Upcoming Events

This page provides links and information about forthcoming events including those organised by AHRA.

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Data Publics

Public Plurality in an Era of Data Determinacy

Goldsmiths, University of London & Gasworks, London

January 26 2017 - January 28 2017

Event web site

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International research forum hosted by the Department of Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths, University of London

Thursday, 26 January 2017, 7pm-9pm, Goldsmiths, London
Friday, 27 January 2017, 11am-7pm, Goldsmiths, London
Saturday, 28 January 2017, 12pm-4pm, Gasworks, London

with keynotes by Lev Manovich and Ravi Sundaram,
and contributions by Luciana Parisi, Ignacio Valero, Stephen Graham, Jennifer Gabrys, Matthew Fuller, Paolo Gerbaudo, Dani Admiss, Cecilia Wee, Lise Autogena, Joshua Portway, Simon Yuill, and others.

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AIARG 2017 Conference

Call for Conference Papers

Waterford Institute of Technology

January 27 2017 - January 28 2017

Event web site

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Proposals for conference papers are now sought for the 6th annual AIARG conference to be held in Waterford on 27- 28 January 2017. Paper must be submitted under the following thematic sessions.

  • Architectural Education in the Age of Globalization: when East meets West.
  • Centenary Celebration of William H. Whyte, Sage of the City (1917-1999).
  • Concealed or Exposed? Ireland and Concrete.
  • Critical Spatial Practice and Sensibility Formation.
  • Design versus Conservation and the Value of Time. What is the meaning of place?
  • Domesticity at the Crossroads: Irish Housing Design 1955-1980.
  • Evaluating Landscapes.
  • Interim Review- on Architectural Education 2.
  • Intertidal Infrastructural.
  • Reproduction: Architectural Education. Ideology and Capitalist Relations of Production.
  • Streets on the ground: Rediscovering planned and unplanned city streets.
  • The Minor Woods of Ireland.
  • “There are 60 degrees, so why stick to one?” (Zaha Hadid, Feb 2003), Considering the complete life and legacy of Zaha Hadid.
  • Transculturation. Merging and Converging of Architectural Idioms, Energies and Ideals.

Please forward your abstract by email (300 words maximum) to session chair by 24 October. Full papers (2,000-2,500 words) expected in December. Please include with your abstract a 100 word biography and contact details. 

For more information or queries visit www.aiarg2017conference.com or email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Theory’s History 196X-199X

Challenges in the historiography of architectural knowledge

Brussels

February 09 2017 - February 10 2017

Event web site

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Theory’s history, 196X – 199X
Challenges in the historiography of architectural knowledge

KU Leuven, Belgium

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN BRUSSELS
9th-10th of February, 2017.
Submission deadline: 15th of June, 2016

 

In recent international literature addressing the history of 20th century architectural theory, the year 1968 is indicated as a decisive moment, giving rise to a ‘new’ architectural theory. From that moment onwards, emphasis was no longer placed on the aesthetics of architecture, but on its critical potential. Yet, according to some scholars, this intensification of theory was short-lived. A presence of coexisting and even contradictory paradigms derived from very different epistemic domains (anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, social sciences, etc.) led to a setback of theory, resulting in an end-of-theory atmosphere in the 1990s.     
It is not a coincidence that the so called death of architectural theory concurred with the upsurge of anthologies on architectural theory that collect and classify referential texts. Instead of burying theory, these anthologies had an additional effect, namely to institutionalise it. In other words, they offered both closure to a past period and also defined the locus of a next period of theorisation, invoking a ‘historical turn’. At the same time architectural discourses, and especially architectural historiography, were engaging with new theoretical fields such as gender studies or postcolonial studies, giving rise to a continued production of theoretically informed books and articles.

The goal of this conference is to discuss the methodological challenges that come along with this historical gaze towards theory, by focusing on the concrete processes in which knowledge is involved. By screening the unspoken rules of engagement that the accounts of post-war architectural theory have agreed to and distributed, we want to point at dominant assumptions, biases and absences. While anthologies inevitably narrate history with rough meshes, we believe it is time to search for those versions of theory formation that have slipped through these nets of historiography, in order to question the nature of theory and the challenges it poses to historians. How do you do historical research on something as intangible as theory, or in a broadened sense, the knowledge of architecture?

 

Practical information

Please visit our website for up to date information and for the full CFP: architecture.kuleuven.be/theoryshistory

This two-day conference will be held in Brussels on Thursday and Friday 9th - 10th February 2017. The conference aims to bring together both young and established scholars from every discipline that is able to engage with the topics outlined above. Confirmed keynotes are Joan Ockman, Ákos Moravánszky and Ɓukasz Stanek.

We’re happy to receive abstracts of up to 300 words until the 15th of June, 2016. Information on how to submit is provided on our website. Abstracts will be anonymously reviewed by an international scientific committee. Authors will be notified of acceptance on the 15th of July 2016. In order to provide a solid conference, we expect full papers one month in advance of the conference, i.e. 1st of January, 2017.

Please note that there will be a conference fee for participants of maximum €150 and a reduced price for students.

For any other questions, please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Building Material: Practice

The 21st edition of Building Material seeks papers on the theme of practice in architecture

February 10 2017 - February 10 2017

Practice can be defined as a process of habitual iteration. The idea of the architect as ‘practitioner’ therefore captures aspects of the design of buildings not quite encapsulated in the notion of the architect as ‘professional’. Yet to practise architecture may or may not necessarily mean the production of buildings or even involve design. Many architects find other ways to engage with and alter the built environment. Amongst other factors, a cyclical economic climate often compels architects to be survivalist, innovative, flexible and robust in the ways that architecture is pursued, realised, paid for, practised. Simultaneously, there are other more positive reasons why practice has evolved historically and continues to do so today. As practice changes, more and more interest and reflection descends upon it.

Such considerations may include (but would by no means be limited to) issues around  practice as a form of research, professionalisation and specialisation, social and community architecture, the economies of architectural practice, scales of work in relation to scales of organisation, access to skills and knowledge, and the boundaries to instigating new methodologies.

Building Material 21 invites submissions that explore the range of architectural possibilities inherent within the word practice in Ireland and elsewhere. Submitted articles must not have been published, nor be under consideration for publication, either online or in print. Written submissions should be a maximum of 4000 words and should be analytical and critical rather than descriptive. While inviting submission of academic papers, it also seeks and encourages interesting essays that fall beyond the academic pale. Shorter articles are welcome, as are graphic works.

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Ardeth (Architectural Design Theory)

Call for Contributions

February 10 2017 - February 10 2017

Event web site

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In the last fifteen years we witnessed a new ethnographic wave of studies that focused on practising architecture (Jacobs and Merriman 2011). Inspired by pragmatism and Science and Technology Studies (STS), this body of research aimed at grasping the socio-material dimension of architectural practice (Callon 1996). They all relied on the assumption that architecture is collective but it is shared with a variety of non-humans. It is not a social construction, like Diana Cuff assumed, but rather a composition of many heterogeneous elements, an assemblage. These “new ethnographies” followed
the principles of no hierarchy, attention to the detail, symmetry: attention to what happens between humans and nonhumans; undivided attention to words and the gestural and non-verbal language. Paying specific attention to the texture of ordinary life of deisgners, they generated “thick descriptions” of the knowledge practices of different participants in design published as monographs of architectural practices (Houdart 2009, Loukisass 2012, Yaneva 2009). This recent trend could be also termed as “ethnographic turn in architecture” as it is the outcome of several related processes: the emergence of

a reflexivity trend among architectural professionals as a key epistemological feature of architectural studies, the growing realisation of architecture as a social practice and the social nature of outcomes of architectural production, the tendency to acknowledge the collective nature of design.

As a methodological innovation, the reintroduction of the ethnographic methods into architecture twenty years after the pioneering work of Dina Cuff does hold remarkable potential to investigate new questions. This new development can contribute to dislodge the certainty of traditional architectural knowledge, the belief placed in the absolute authority of the historical archives and its simplifications by its practitioners reducing, even naturalising architectural research to the production of critical discourse about practices, yet taking it far from the nitty-gritty realities of design making.

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Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns

Call for Contributions

Wellington, NZ

March 01 2017 - March 05 2017

Event web site

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Performing, Writing: A symposium in four turns  imagines how a text can be conceptualised, written, presented and figured with equal or more contingency and responsiveness to temporal and corporeal happenings, and vice versa. What creative, dialogic, autobiographical or alternative writing approaches might elicit a text that engages with the plurality of affects of an artwork?  How might a creative work be informed, inspired, directed, scripted or critiqued with the same respect for live-ness that unfolds spatially as it does textually? How might these parallel practices inhabit space symbiotically?  How might a new culture of criticality develop in between acts of “performing through”?

The symposium seeks to attract contributions from a wide range of creative practices such as architects, designers, performance artists, writers, musicians, dramaturges and dancers. It is structured as four turns playing out across several days of experiences, textures, flavours and modalities linking acts of performing with acts of writing.

A FULL SYMPOSIUM PROPOSAL should include:
A Cover Sheet (sent as a separate word document) listing your name(s), proposal title, affiliation(s), contact details.

A Proposal (sent as a separate word document no more than 2 A4 pages) that presents, describes, imagines and contextualises your contribution to the symposium. Images, drawings and links are encouraged. Avoid revealing your identity in this document. Identify which of the day provocations your proposal links to best and how. List any equipment required. Unlike most conferences and symposiums where presenters are allocated 20 minutes and the mode of delivery defaults to Powerpoint projections in a darkened room, this event challenges us to inhabit time, space and body with a broader spectrum of possibilities. For example, one could occupy 5 minutes of each day at the same time, prompt a participatory exercise, or incite an oration or inscription in relation to the local architecture. The symposium programme will be crafted to support the variety of proposal responses.

Submit proposals to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by end of day 1 July 2016 (NZ time).
Questions can be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
FAQ will be posted and updated on the website: http://www.performingwriting2017.com

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