Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

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Virtual Traditions: IASTE 2020

THE TRANSIENCE OF TRADITION IN CHANGING GEOGRAPHIES AND GLOBAL LANDSCAPES

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY | NOTTINGHAM, UK

September 03 2020 - September 06 2020

Event web site

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CONFERENCE THEME

Tradition has multiple forms, manifestations, and influences that shape the processes used to produce, transform, preserve, and consume built environments in synch with socio-cultural and economic change. Over the past 30 years, IASTE has helped shape the discourse around the political, cultural, economic, and legal frameworks of tradition. As successive generations hand down building traditions, the endurance of these traditions typically relies on the continuing significance of the built environment to the everyday life of communities, societies, and nations. Yet contemporary societies are increasingly confronted with new forms of communication that are mobile, digital and remote, and hence the very notion of tradition is undergoing a rhetorical transition according to the new global economy and boundary-less conditions of citizenship that are influencing, mobilizing, and manipulating built environments.

With the predominance of mobile communication, social media, and online interaction, the terms “virtual” and “tradition” are no longer at opposite ends of cultural discourse, as they seemed to be a decade ago. Virtual space is developing socio-cultural norms that dictate everyday life, while built environments adapt to virtual events, spaces, and gatherings. IASTE 2020 Nottingham will explore how the mutual influences between the virtual and the traditional reconfigure new structures of communities, societies, and cities — extending and connecting built spaces. In an era defined by social media and online interaction, new agents manipulate traditions, values, myths, borders, and even the legitimacy of the built environment in virtual space. Scientific innovation, data-mining, algorithms, and spatial and digital modeling have thus led to new methods of interpretation and mechanisms of decision-making that force a reconsideration of the link between buildings and people, culture and its consumers.

The organizers of IASTE 2020 Nottingham invite participants to revisit the notion, concepts and practices of tradition at a time when virtual and mobile interaction is increasingly dictating the terms of everyday life, at home, at work, and in the public sphere. Participants will investigate the intellectual dialogue and reciprocal influences at the intersection of physical and virtual landscapes, and reflect on how new methodologies, practices, policies, information technologies, and even the parallel presence of virtual space and cloud communications inform the meaning of tradition in the built environment. By examining alternative futures of tradition, the conference organizers anticipate a progressive inquiry and dialogue regarding the epistemological and philosophical basis of tradition. As in past IASTE conferences, we invite scholars, professionals, and practitioners from architecture, architectural history, urban design, art history, anthropology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, political science, urban studies, conservation, design, digital technologies, and related disciplines to submit papers that address one of the following tracks.

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Call for Expressions of Interest to host the AHRA International Conference 2022 / 2023.

September 10 2020 - September 10 2020

The Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) welcomes expressions of interest from schools of architecture to host the annual AHRA International Conference. In developing your proposal, we would be grateful if you could address the following concerns. Please see linked PDF for further details and information.

  1. Name of your institution and contact person;

  2. Which year you’d like to host and specific dates in late November;

  3. Intended theme of the conference, including research questions, themes for

    interrogation and academic context;

  4. List specific coverage of disciplines – who might engage with your conference?

  5. List what types of “papers” you would like to receive including any non-traditional forms

    of conference activity, such as workshops, performance, etc.;

  6. Proposed invited speakers and how they will contribute to the conference theme;

  7. Please keep in mind recent themes of other AHRA International Conferences in order

    to avoid repeating recent themes including keynote speaker repetition (listed below).

  8. Conference committee, both internal and external (possible reviewers, etc);

  9. Confirmation of logistical support – IT, etc.;

  10. Financial proposal including support from your institution and probable fees to delegates

  11. Conference venue(s)

Please return your Expression of Interest to the Chair of the AHRA Steering Group, Dr Tilo Amhoff, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 10. September 2020.

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Call for Expressions of Interest to host the AHRA PhD Student Symposium 2022 / 2023.

September 10 2020 - September 10 2020

The Architectural Humanities Research Association (AHRA) welcomes expressions of interest from schools of architecture to host the annual AHRA PhD Student Symposium. In developing your proposal, we would be grateful if you could address the following concerns. Please see linked PDF for further details (page 2-)

  1. Name of your institution and contact person;

  2. Which year you’d like to host and your proposed dates in late April of that year;

  3. Name of an invited speaker (ideally the invited speaker should speak about Research

    Practice or Methods) and how this speech will help forward the intentions of the

    symposium;

  4. Proposed venue(s);

  5. Confirmation of IT support on the day, and

  6. Confirmation that the symposium will be free of charge to delegates.

Please return your Expression of Interest to the Chair of the AHRA Steering Group, Dr Tilo Amhoff, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by 10. September 2020.

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Architectures of Hiding

Crafting Concealment | Omission | Censorship | Erasure | Silence

Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

September 25 2020 - September 26 2020

Event web site

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Architectural creation, its representation, interpretation, and associated activities more often than not are seen as processes of revelation. However, one can argue that architecture hides as much as it reveals. The Purloined Letter, a detective story written by Edgar Allen Poe, describes the chase to look for a stolen letter with confidential information. The story revolves around the search for a letter hidden by being left out in the open. Allen Poe highlights a complicated relationship between visibility, revelation, clarity and its complementary hiding, concealing, camouflaging. 

In the realm of architecture, are there examples of ‘hiding’ in teaching, representing, knowing, writing and building architecture? If so, how do those manifest themselves?
How is hiding practiced under other terms that obscure the practice of concealment? What does it result in? What sources does it emerge from and who operates it

This call for papers and works encourages the exploration of ideas revolving around the theme of hiding. We invite proposals that examine ‘hiding’ in varied manifestations – camouflage, censorship, omission, curation, dissolution, fragmentation, simulacrum, silence, secrecy... We envision this symposium as an opportunity to question the boundaries of architecture seeking inter-disciplinary contributions.

Call for papers/proposals due by January 15th, 2020. Please see event website for further details

 

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Parliament Buildings

THE ARCHITECTURE OF POWER, ACCOUNTABILITY AND DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE

The Bartlett School of Architecture

November 12 2020 - November 12 2020

Event web site

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‘Parliament Buildings’ is a one-day conference and a book exploring the architecture of power, accountability and democracy in Europe. It will take place virtually on 12 November 2020. 

The conference is being led by Professor Sophia Psarra, The Bartlett School of Architecture, and Dr Claudia Sternberg, UCL European Institute. It is funded by UCL Grand Challenges of Cultural Understanding.

In the face of ongoing political change, confidence in democracy is waning – calling upon us to rethink our political institutions and the buildings in which they are accommodated.

– Professor Sophia Psarra, The Bartlett School of Architecture

Call for papers

The organisers invite contributions from architecture, political science and political theory, history, law, geography and associated disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. The conference seeks to engage parliament buildings in Europe, shifting attention from their monumental expression to the spatial construction of political practices and traditions. 

Issues to be discussed in the conference will include: how parliament buildings in Europe shape concepts of their political selves and of the body politic; how they relate to broader political culture and ideology; how they can shape collective identities, national narratives and the future of Europe; and how performance art could be used to re-imagine political debate in contemporary society. 

The organisers will publish an edited volume based on contributions to the conference. 

Deadline for abstracts: 15 June 2020. 
Send your proposal summary (500 min – 700 max words, including title and references) to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Housing and the City

17th Annual International AHRA Conference

VIRTUAL CONFERENCE, hosted by the University of Nottingham

November 19 2020 - November 21 2020

Event web site

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***CALL FOR PAPERS EXTENDED UNTIL JUNE 30TH***

Given the changes to our lives brought about by the current Covid19 pandemic, we are sending a short additional call for papers for this year’s AHRA International Conference, Housing and the City, as follows:

Housing and the City After the Pandemic

The primary question asked by the original AHRA 2020 conference call was this: what does it mean to be at home in the city in the twenty-first century? As the world continues to fight the rapid spread of Covid19, we might not yet be in a position to substantively rethink this question, let alone to predict a new urban reality of segregation and containment. However, we invite you to reflect and speculate on how the effects of the pandemic will shape our lives, how it challenges our conception of the home and the city, and how it affects the complex relationships between the individual and the collective, the public and the private. We ask how it might affect the dynamism of the urban.

We invite contributions in the form of individual papers or roundtable discussions, as well as submissions in a range of media, for example film, artwork or photography, that reflect and speculate on how the pandemic will shape our urban lives into the future. 

Expressions of interest should take the form of an abstract of 300 words, accompanied by an image if appropriate, to be submitted via the conference website, by 30 June 2020.

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In the early twentieth century, a desire to master the workings of the city linked it explicitly to the provision of housing. The processes of ‘the urban’ became an ‘ism’, the multiplication of houses became housing. In the twenty-first century, we are, it seems, witnessing the rise of new modes of urban domesticity – of ‘co-living’ for young urban professionals, of ‘co-housing’ of various kinds, of ‘live-work’ units and of a kind of domesticated working. Sometimes, these trends are born of economic necessity; sometimes, they are driven by aspirations of inclusion, solidarity and sharing. In either case, they are promoted as desirable styles of life, experiments in housing and working that are linked to the promise of a new kind of collectivity, a new kind of city. Our concern is to investigate the link between housing and urbanism, if not to disentangle it, at least to interrogate it, in order to ask what these new forms of living and working might mean for the city and its future.

This conference aims to investigate the historical and theoretical genealogy of the following question: what does it mean to be at home in the city in the twenty-first century, in an age of evolving social and work patterns, increased geographical mobility and climate concern?

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines such as architecture, urbanism, sociology, philosophy, geography, anthropology, as well as written and visual contributions from the arts, such as photography or film to explore this question.

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