Weber (The Bartlett, UCL) and Anna Heringer (Laufen, Germany).

The conference invites architects, design studio teachers, historians, theorists, or anyone from other discipline involved in first year design studio teaching to present their views on the subject. Contributions can range from accounts of specific pedagogical experiments, briefs, case studies, to more theoretical or historical investigations on architectural education and pedagogy in general. The deadline for abstract submission is Monday 3 June 2019.

Conference proceedings will be published electronically and a selection of extended papers will be included in a book publication on the conference topic after peer review.

For more information and updates on the conference please visit our website http://cyprusconferences.org/tfyd2019/

For any inquiries please contact the organizing committee at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Architecture and Bureaucracy

Entangled Sites of Knowledge Production and Exchange: Call for Papers

October 30 2019 - October 31 2019

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Often experienced by architects as a site of imposition and control, the bureaucracy associated with the production of the built environment can alternatively be seen as one of knowledge exchange. It is and has been a unique forum for the expression and discussion of ideas originating in disparate fields. Principles and concerns particular to architecture, interior design, urban design, engineering, construction sciences and technology, meet and met topical issues in sociology and economy, law and politics, administration, management and government sciences and the ethics of public and private interests. These encounters, involving a wide variety of actors and cultures, significantly contribute to the production of architectural thought and to the materialisation of abstract concepts.

The unpublished record of bureaucracy, including planning applications, funding submission files, design, tender and building papers, central, regional and local government documents and company management papers, has been largely overlooked as a source for the study of architectural thought in the twentieth century. Yet it can illuminate valuable theory-practice relays and provide insight into the diverse intellectual traditions that converge in a culture of architecture more generously and inclusively considered. Reading such records as pieces of a powerful yet little understood form of media for architecture, as proposed by Ben Kafka for cultural history artefacts (The Demon of Writing, 2012), can bring out new dimensions in a wide-scope ontology of architectural production.

This conference intends to test such premises. We welcome papers that use the record of bureaucracy to illuminate the architectural and extra-architectural cultures of stakeholders in the design, regulation, assessment, approval, funding, specification and construction steps of building creation processes throughout the twentieth century. Proposals may focus on specific case studies of buildings, agents or administrations; discuss the nature, origins and specificities of discourses found in built-environment- related bureaucracy; and/or reflect on the methodological challenges in studying architecture and bureaucracy.

Call for Papers (for further details of strands/approaches, please see flier/website)

Abstracts of max. 500 words accompanied by a one-page CV are to be submitted via e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 30 April 2019.

Selected speakers will be notified by 31 May 2019.

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Architecture & Collective Life

16th Annual AHRA International Conference

University of Dundee

November 21 2019 - November 23 2019

Event web site

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What does society look like?

If you want to know what society looks like, look at our cities: look at their distribution of spaces and artefacts; look at their scales, intensities, and densities. Look at how they curate events. Architecture & Collective Life will explore the relations that bind people and environments into settlements, and settlements into civilisations. In The Politics Aristotle argued that the city has a particular form because public life has a particular form. Vitruvius’ account of the primitive hut is as much about the emergence of society as it is about the emergence of architecture. Today, new media and digital technologies are creating new forms of association, which are shifting the locus of political life; and it is now no longer possible for Hannah Arendt, reading Aristotle, to so neatly equate the city with politics. This discourse is urgent. The post-war public realm is under pressure from market-led ideologies and development practices. The damage we are doing to the environment, and the way identity politics has shifted the tenor of public debate, raise questions from seemingly opposite corners about our capacities to organise for thoughtful collective action.

We are interested in how the individual and the collective are constructed and reproduced in public and private life, at different scales, in different disciplines, with the intention of keeping these categories as open as possible to different areas of thought and action. We would like to know how collectives are constructed around labour, power, authority, authorship, events, times, places, non-places, otherness, ecology, technology, media, the zeitgeist, ideologies, consciousness, origins, histories, beauty, housing, and campfires. As a vehicle of the AHRA, we are particularly keen to explore the contributions of architecture to this process. We also are interested in the roles of research, the humanities, and the University – the institution with a social mandate for intellectual culture and education – in building forms of collective intelligence and collective life.

Architecture & Collective Life will constitute an inclusive and critical discourse with a broad interdisciplinary base in the liberal arts and sciences, with a programme of debates and round table discussions and exhibitions, public lectures, film screenings, and paper sessions. We invite theorists, practitioners, and community activists within and outwith academe, in charities, public agencies and institutions, to present proposals for individual papers and paper sessions. We intend to use this conference as a forum for thinking out loud and in public, with the openness, commitment, and criticality that we expect to find in the University.

The AHRA is now accepting abstracts for its 16thannual conference in Dundee on 21-23 November 2019. We encourage submissions from architects, urbanists, planners, community activists, and policymakers, alongside scholars and practitioners from related fields including: philosophy, history, law, politics, economics, psychology, geography, sociology, and medicine. We welcome independent scholars, interested individuals and students. Over the course of the three day conference there will be five keynote lectures, 30 paper sessions and a number of round table discussions.

More information here: https://ahra2019.com/call-for-papers/

 

Contact Lorens Holm and Penny Lewis at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Keynote speakers, confirmed:

Jodi Dean, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Reinier De Graaf, OMA and Cambridge University
Indris Kagis McEwan, Concordia University, Montreal
Joan Ockman, University of Pennsylvania School of Design
Martino Tattara, Dogma and Catholic University Leuven

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