Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

Post your own event

Generosity

An international conference at the Welsh School of Architecture,Cardiff, UK

Cardiff, Wales, UK

June 28 2018 - June 29 2018

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

Generosity is associated with the act of giving or sharing more than is necessary, with bravery, with notions of a benefactor and a recipient, and with a quality of being plentiful or expansive. From a stance of celebrating and questioning architecture's potential for generosity, this call for papers invites academics and creative practitioners to explore ways in which architecture aspires to, or may be expected to, give more than is necessary. This could be considered within the current economic context of austerity or within the broader historic context of a discipline often working in frameworks focused on cost and quantitative measurement. Reflections are welcomed which critically examine themes of Generosity as related to architecture and related fields, whether they be from a conceptual or theoretical position, embedded in everyday processes and expectations of practice, or from considerations of procurement, regulation, and policy.

Permalink to this event page

From Building to Continent: How Architecture makes Territories

Kent School of Architecture (UK)

June 28 2018 - June 29 2018

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

Cultural landscape refers to landscapes shaped by humans through habitation, cultivation, exploitation and stewardship, and has influenced thinking in other fields, such as architecture. Generally, architecture has been subsumed within cultural landscape itself as a comprehensive spatial continuum. Yet standard architectural histories often analyse buildings as isolated objects, sometimes within the immediate context, but typically with minimal acknowledgement of wider spatial ramifications. However, buildings may become spatial generators, not only in the immediate vicinity, but also at larger geographic scales. ‘Buildings’ in this case include architectural works in the traditional sense, as well as roads, bridges, dams, industrial works, military installations, etc. Such structures have been grouped collectively to represent territories at varying scales.

 

Permalink to this event page

2018 Interstices Under Construction Symposium CFP

2018 Interstices Under Construction Symposium: Presence

University of Auckland, Auckland, in collaboration with Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

July 12 2018 - July 14 2018

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

We invite you to submit an abstract for the forthcoming Interstices ‘Under Construction Symposium’, inspired by the spark of presence and its spatial effects. Following the symposium, papers will be sought for Interstices issue. 20 on this same theme. For publishing options and the required formatting, please refer to the Guidelines for Submissions on the Interstices website. 

The symposium will be run in conjunction with a colloquium led by Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Harold Marshall and other principal speakers to be announced.

Abstracts of 300 words may be forwarded to Sue Hedges up to 28 February 2018:.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dates: Keynote lecture on the evening of Thursday 12 July 2018 followed by full days on 13 and 14 July

Venue: University of Auckland, Symonds Street, Auckland, in collaboration with Auckland University of Technology

Conference organisers:

Ross Jenner, Andrew Barrie, Julia Gatley, University of Auckland

Andrew Douglas, Sue Hedges, Auckland University of Technology

Permalink to this event page

Call for Papers: Building as Service: People, Politics and Governance

ISPA International Society for the Philosophy of Architecture 4th International Conference

Colorado Springs, USA

July 25 2018 - July 25 2018

Event web site

web site thumbnail available soon

The fact that buildings are so strongly associated with various power holding empires, nation-states and other forms of civilization is widely recognized in the study of both the history of people and their buildings. From Pericles’s Acropolis to Niemeyer’s Brasilia, architecture has long been associated with political figures and institutions. Buildings such as the British Parliament, the Russian Kremlin, and the U.S. Capitol stand out not just as iconic architecture, but also as representative of the politics, institutions, and culture of the nation. The connection between architecture and politics is evident, yet precisely how are political concepts captured in the form and function of buildings?

A strong link between the buildings and the political philosophies of a nation-state or other ruling body is the building’s use. We know that buildings serve the establishment and maintenance of a governing body, but do they contribute to maintaining a particular ideological belief system? Or is the connection more explicit, such as a wall, literally dividing two peoples whose belief system itself remains autonomous from association with buildings?

Taking the stance that buildings hold both deterministic effect and autonomous disassociation, how do architects and politicians act? Considering the contemporary context, to what extent should architects design public structures intended to capture the social and political ethos of the people? Do architects have an obligation to address the socio-political in their work? Is this kind of moral obligation misplaced? Is it rather that the work of architects is already tacitly, inextricably part of the political process? And to what extent?

On the other hand, do rulers utilize building to achieve their political goals and ideals? Is building fundamental to realizing ideological goals or a mere part of the process? Are there styles or typologies particularly conducive to establishing and maintaining power? Is the association of contemporary democracy with classical Greek and Roman architecture appropriate or warranted? And is the style’s reverence intrinsic or learned? Could the Romanesque not equally as well serve the same purpose?

Assuming that buildings are already intrinsically enmeshed within the governing body’s authority, can a single building work against that same authority? Can a building undermine an entire regime? Some may argue that the Berlin Wall marked the end of the Communist rule over Eastern Germany, but how much weight can a building hold on the integrity of a governing body? How effective, for instance, are efforts to rebuild Iraq? Considering that American contractors are building structures programmatically and aesthetically at odds with the resident socio-political climate, the very act of building in Iraq may be taken as an offense to the Iraqi nation-state. Although not all instances of international exchange are as contentious as this one, can architecture be incompatible with particular political concepts or systems?

Permalink to this event page

Urbanism @ BORDERS

Interdisciplinary Global Workshop for Research Network (Call for Papers or Documentary Films)

Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

September 05 2018 - September 08 2018

  1. Border research emphases on the discourse analysis on critical issues and connotation of separation - demarcation – segregation and conflicts and translated and theorizing these issues in various patterns of urbanism. Borders determine the degree of how regions are positioned in the global maps with the condition with which regions are valued, categorised and marked by its capacity to create individual geographical identities and unique settlement patterns. Borders define socially and economically incompatible systems that influence the nature of mobility of goods, human traffic, and economic transactions that suggest temporal, subdued, blurring socio-cultural entities defined by urban orders. Borders create these blurring urban orders along its boundaries defined by lack of cohesiveness with either sides of a border.

Borders are more than geographically defined separations, but accounts of metamorphoses and metaphors that two neighbouring states are defined by the economy, politics, culture, and religion – manifested by its typological entities.

Permalink to this event page

A World of Architectural History

Bartlett School of Architecture, Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London, UK

November 02 2018 - November 04 2018

The conference’s aim is to critique and celebrate the latest advances within architectural history globally over the last few decades, by focusing upon the word ‘global’ in two senses: 

  • Geographically, referring to the increasing inclusion of all parts of the world in more complex and multiple discourses of architectural history;
  • Intellectually, the ongoing expansion of architectural history into other academic subjects, plus the reception of ideas/themes from those subjects.

The conference will take place around the same time as the publication of Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture (Bloomsbury Press), although as a separate event. Recognition will be given to a more inclusive approach to architectural history that seeks to incorporate the histories of all countries/regions, and to the significant contributions now being made through interdisciplinary links with other subjects. As such, the conference will represent the forefront of the field internationally and also discuss where architectural history ought to head in future. Conference presenters will include those from the wide range of subject areas within the Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment and leading figures in architectural history across the world. Papers will consist of a balance of those by invited speakers and those selected via an open call.

Permalink to this event page

Page 1 of 2 pages  1 2 >