Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

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AHRA Annual PhD Student Symposium

The University of Manchester

April 24 2019 - April 25 2019

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The AHRA Research Student Symposium 2019 takes as its starting point a broad and prolonged transition occurring in architectural research during the past decade. New and interdisciplinary approaches emerge as a result of our world’s socio-political and techno-ecological transformations towards relational, processual “architectural research.” These changes move away from descriptions and interpretations of a static formal “Architecture” focused on particular buildings and architects.

Following this interdisciplinary and processual turn, the 2019 AHRA PhD student symposium aims to bring together architectural researchers who work towards re-writing and re-drawing traditional notions of essence, fixity, boundedness, and flatness. We are interested in architectural research that:

  • follows people, buildings, infrastructures, non-humans, landscapes, and materials.
  • traces the ecological, the technical, the spatial, the temporal, the political, the economic, and the historical.
  • stimulates thinking and action across scales, forms, and collectives.

We invite contributions from a variety of fields with an aim to discuss and explore adequate ways of narrating and re-presenting the extended spectrum of architectural operations.

Submissions of proposals for academic papers and methods workshops are welcome from all backgrounds and nationalities. Applicants must be registered as current PhD students at the time of application. Please see details on the “Call for Papers” tab of the event website.

Deadline for submissions 28th January 2019.

The contact email is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) (Please note this is email account is administered by a number of people on the symposium organising committee, and replies might take a few days.)

Applications to participate in the Methods Workshops will be announced later. The event will be free to attend.

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Mobs and Microbes: Market Halls, Civic Order and Public Health

72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians: Call for Papers

Providence, Rhode Island, USA

April 24 2019 - April 29 2019

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2019 marks fifty years since the central market of Paris was uprooted from Les Halles and transferred to Rungis in the city’s outskirts. By 1971, nearly all of Victor Baltard’s iconic pavilions were demolished. Les Halles, as well as many comparable covered market halls across Europe, North America, and beyond, became flashpoints of protest between urban reformers who argued for functionalism and architectural preservationists who championed the adaptation of historical structures. Despite their polarities, both sides presented the market buildings as artefacts of the Industrial Revolution. In particular, the portrayal of glass and iron markets as antiquated relics made it challenging to fathom how these places originally elicited awe and wonder at the time of their construction. Congestion, sanitation, and radical changes in the distribution of food supplies are typically cited as reasons for the demise of covered market buildings. Ironically, however, most of the halls were originally conceived to answer these very same factors. As such, this session will situate markets at the intersection of civic order and public health, focusing in particular on how these structures stood in reciprocity with changes in the conception of the public realm. Central to this discussion are two themes: innovations in design, which embodied authority or control; and advancements in sanitation and hygiene, such as the modernization of water systems and the inception of epidemiological and bacteriological research.

We invite proposals across a broad geographical area that investigate how covered market halls were radical interventions that mediated socio-political conflict and disorder. Papers exploring medical and environmental humanities perspectives are also welcome, and these might question how infrastructure, services, technologies, and materials helped facilitate improvements in urban health and food safety. Papers that consider how surviving covered markets contribute to debates surrounding sustainability and neighborhood regeneration are also of interest.

The 72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians will take place on April 24-28, 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island. Applicants must submit a 300-word abstract and CV through the online portal of the Society of Architectural Historians ( http://www.sah.org/2019 ). Further details of the submission guidelines are available at www.sah.org. Please do not send materials directly to the panel co-chairs. Submission of proposals to the SAH online portal closes at 11:59 on June 5, 2018 (Central Daylight Time).

Session Chairs: Samantha Martin-McAuliffe, University College Dublin, and Leila Marie Farah, Ryerson University

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13th International Design and Design History Symposium “Design and Authority”

Izmir, Turkey

May 02 2019 - May 04 2019

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13th International Design and Design History Symposium

"Design and Authority"

Dates: May 2-4, 2019

Call for Papers: January 25, 2019

Location: Izmir, Turkey

email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

website: http://www.4t.org.tr/

 

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11th Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Symposium

"Continuity in/of Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality"

Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

May 16 2019 - May 19 2019

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The Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality Forum (ACSF) announces its 2019 Symposium (ACSF 11) to take place in Taliesin West (Scottsdale, Arizona), an internationally recognized icon and destination for most architects, landscape architects, and designers.  Illuminated by the visionary and mystical figure of Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin West offers participants the perfect context where to meditate, sense, discuss, and even plan how to best harness the continuous interactions between nature, design, and spirituality. It also permits attendees to consider the little-addressed yet important legacy of FLW’s spiritual sensibility, belief, and practices vis-à-vis his work (60 years after his passing) in light of the huge challenges facing the world today. 

The symposium dates are May 16-19, 2019. As in previous symposia, ACSF 11 will be structured around a main topic (in this case "Continuity in/of Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality") but also open to ideas, works, and proposals relevant to the Forum's areas of interest.  We invite all individuals interested in participating in this event to submit proposals of 500 to 1,000 words for either the SYMPOSIUM TOPIC or an OPEN SESSION. Proposals may be submitted in one of three categories: paper, practice/research project, and workshop. The deadline is January 21st, 2019.

For more information, contact ACSF 11 co-chair Julio Bermudez at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 

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Building-Object/Design-Architecture: Exploring Interconnections

A conference jointly supported by the Design History Society, the European Architectural History Network, and the Architecture Space and Society Centre (Birkbeck)

Clore Business School (Birkbeck), London

June 06 2019 - June 08 2019

“I think that cars today are almost the exact equivalent of the great Gothic cathedrals: I mean the supreme creation of an era, conceived with passion by unknown artists, and consumed in image if not in usage by a whole population which appropriates them as a purely magical object.” Roland Barthes, 1957

This two-day conference will explore old, new and future interconnections between Design History and Architectural History. It will address the disciplines’ shared historiography, theory, forms of analysis and objects of critical enquiry, and draw attention to how recent developments in the one can have significant implications for the other. It will attend to areas of difference, in order, ultimately to identify new areas for discussion and set future agendas for research between the disciplines.

We invite proposals for individual papers (of 20 minutes length) in any area that productively engages with the aims of the conference and we would especially like to see papers in the following areas:

 

Historiographic entanglements and coincidences

Everyday environments

Ornament from object to building (and back)

Use/maintenance/dereliction

Objects on exhibition/buildings on exhibition

Micro to macro - macro to micro

Representations/representing

Tactility-virtuality

Interiors/Exteriors

 

 

Deadline for Abstracts – 15 November 2018

Abstracts (maximum 500 words). Papers will not be accepted that have already been accepted for another conference, or that have been published or accepted for publication.

 

Abstracts, with a two page CV, should be sent to –  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Building-Object/Design-Architecture – Exploring Interconnections

Clore Management Centre, 27 Torrington Square, London

June 06 2019 - June 08 2019

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This two-day conference will explore old, new and future interconnections between Design History and Architectural History. It addresses the disciplines’ shared objects, historiography, and theory.

The distinction between design history and architectural history is to some extent an artificial one, given the many ties between designed objects and designed spaces as well as between those who design and make the former and those who design and make the latter, but it follows certain disciplinary and professional developments. These are manifest, for instance, in the separate existence of the Design History Society and the European Architectural History Network, two of the sponsors of this conference.

In one art historical tradition – Kunstwissenschaft, or the critical history of art – the objects of design and architecture (as well as fine art objects) which are now usually separated out as requiring specialist study, were considered of equal significance and requiring equal attention. It was this tradition that provided some of the founding figures for both present-day design history and present-day architectural history – Semper, Riegl, Panofsky, Pevsner, among them. (Even later figures like Reyner Banham might be understood as displaced products of this tradition). And the separation of expertise was also largely alien to the connoisseurial and antiquarian traditions.

The turning away from these traditions of interdisciplinarity can be understood as an inevitable effect of emergent disciplinary identities as much as of worked-out theories. But there are untapped residues as well as new developments that may prove fertile ground for collaboration.

What are we learning about materialities, about globalising perspectives, or about new forms of writing, for instance, that may benefit both disciplines? Furthermore, does the very separation of design and architectural history distort or falsely dichotomise their objects? Can their co-existence be worked into current rubrics for interdisciplinarity, or do older co-disciplines disqualify themselves?

A conference supported by the Design History Society, the European Architectural History Network, and the Architecture Space and Society Centre (Birkbeck).

Keynote speakers – Ben Highmore, Doris Behrens-Abouseif, Adrian Forty.

  • Contact details for further information

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